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A Level Sporting Supplements

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Daniel Yates

on 20 January 2013

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Transcript of A Level Sporting Supplements

Sporting Supplements •Outline the range and function of sport supplements available to the performer to include: creatine, protein and herbal supplements, bicarbonate of soda and caffeine Learning Objective 6
Supplements Creatine Increased Muscular Strength
Increased Lean Muscle Mass Gains Side Effects Abdominal Cramps
Water Retention
Bloating
Diarrhoea
Weight Gain Protein Women 46g Men 56g In the main, assuming a well balanced diet, protein supplementation should not be necessary for any athlete. Their RDA of protein can be achieved through a regular diet. Herbal Remedies Gains (Questionable gains) Loss of Body Fat
Increase in Hormones
Increase in Muscle Mass
Enhance Energy
Improve Stamina Side Effects Not so much side effects as potential hazards. Athletes could take herbal remedies and then fail drug tests. A statement from the German National Paralympic Committee said Ahmet Coskun had tested positive for finasteride, a drug used to treat hair loss but which can also mask other banned substances, after a pre-competition urine test on Aug 23.

"I was thinking about my hair and had no idea that the drug contained a banned substance. I'm very upset. I never intended to do doping," Coskun said.

German chef de mission Karl Quade expressed regret at the news. "We take the issue of anti-doping very seriously. We've been carrying out an intensive anti-doping campaign for years in cooperation with NADA (the German anti-doping agency)," he said in a statement.

Coskun, 33, who played for Germany in three of their pool matches but not in Wednesday's 73-63 win over Iran, will return home soon, German paralympic chiefs said.

Coskun was the second athlete to have tested positive at the Games. Pakistani powerlifter Naveed Ahmed Butt, 37, tested positive for the steroid methandienone metabolites on Sept 4, two days before the opening ceremony. A statement from the German National Paralympic Committee said Ahmet Coskun had tested positive for finasteride, a drug used to treat hair loss but which can also mask other banned substances, after a pre-competition urine test on Aug 23.

"I was thinking about my hair and had no idea that the drug contained a banned substance. I'm very upset. I never intended to do doping," Coskun said.

German chef de mission Karl Quade expressed regret at the news. "We take the issue of anti-doping very seriously. We've been carrying out an intensive anti-doping campaign for years in cooperation with NADA (the German anti-doping agency)," he said in a statement.

Coskun, 33, who played for Germany in three of their pool matches but not in Wednesday's 73-63 win over Iran, will return home soon, German paralympic chiefs said.

Coskun was the second athlete to have tested positive at the Games. Pakistani powerlifter Naveed Ahmed Butt, 37, tested positive for the steroid methandienone metabolites on Sept 4, two days before the opening ceremony. Paralympic Example Bi-carbonate phosphate Gains Neutralise Lactic Acid
Consequently athletes can work at a higher intensity for longer. Side Effects Diarrhoea
Stomach Cramps
Nausea Scientists have proven what athletes have been claiming for years - that Granny's old cure-all, bicarbonate of soda, can enhance performance. 'Soda-doping', as it is known amongst professional sportsmen, can have a significant effect on endurance and speed.

Baking soda appears to work best to enhance speed. A study at Loughborough University found that of nine swimmers who took baking soda before an event, eight reduced their times, the Times reports. Jonathan Folland, who led the study, said: 'Essentially, sodium bicarbonate is an alkali substance that increases the pH of the blood. 'This seems to reduce and offset the acidity produced in the muscles during intense, anaerobic exercise that produces lactic acid most quickly, such as fast running or swimming.'

Sodium bicarbonate, as anyone whose taken it for indigestion knows, reduces acids - helping the body to deal with the acidic waste products produced during exercise, that tire us more quickly. But the substance isn't a miracle-worker - shaving seconds, not minutes, off performance time - so that only the most proficient athletes will notice a difference. The swimmers in the Loughborough study cut 1.5 seconds from their 200m time. Which is hardly significant for most of us who take a leisurely few laps up and down the pool.

A study at the American College of Sports Medicine found that runners could also improve performance with baking soda. But the substance - used before modern times as a household cleaning agent - can cause upset stomachs, and tastes foul. 'It is not dangerous, but it tastes appalling,' warns Dr Folland. He says that only those who are very serious about sport should try the white powder, which may cause diarrhoea.

The Times 2008 Research Caffeine Gains The status of caffeine has not changed from last year. Caffeine was removed from the Prohibited List in 2004. Its use in sport is not prohibited.

Many experts believe that caffeine is ubiquitous in beverages and food and that reducing the threshold might therefore create the risk of sanctioning athletes for social or diet consumption of caffeine. In addition, caffeine is metabolized at very different rates in individuals.

Caffeine is part of WADA's Monitoring Program. This program includes substances which are not prohibited in sport, but which WADA monitors in order to detect patterns of misuse in sport.

The 2010 and 2011 Monitoring Programs did not reveal global specific patterns of misuse of caffeine in sport, though a significant increase in consumption in the athletic population is observed
World Anti Doping Agency 2012 Reduces the body's perception of muscle fatigue.
Increases the ability of muscles to use food as a fuel Side Effects Dehydration
Sleep deprivation
Muscle
Abdominal cramping It is also worth noting that it was once a banned substance but was taken off the WADA banned substances list in 2004. Water - Electrolytes Water is another essential nutrient of an athlete’s diet.
Endurance performers especially should drink a lot more than the 2–3 litres suggested for the typical adult.
It is recommended that performers drink between 400–500ml 15 minutes before training or competition, whilst during exercise it is recommended that 150–200ml be taken on board every 15–20 minutes.
Fluid replacement should obviously continue during the recovery period.
The importance of H2O What are electrolytes? The dangers of dehydration Sodium, Potassium and chlorine form electrolytes which help to maintain the correct rate of exchange of nutrients and waste products into and out of the muscle cell. This ensures optimum performance during the activity and facilitates recovery.
Electrolytes are important because they are what your cells (especially nerve, heart, muscle) use to maintain voltages across their cell membranes and to carry electrical impulses (nerve impulses, muscle contractions) across themselves and to other cells.
Reduces the effectiveness of the nervous system and the circulatory system.
This causes the blood to effectively become ‘thicker’ which slows down the flow to the working muscles.
In attempt to compensate, the heart beats faster putting the body under greater stress.
The loss of electrolytes through sweating can cause fatigue and cramps so it is essential that performers remain hydrated. The effect on performance of the loss of electrolytes Can an athlete drink too much? Drinking too much water can lead to hyponatremia: a condition which causes the concentration of sodium in the blood to fall below normal levels. This condition essentially weakens the water-electrolyte balance, and can cause swelling of the brain leading to seizures and even death!!!! Now consider the following questions? How could an athletes activity influence the supplements they would take? How could an athletes diet influence the supplements they would take? How could an athletes schedule in relation to competition effect the supplements they would take? Learning Objective Recap Can you outline the range and function of sport supplements available to athletes?
Can you highlight the benefits of taking creatine, protein and herbal supplements, bicarbonate of soda and caffeine and their side effects?
Can you consider different athletes requirements and suggest which sports supplements could be appropriate for them taking into account factors such as their activity, training regime and diet?
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