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Poetry Analysis Project

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Crystal Schlueter

on 2 March 2013

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Transcript of Poetry Analysis Project

“Depth and breadth and height”- the profound love of the persona

“Sun and Candlelight”- day and night or good times and bad times in life

“Right”- free will and moral goals of the persona

“Praise” - materialistic life, superficial rewards

“ old griefs” - sorrow and pain in the past

“childhood's faith” - unqestioning faith

“Breath” - continuity of her love Analysis By Elizabeth Barrett Browning How do love thee? The Author Elizabeth Barrett Browning English poet
Born on the 6 March, 1806 in Durham
Was frail in her childhood and was diagnosed of a nervous disorder in 1826
By the age of twelve, she had written an epic consisting of four books of rhyming couplets.
In 1820, she published fifty copies of her first narrative poem “The Battle Marathon.”
In 1838, she published her first volume of mature poetry, "The Seraphim and Other Poems."
In 1846, she secretly married Robert Browning against her fathers wishes.
"Sonnets from the Portuguese," was dedicated to her husband, Robert Browning.
Died on the 29th June 1861 Analysis Word Choice, Word Order and Tone Poetic diction

The persona of the poem is the poet, Elizabeth Barrett-Browning

The rhetorical question, run-on lines and long vowel sounds bring out the intensity of the the poem

Romantic tone

Dramatic monologue Project POETRY ANALYSIS Imagery Sight Sun
Candlelight
Smiles
Tears Sound Praises
Breath Taste Tears Touch Count
Feel Movement by Paul Laurence Dunbar LONGING Reach
Smiles
Tears Paul Laurence Dunbar The Author Simile
Metaphor
Personification
Synecdoche
Paradox
Repetition Figures of Speech Symbols Symbol, Allegory
and Irony Sun and candlelight- day and night
Old griefs- pain and sorrow in the past
Saints- people who used to be close to the persona’s life
depth and breadth and height- infinite love Allegory Every human who is in love, who has been love or someone who believes in the infinite power and beauty of love. No irony Alliteration Sounds thee, the (Lines 1, 2, 5, 9, 12)
depth, breadth (line 2)
thee, they (Line 8)
soul, sight (Line 3)
love, level (Line 5)
quiet, candle-light (Line 6)
freely, strive, Right (Line 7)
purely, Praise (Line 8)
passion, put (Line 9)
my, my (Line 10)
love, love, lose (Line 11)
With, with (Line 12) Assonance How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace. (Lines 1-4)
Most quiet need, by sun and candlelight.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right; (Lines 6-7)
Smiles, tears, of all my life! -- and, if God choose, (Line 13) Euphony Rhyme Scheme How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. (a)
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height (b)
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight (b)
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace. (a)
I love thee to the level of every day's (a)
Most quiet need, by sun and candlelight. (b)
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right; (b)
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise. (a)
I love thee with a passion put to use (c)
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.(d)
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose (c)
With my lost saints, -- I love thee with the breath, (d)
Smiles, tears, of all my life! -- and, if God choose, (c)
I shall but love thee better after death.(d)
“sea”- a collection of memories.

“sweetest dreamings”-wishes and expectations of the persona

“dim and gray”- sorrow, pain, solitude, agony and loss.

“sea shore” -The bond between the persona’s emotions and the memories

“days of old” - previous memories

“chill baptismal spray” -a new beginning

“Ocean's moan!” -his sad memories that keep on troubling. Connotations Petrachan sonnet Poetic Form 14 lines
Octet - a naïve and fantasy-like love
Sestet- mature love
Has a rhyming scheme similar to the Petrachan model Lyric
The persona of the poem is yearning and longing for his love.

True and pure love lasts beyond the momentary and physical presense of those who are loved. Separation can cause mental, emotional and even physical pain. Middle diction

Persona of the poem could be Paul Laurence Dunbar or a person longing for love

We can observe that each stanza consists of one sentence, marked with a period at the end of the 4th line of each stanza.

