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Copy of Rules for Writing

Guidelines for formal vs. informal writing and other tips
by

Eric Schmidt

on 8 December 2014

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Transcript of Copy of Rules for Writing

Do Now: What different impressions do these pictures give you? List the differences
You should have noted a difference between formal and informal attire. The same goes for writing! Different types of writing are appropriate for different scenarios.
Formal vs. Informal Writing:
Tips and guidelines for writing
Formal Writing
Informal Writing
Personal Narratives
Notes/Letters
Movie/Book Reviews
Creative Writing
Journal Writing
Research Papers
Academic Essays
Persuasive
Expository
Job Cover Letters
Pros and Cons
Pros:
Personal tone
Stylistic
Capture personality
Uses casusal expression/grammar
Cons:
Unprofessional
More relaxed, but less convincing
Does not portray academic excellence
The FORMAL Formula:
How to write for academic excellence

1. MLA Formatting
1 inch margins
Last name with page #
Heading
Title (No Cover Page)
Double space the whole thing
2. Content and Organization
Introductions
General
Specific
Body Paragraphs
1 arguement/reason/focus per paragraph to support your thesis
Open each with topic sentence
Support
Statistics
facts
quotes
Clincher/Closing sentence
Use transitions between paragraphs
Using quotes in your writing
Use quotes to support/prove your own ideas
ALWAYS use the quote sandwich
introduce the quote
actual quote
explain quote
Use an in-text citation after your quote
introduce
use quote - include in-text citation
explain
Quote Sandwich
In- Text Citations
Same Sentence
page number
author
Conclusion
Conclusion should mirror your introduction
Specific --> general
3. Tips to Remember
Voice
- Stay in 3rd person. Do not use "I", "you", "me", "my", "our", etc.
Using 1st or 2nd person weakens your argument and confuses your reader
No contrations
Stay in present tense
Use specific language (avoid using things, stuff, a lot)
Avoid cliches, expressions, and figures of speech
Proofread
Works Cited
Used to credit your sources
Only sources your ACTUALLY cited should be in your works cited.
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