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A Closer Look at Poetry

A detailed analysis of "Ozymandias" and "The Soldier"
by

Ayshia Coletrane

on 22 March 2013

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Transcript of A Closer Look at Poetry

A Closer Look at Poetry I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: `Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.
And on the pedestal these words appear --
"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.' Ozymandias The Solider Percy Bysshe Shelley Rupert Brooke By Ayshia Coletrane Percy Bysshe Shelley what's happening? what is the author saying? So we heard the poem but... A
N
D The speaker tells of a time he met a person from an "antique land," or an old country with rich history (Egypt).

The speaker recalls what this person said to him. The traveler described an ancient ruin he had seen with great detail: a shattered statue lies in the Egyptian desert; its legs are the only part of it that remain standing while the face of the statue is half buried in the sand. The face's mien is noted as stern and hard. The traveler also notes that whoever created the sculpture truly understood the person whom the sculpture was modeled after.

The pedestal on which the sculpture stood, states, "My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!" The inscription on the pedestal is basically the words of Ozymandias himself, telling passersby to acknowledge his glory which is made obvious through his magnificent kingdom and amazing achievements. However, the traveler says that as he looked around the statue, he saw absolutely nothing; he only saw miles and miles of a vast empty desert around the decayed statue. Ayshia's Happenin' History Lesson Ozymandias was another name for Ramesses II (1303-1213 BC), the greatest of Egypt's pharaohs. He fought the Hittites in the famous Battle of Kadesh, signed the first peace treaty, fathered more than 160 children, and was responsible for a massive building program. He was also most likely the pharaoh during Moses' time. He ruled for 67 years. 1
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8 Through his poem, Shelley uses strong diction, detailed imagery, and allusion to tell his readers that glory and power are fleeting and that every man will become a victim of death and destruction. wisely points out that nothing lasts forever. He also reveals the insignificance of man and the futility of his earthly achievements. In the poem, Ozymandias is portrayed as a successful, prideful, and majestic leader who was responsible for a number of accomplishments. Through the description of Ozymandias, it is not hard to imagine him in his time--a widely powerful and admired ruler living in all of his glory and luxury in a beautiful and vast Egyptian empire of the past. Nevertheless, the reader is quickly brought back to the reality of present time as the description of Ozymandias' broken sculpture in the middle of a barren desert is reintroduced.