This could indicate the movement of the waves which represents the flow of emotions.

Tone is romantic and also evokes desperation

Damatic monologue Word Choice, Word Oder and Tone Connotations Paul Laurence Dunbar was an African-American who was born on 27 June, 1872.
He was the son of two former slaves.
He studied in Dayton’s Central High School
After graduating from High School in 1891, racial discrimination forced Dunbar to work as an elevator operator in a hotel in Dayton.
In 1893 Dunbar published his first collection of poetry, Oak and Ivy.
Although he was criticized for his dialect poetry, many of his poems were written in Standard English.
In 1898, Dunbar married Alice Ruth Moore, but they seperated in 1902.
He died in Dayton on the 6th of February 1906. Theme
Religious faith Images Theme Sight Sound Smell Touch Movement Sea
Dim dark clouds
Sea shore
Chill baptismal spray waves rolling
wind blowing
whispers
"Ocean’s moan!” fresh salty air of the sea salinity of the water and the wind Taste soft sand
warm breath
cold waves Post-Colonial Perspective Paul Laurence Dunbar was the son of two former slaves.
He did not have any firsthand experience of slavery. He willingly listened to his mother’s stories about the South.
He was a victim of racial discrimination sit
whisper
waves rolling
laughter Onomatopoeia
Synecdoche
Metonymy
Personification
Repetition Figures of speech The repetition of the word "to-day" emphasizes the persona’s longing for his beloved and how much he wishes to be with her in the present. Repetition “not so loud the waves complaining at the shore”

“and I could give back laughter for the Ocean’s moan” Personification “baptismal spray” can be substituted for the new beginning the persona is longing for

“Nor find my hand and heart and all the world so cold,” the word “world” is used as a metonymy as it represents society

“laughter”can be a metonymy for his internal satisfaction and joy. Metonymy “Nor find my hand and heart and all the world so cold.” hand and heart represents the persona Synecdoche Compare/Contrast Theme : Love Fantasy
Poetic Diction
Romantic and religious tone
No irony
Symbols are used
Effective use of imagery
Figures of speech are used Symbols Reality
Middle Diction
Romantic and desperate tone
No irony
Symbols are used
Effective use of imagery
Figures of speech are used Critique Carries a deep meaning

Simple ideas expressed in profound ways

Both poems could be read and enjoyed by everyone Conclusion Conventionl
“sea” - memories

“Sea shore” -linking emotions and memories.

“Baptismal spray” - a new beginning. Two beautiful pieces of literature

True love is pure, unconditional and eternal. These two poems perfectly represent the essence of love. This poem represents people who long for love or a lost lover.

Reveals the emotions of a person in love, waiting for his lover to accept his love or return to him from a separation. ( Could be anything from a misunderstanding to death.) Contextual
“sweetest dreamings” - his happy moments with his lover

“Clouds so dim and gray”- rough and sad moments of his life Allegory Thank You NO IRONY Poetry Analysis SOUNDS References Alliteration and Consonance If you could sit with me beside the sea to-day, (Line 1)
If you could sit with me beside the sea to-day, (Line 1)
And whisper with me sweetest dreamings o'er and o’er ;( Line 2)
Nor find my hand and heart and all the world so cold. (Line 8) If you could sit with me beside the sea to-day, (Line 1)
And whisper with me sweetest dreamings o'er and o’er ;( Line 2)
I think I should not find the clouds so dim and gray, (Line 3)
If you could sit with me upon the shore to-day, (Line 5)
And hold my hand in yours as in the days of old, (Line 7)
Nor find my hand and heart and all the world so cold. (Line 8) Assonance If you could sit with me beside the sea to-day, a
And whisper with me sweetest dreamings o'er and o'er; b
I think I should not find the clouds so dim and gray, a
And not so loud the waves complaining at the shore. b

If you could sit with me upon the shore to-day, a
And hold my hand in yours as in the days of old, c
I think I should not mind the chill baptismal spray, a
Nor find my hand and heart and all the world so cold. c

If you could walk with me upon the strand to-day, a
And tell me that my longing love had won your own, d
I think all my sad thoughts would then be put away, a
And I could give back laughter for the Ocean's moan! d Rhyme and Rhyme Scheme EUPHONY The word “moan” resembles the sound of the slow waves of the ocean. Onomatopoeia “Longing” follows a fixed pattern.

