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Analyzing Effective Online Assessment

Analyzing Paloff & Pratt's effective assessment of online learners.
by

Armida Smith

on 24 December 2012

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Transcript of Analyzing Effective Online Assessment

Luz Armida Smith
ETL 684 Differentiated Online Instruction
and Assessment

Dr. Rothmund
December 8, 2012 Analyzing Effective Online Assessment Ask for and incorporate student input. Effective Online Assessment Design learner-centered assessments
that include self-reflection. Design and include grading rubrics for the assessment of contributions to the discussion as well as for assignments, projects, and collaboration itself. If rubrics are linked to course expectations and students are directed to use the rubric for self-assessment as well as assessment of their peers, they will end the course with a clear picture of their performance. Include collaborative assessments through public posting of papers, along with comments from student to student. By learning together in a learning community, students have the opportunity to: Encourage students to develop skills in providing feedback by providing guidelines to good feedback and by modeling what is expected. Use assessment techniques that fit the
context and align with learning objectives. Design learner-centered assessments that include self-reflection Design and include grading rubrics for the assessment of contributions to the discussion as well as for assignments, projects, and collaboration itself. Include collaborative assessments through public posting of papers, along with comments from student to student. Encourage students to develop skills in providing feedback by providing guidelines to good feedback and by modeling what is expected. Use assessment techniques that fit the context and align with learning objectives. Design assessments that are clear, easy to understand, and likely to work in the online environment. Ask for and incorporate student input. A well-designed online course should be learner focused and centered. This includes discussions, participation in collaborative activities, and self-reflection. Students should be asked to reflect on their participation in the activity and their contributions to the group. Rubistar http://rubistar.4teachers.org/ iRubric http://www.rcampus.com/indexrubric.cfm extend and deepen their learning experience test out new ideas by sharing them with a supportive group receive critical and constructive feedback The key to effective peer feedback is that it be constructive and encourage improvement. The instructor needs to act as a model of good feedback. The tone, frequency, and mode of delivery of feedback will be picked up by students and followed. A variety of assessment techniques should be employed to effectively assess student performance online. The grouping of assessment activities should be in alignment with: course objectives subject matter being studied the need to determine competency or skill acquisition The use of self-reflections, peer assessments, and rubrics align more closely with the objectives of an online course and will flow more easily into and with course content. Collaborative activity is best assessed by collaborative means. Design assessments that are clear, easy to understand, and likely to work in the online environment. Asking learners to become involved in the development of the assessment process, then, creates a cycle of learning that supports their growth as learners. Increases sense of community Promotes self-directed learning, self-efficacy, and discovery Increases problem-solving skills Introduces the element of choice in assessment Bibliography all images retrieved from google

Assessing the Online Learner (2009). resources and strategies for faculty/Rene M. Palloff and Keith Pratt. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass a Wiley Imprint.
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