In this poem, Shelley shows that no matter how great a man becomes in life--whether through his works, knowledge, money, possessions, or power--all of his greatness eventually comes to an end, and he, too, meets his end; every man dies, and when he does, his name and achievements die with him in time. Shelley makes this theme extremely clear in the end of his poem: as the traveler looked around Ozymandias' statue, he saw nothing, only hundreds of miles of sand and bareness. Thus, it is evident that Ozymandias, his name, and works all passed away and were forgotten. It is also only a matter of time until the remaining parts of his statue erode or are covered by sand. Apparently, all of the treasures that Ozymandias stored for himself on earth ultimately meant nothing. Paraphrase Identified Theme Diction Imagery Allusion Outstanding imagery is used in this poem. Throughout the poem, one is able to visually imagine the poem without problem. Shelley's use of imagery allows the reader to truly visualize the destruction of Ozymandias' statue and the bleakness of its surroundings. This quickly establishes the mood of the poem and aids the reader in receiving the writer's theme. I met a traveler from an antique land
Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed;
And on the pedestal these words appear:
“My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!”
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away. When analyzing the poem as a whole, Shelley's imagery seems bring death and decay into the picture--the decaying of the statue as well as the death/decay of Ozymandias' legacy and his body (maybe??). By making death and decay a major part of the piece, the concepts become important motifs to Shelley's theme. They carry the theme by putting it into a visual perspective; they depict what eventually becomes of every man and his accomplishments and possessions. Words A Picture is Worth It is pretty obvious that Shelley alludes to Ozymandias, or Pharaoh Ramessess II of Egypt. As stated earlier, Ramessess II is the most legendary, successful, and praised of Egypt's pharaohs. Shelley alludes to Ramessess to fully convey his theme. He shows that not even Ramessess' greateness and glory could make him immune to death, decay, and destruction. It was wise of Shelley to allude to Ramessess because it allows the reader to truly understand that riches, works, and power are fleeting and that no one is exempt from death. It also reveals that even though Ramessess ruler of one of the most powerful kingdoms during the time, could gain control over the hands of time. In "Ozymandias," Shelley uses a strong choice of words to describe the character of Ozymandias. Although the ruler is dead, the reader still captures a sense of life in the character through Shelley's great use of diction. The first description of Ozymandias is of his statue's face; it is said to have a "frown," "wrinkled lip," and "sneer of cold command." These three unfavorable descriptions of the sculpture's fallen face contain negative connotations; these words are associated with harshness, dissatisfaction, authoritativeness, and strictness. Following these details, the traveler claimed that the sculptor of the statue "well these passions read;" here, the traveler tells the speaker that these "passions" of the ruler were quite accurate and well depicted through the sculptor's work of art. These choice of words tell the reader that Ozymandias was a very commanding and austere ruler. One can also take the description farther and assume that he was so overbearing that he unfairly pushed others to meet his desires of perfection and dominance.
Ozymandias is further described through the pedestal's written description. In it, Ozymandias is described as "king of kings." The ruler then tells others to "Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!" Through this, Ozymandias is not only a harsh ruler, but also a prideful and boastful one. The phrase "king of kings" is often related to Jesus, however, this description is used to label Ozymandias instead. Yes, I know Jesus was not born at this time, however, Shelley's choice to incorporate this phrase into his poem about Ozymandias implies what Ozymandias thought of himself--he saw himself as the "king of kings," the all-powerful ruler of all. In addition, Ozymandias' command for everyone to observe his works, shows how arrogant he is. Ozymandias' arrogance is highlighted through his statement for all admire the work of his hands and "despair" at the thought of rising above his power.


All in all, Shelley uses negative diction to thoroughly describe the character of Ozymandias. Although the diction is negative, it shows what a powerful man Ozymandias was--he was one of authority, wealth, and great influence. This forwards the theme because it shows that great pride and great power comes before one's fall and even great men like Ozymandias meet the same outcome as any other man. The Power of 1000 Words It's All An Allusion Techniques Other techniques include: synecdoche eponym hyperbole metaphor If I should die, think only this of me:
That there's some corner of a foreign field
That is for ever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware,
Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam,
A body of England's, breathing English air,
Washed by the rivers, blest by suns of home.

And think, this heart, all evil shed away,
A pulse in the eternal mind, no less
Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given;
Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day;
And laughter, learnt of friends; and gentleness,
In hearts at peace, under an English heaven. Shelley's allusion also brings irony--though the writings on Ramessess' pedestal speak of his excellence and wonder, there is no evidence of either in site; only the shattered statue remains--which stands as evidence for quite the opposite. There is also a stark contrast here: Ramessess the Great, pharaoh of the beautiful and advanced Egyptian empire of the past vs. his broken statue, half-buried in the sand and alone in the desert in the present. Irony Structure and Syntax I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: `Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.
And on the pedestal these words appear --
"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.' This poem is an iambic pentameter sonnet. It is not like most sonnets which take on the Shakespearean, Spenserian, or Petrarchan styles. Instead, it takes on a mixture of these forms as well as makes claims some original aspects. It has an octave and sestet like the Petrarchan sonnet, however it has a rhyme scheme of ABABACDCEDEFEF (the rhyme scheme starts Shakespearean, but does not continue that way). The poem is full of "s" sounds/words. These sounds give the poem an easy flow. However, the writer stronger consonant sounds and alliteration to emphasize particular words in the poem. The word "nothing" is very important in this poem. It is quite interesting that Shelley would place this word immediately after Ozymandias' declaration of his greatness. This possibly implies that Ozymandias' success is empty and in vain. THE SOLDIER 1
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4 So we heard this poem but... what's happening? what is the author saying? A
N
D Rupert Brooke PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY
(1792-1822) RUPERT BROOKE
(1887-1915) Let's Meet the Authors OZYMANDIAS Paraphrase This poem was published in 1914, the first year of World War I. Thus, it is evident that the speaker of the poem is a soldier fighting in the war; it is also evident that he is fighting England. Ayshia's Happenin' History Lesson After the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria by a Serbian nationalist, tensions exploded between Austria-Hungary and Germany and Serbia, Russia, France, Great Britain, Italy, and Japan. Long story short, when you have an alliance with a country...their enemy is your enemy...so you're basically dragged into war with them. All of this ended in a deadly outcome of 9 million soldiers killed and more than 21 million wounded. The speaker begins the poem by telling the reader that even if he dies fighting in another country, the area where his body lays is "for ever England" because he is an English man. Because of this, the country's soil where his body rests will be "richer" and better because it contains an essence of England.