The poem has three stanzas each carrying four lines(Quatrain).

We could categorize this poem as a lyrical as it is a short poem having song-like qualities. Poetic Form
In the first stanza, he askes his lover to come and sit with him beside the sea.
He says that if she comes he will be happy and all his sad thoughts will go away. Interpretation In the second stanza he again asks his lover to come and sit with him beside the sea shore and hold his hand. In the last stanza he asks his lover once more to come and walk with him beside the shore.

He wants her to tell him that he has won her love. The he will put all his sad away, and he will be happy. Braxton, J. (n.d.) Dunbar’s Life and Career. Modern American Poetry,
http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/dunbar/life.htm (2012, July 22)

Bremer A. (2011, March 8) ‘How Do I Love Thee?’ (Sonnet 43) by Elizabeth Barrett-Browning. English Language and Literature,
http://englishlanguageliterature.com/2011/02/17/how-do-i-love-thee-sonnet-43-by-elizabeth-barrett-browning/ (2012, July 25)

Brown, S. (1937) Sterling Brown on Dunbar. Negro Poetry and Drama,
http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/dunbar/brown.htm (2012, July 22)

Chong, C. (2011, March 8) ‘How Do I Love Thee?’ (Sonnet 43) by Elizabeth Barrett-Browning. English Language and Literature,
http://englishlanguageliterature.com/2011/02/17/how-do-i-love-thee-sonnet-43-by-elizabeth-barrett-browning/ (2012, July 25)

Cummings Editorial Team (n.d.) Sonnet 43. Cummings Study Guide,
http://cummingsstudyguides.net/Guides2/Sonnet43.html (2012, July 25)

Dream Dictionary (n.d.) Beaches. Dream Dictionary
http://www.unclesirbobby.org.uk/dreamdictionarybeach.php (2012, July 25)

Everett, G. (1993) The Life of Elizabeth Barrett Browning. The Victorian Web,
http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/ebb/ebbio.html

Ingebrigtsen,B. (2011, March 8) ‘How Do I Love Thee?’ (Sonnet 43) by Elizabeth Barrett-Browning. English Language and Literature,
http://englishlanguageliterature.com/2011/02/17/how-do-i-love-thee-sonnet-43-by-elizabeth-barrett-browning/ (2012, July 25)
Jester (n.d.) Poetic Devices in Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s “Sonnet 43, Universal Journal,
http://www.ayjw.org/articles.php?id=549401 (2012, July 25)
Merriman, C. (2006) Elizabeth Barrett Browning. The Literature Network,
http://www.online-literature.com/elizabeth-browning/ (2012, July 21)

Paul Laurence Dunbar (1897) Letter to Alice Nelson-Dunbar, Poets.org,
http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/21288 (2012, July 25)

Shmoop Editorial Team. (11 November 2008) Sonnet 43 Summary" Shmoop University, Inc,
http://www.shmoop.com/how-do-i-love-thee-sonnet-43/summary.html (2012, July 22)

Swanhorst ,J. (2010, January 7) How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count the Ways. Suite101,
http://suite101.com/article/how-do-i-love-thee-let-me-count-the-ways-a1 (2012, July 25)

University of Dayton (n.d.) The Life of Paul Laurence Dunbar. Paul Laurence Dunbar Website,
http://www.dunbarsite.org/biopld.asp (2012, July 22) The poem is about a person who is longing for his lover to return. He says that he will start everything fresh and new and not find everything so cold and emotionless if she returns. Love Love-
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