The speaker then talks of England, his home country. He states that England made him the person that he is; he is a true English man, one who was born in the country, raised by an English family, and grew up under England's sun, bathed in England's rivers, and breathed England's air. The speaker then explains that dying for his beloved country will make wash him pure. Because he has done the deed of fighting wholeheartedly and dying honorably for his great, beautiful country, the sins of his soul are washed away.

In the end, the solider says that dying for England brings a sense of pride, joy, and warmth to him. When he thinks of dying for England, he thinks of all of the wonderful memories that are linked to his country; he will gladly dwell in an English heaven because he knows that his heart will be at peace and his soul will be filled with happiness. Identified Theme Rupert Brooke, an English soldier during World War I, wrote "The Soldier" to express his great patriotism and undying love for his country; he clearly communicates this theme through the use of positive diction, alliteration, anaphora, appealing imagery, and personification in his poem.

Brooke also introduces the idea of redemption when one dies for his country in his poem. As the speaker of the poem states that his sins and evils are instantly cleansed when he dies for his country, he says that everything is made right through his death; he is redeemed through his death for his country. This idea can be considered a secondary theme in "The Solider"--dying for one's country is the greatest good that one can do. This theme can also be taken a bit farther by claiming that one does not need God's mercy or Jesus' death to redeem his soul from the chains sin and the depths of Hell--one could simply honorably and bravely die for his country, and God, pleased with the deed, welcome that person into heaven (or maybe that's a stretch???). Techniques The Power of Words Diction Structure and Syntax A Picture is Worth 1000 Words Imagery Coming to Life Personification Alliteration Although Brooke's poem is about war and death, he uses many positive words throughout his poem. He uses the words "rich" and "richer" when describing his dead body in a foreign country's soil. Brooke also uses "flower," "love," "blest," and "home" when remembering what his beloved country. In the second stanza where Brooke speaks of reintroduces the subject of dying for England, he uses the phrases and words, "evils shed away," "dreams happy as her day," "laughter, learnt of friends," "gentleness," "hearts at peace," and "English heaven" in the poem. The positivity in this poem is almost ironic since a great majority of people associate war and death with grief, pain, and hopelessness; however, Brooke uses these uplifting words to evoke a light and hopeful tone and mood; he is confirming that dying for his country brings him pure joy, peace, fulfillment, and positive thoughts. This diction successfully brings out the theme as it creates this light, hopeful mood and tone; it demonstrates the soldier's abounding love for his country and his great sense of patriotism, loyalty, and pride in his country. If I should die, think only this of me:
That there's some corner of a foreign field
That is for ever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware,
Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam,
A body of England's, breathing English air,
Washed by the rivers, blest by suns of home.

And think, this heart, all evil shed away,
A pulse in the eternal mind, no less
Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given;
Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day;
And laughter, learnt of friends; and gentleness,
In hearts at peace, under an English heaven. "The Soldier" is also a sonnet written in iambic pentameter. "The Soldier" is a mixture of two sonnet forms--the Petrarchan sonnet and the Shakespearean sonnet. The poem's octave has a rhyme scheme compatible to the Shakespearean sonnet, ABABCDCD; however, when the poem enters its sestet, it takes on a rhyme scheme of a Petrarchan sonnet, EFGEFG. A major aspect of the structure of "The Soldier" is Brooke's repeated use of commas and semicolons. Even though this does not seem to be a significant aspect of the poem, these commas and semicolons create many pauses when read aloud. Though Brooke's poem has a light, optimistic tone and mood and a great theme of patriotism and allegiance to one's country, it does not have a soft, easy flow. Instead, these punctuation marks make the poem come to abrupt pauses which cause the reader to dwell on the soldier's speech. They also add a dramatic effect to the poem. The speaker also repeats "England" several times within the poem. He does this to emphasize the significance of his country; thus, the repetition of England throughout the poem is anaphora. It was only necessary for the soldier to mention England once in his speech, however, he made sure to repeat it to highlight the importance of his country and its importance to him. Just like in most poems, alliteration is used to emphasize a particular point. There is a lot of alliteration used in this poem to underline many points. For example, the speaker repeats the "f" sound in the beginning of his poem to emphasize the fact that if is to die elsewhere, his death place will become like the land of England "for ever." He continues to emphasize this point when he repeats the "r" sound in "rich" and "richer." As the poem ends, the speaker uses the alliteration of the consonants "l," "s," and "d" to highlight the fact that dying for England brings him pride, satisfaction, and happiness--the speaker makes sure he gets that point clear across to the reader.

All of these uses of alliteration (and others) are included in the poem by Brooke to make sure that the reader fully sees the soldier's point--he loves his country, will do anything for it, and receives joy when he sacrifices his time, strength, and life for it. In the beginning of the poem, the speaker uses imagery to allow the reader to visualize his death. He does this not to bring attention to himself, but to draw attention to his beloved country, England. He tells the reader that wherever his body lies to rest, the soil instantly becomes a much "richer" soil. This image allows the reader to grasp the greatness of England's value to the soldier as well as its overall significance as a country.

The speaker also uses imagery to make the poem more personal and warm. First of all, the entire poem is about war and death, yet somehow the speaker manages to deliver a positive mood and tone. This is not only done through diction, but also through imagery. The soldier uses the image of "flowers," "breathing English air," "rivers," and "suns of home," to create positivity in the midst of a dark subject. In addition, when the soldier uses imagery in the poem, he is frequently speaking of his relationship with England--his upbringing in the English country--breathing the air, bathing in the rivers, and dwelling under the English sun. All of this makes the poem more personal and develops the relationship between the soldier and his country. If I should die, think only this of me:
That there's some corner of a foreign field
That is for ever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware,
Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam,
A body of England's, breathing English air,
Washed by the rivers, blest by suns of home.

And think, this heart, all evil shed away,
A pulse in the eternal mind, no less
Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given;
Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day;
And laughter, learnt of friends; and gentleness,
In hearts at peace, under an English heaven. There is a good amount of personification used in this poem. The speaker continuously states "her" throughout the poem, thus giving the land female characteristics. In the middle of the poem, the soldier says, "A dust England bore, shaped, made aware, gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam..." At this point in the poem, the speaker establishes a seemingly mother-son relationship between himself and his homeland. He describes how he has grown up in England, has been "shaped" her, and has become the man that he is today from the country's influence. This is comparable to a mother raising a child and shaping his thoughts and actions. He then notes that England gave him happiness through "her flowers" and "ways to roam," or her gorgeous landscape in which he could freely admire and explore. Personification is used in the end of the poem as the soldier recalls all of the pleasant aspects of his marvelous country and the unforgettable memories which he created in it; this is seen through the speaker's quotation, "...her sights and sounds; dreams as happy as her day..." If I should die, think only this of me:
That there's some corner of a foreign field
That is for ever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware,
Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam,
A body of England's, breathing English air,
Washed by the rivers, blest by suns of home.

And think, this heart, all evil shed away,
A pulse in the eternal mind, no less
Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given;
Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day;
And laughter, learnt of friends; and gentleness,
In hearts at peace, under an English heaven. Other techniques: synecdoche simile irony Hi, My Name Is: Percy Hello, My Name Is: Rupert Early Life and Education -born on August 3, 1887 to William Parker Brooke and Ruth Mary Brooke
-attended Rugby School, an esteemed school where his father was the housemaster
-received a scholarship to King's College at Cambridge University
-known for his intelligence, charm, creativity, great athletic ability, and ladies...his good looks! Many attribute his popularity to his attractive physical appearance (he associated with very elite groups/people like Winston Churchill)
-joined the Fabian Society while attending Cambridge; this was a society of English socialists who promoted democratic socialism; he later became the President of the Fabian Society at Cambridge University (HG Wells, Virginia Woolf also members)--became involved in politics as well
-published his first poems in 1909 and his first book, Poems, in 1911 Mid-Life and Career -helped with a series of poems titled Georgian poetry; belonged to the Georgian poets group...those who wrote in an anti-Victorian style with primary themes of friendship and love
-had relationship problems; fell in love with 3 women in 4 years--Noel Olivier (daughter of Jamaica's governor), Katherine Cox (Fabian Society member), and Catheleen Nesbitt (actress)..none of these relationships were successful
-suffered a mental breakdown in 1912 after the end of his 3rd relationship; left England for France and Germany for several months where he recuperated from this "nervous collapse"
-traveled to America and Canada and wrote articles for the Westminister Gazette
-traveled to the South Seas...wrote more poetry...in Tahiti, fell in love with a Tahitian woman named Taatamata
-returned to England as World War I broke out; enlisted in the Royal Naval Division in Oct. 1914
-experienced combat only once; during this time he wrote several poems that led to his rise in fame as a writer and his classification as a war poet Later Life and Death -As Brooke's ship sailed for the Darndanelles, he cought blood poising from a mosquito bite
-died April 23, 1915 on a hospital ship; he was buried in Skyros, an island on the Aegean Sea (only lived to be 28) Ayshia's Secret Facts -many say he was bisexual...after all, he attracted both sexes...what he did with them...not completely sure
-Brooke and his friends enjoyed odd pastimes like skinny-dipping. Virginia Woolf proudly admitted midnight dip in the pool with him
-His birthday is a day before Shelley's and four days before mine :) Early Life and Education -born August 4, 1792 to Elizabeth and Timothy Shelley; he was the eldest of five siblings
-attended Eton College and Oxford University
-wrote his first novel at Eton called Zastrozzi, a Gothic story in which he expressed his strong beliefs in atheism through the main character
-wrote a book with his sister called Original Poetry; by Victor and Cazire
-wrote pamphlets with his friend Thomoas Jefferson Hogg...in 1811, one pamphlet got him expelled from Oxford (had not attended the school for even a year)--"The Necessity of Atheism"
-Oxford offered to allow Shelley back into the school, however Shelley refused because it required him to disown the pamphlet and proclaim himself as a Christian; upon his refusal to do this, Shelley's relationship with his father was permanently torn Mid-Life and Career -at 19, he eloped to Scotland with Harriet Westbrook (16), a girl whom his father forbade him to see...his marriage with Harriet worsened Shelley and his father's relationship
-after marrying Harriet, he returned to England and dedicated 2 years to writing; through these two years, he wrote and published Queen Mab: A Philosophical Poem--the poem was inspired by his friendship with William Godwin, a socialist and atheist philosopher
-Shelley fell in love with Mary Godwin, William's daughter; he eloped with her to Switzerland
-with no support from their families, they moved back to England; there, Shelley spent a lot of time with Lord Byron--they even lived as neighbors
-Byron and Shelley spent hours sailing on Lake Geneva discussing ghosts and spirits; one night, Byron even proposed the idea of each person writing a ghost story--this led to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (Shelley wrote the introduction)
-in 1816, Shelley's Alastor (or The Spirit of Solitude) was published and in 1817, both of the Shelley's had their History of Six Week's Tour, a novel about their traveling
-wrote many more books including Laon and Cynthia (which ceased from being sold due to its atheistic and incestuous content) and Prometheus Unbound...he also wrote many political pamphlets open marriage Harriet committed suicide Later Life and Death -the couple moved to Italy
-Shelley focused on writing The Cenci, a tragedy play
-Shelley enjoyed sailing in his boat "Don Juan," however, it sank in a storm on July 8, 1822 while he was sailing; Shelley drowned and his body washed up on the shore
-his body was cremated on a beach in Italy (he lived to be 29) Ayshia's Secret Facts -Shelley and Harriet briefly had an open marriage when he let Thomas Jefferson Hogg, his friend live with them for awhile...this contributed to their broken marriage
-In 1816, Harriet drowned herself in a river
-Shelley claimed to have visions of meeting his Doppelgänger who he saw pointing to the Mediterranean Sea...shortly after reporting this, he drowned Ozymandias

The Soldier

Contrasted Compared vs. The poems are extremely different from each other--they pretty much differ in almost every aspect; however they mainly differ in: -Tone. In "Ozymandias," the speaker presents a negative tone throughout the poem. This tone is carried through the theme that nothing lasts forever; everything will die sometime. On the other hand, "The Soldier" has a positive overall tone, thus resulting in a positive theme of a soldier's undying love for his country.
-Involvement. The speaker of "Ozymandias" presents an essence of distance as he simply tells of an experience of a stranger he met. Unlike this, "The Soldier" contains personal involvement and great passion--the soldier is speaking of his own experience in a war and is very passionate about the subject.
-Setting. The poems take place worlds apart. "Ozymandias" reflects the setting of the arid, bare, and ancient Egyptian desert while "The Soldier" reflects the setting of England in the midst of a chaotic war. There weren't many similarities, but what I could find was a similarity in: -Structure. Both poems are sonnets which means they share an iambic pentameter form of 14 lines. They also both lack a definite sonnet form--they are both mixtures of sonnet forms.
-Literary devices. Both poems also use the same or similar literary devices to convey their themes. Both use alliteration of consonant letters to emphasize an important point in the poem and strong diction and imagery to allow the reader to visualize the piece and comprehend the mood and tone of the work. They also both use a sense of irony--in "Ozymandias" there is no glory to admire and "despair" in...only a barren desert, and in "The Soldier," it's ironic that the soldier receives death as a reward rather than something to be feared. Works Cited Ray, John. "Ramesses the Great." BBC News. BBC, 17 Feb. 2011. Web. 21 Mar. 2013. <http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/egyptians/ramesses_01.shtml>

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<http://www.therichest.org/most-expensive/the-top-10-most-expensive-wars/>

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"First World War Galleries." Home. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Mar. 2013. <http://www.awm.gov.au/visit/first-world-war-galleries/>

"Percy Bysshe Shelley." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 18 Mar. 2013. Web. 21 Mar. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percy_Bysshe_Shelley>

"Rupert Brooke." Rupert Brooke. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Mar. 2013. <http://www.english.emory.edu/LostPoets/Brooke.html>

"The Soldier By Rupert Brooke." YouTube. YouTube, 27 May 2011. Web. 21 Mar. 2013.

"Ozymandias." YouTube. YouTube, 25 Mar. 2009. Web. 21 Mar. 2013. and that was a very close look at poetry.
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