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7th Grade 5th Six Weeks - Timeless Tales

New approach - the entire 6 weeks can be found on this Prezi. Enduring Understanding: Myths, legends, and tales transce
by

Mark Schoenfeld

on 13 April 2012

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Transcript of 7th Grade 5th Six Weeks - Timeless Tales


1. What are some universal emotions that human beings share?

2. Why are stories about other places and times important to modern readers?

3. Why do humans tell stories?

4. Does literature reflect culture or shape it? Essential Questions: Tuesday, February 28, 2012 DO NOW 1. Pick up the paper at the door. Get your binder and take out your vocab chart and writer's notebook.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Fable chart.

3. Do Now - Writer's Notebook entry #2 - Make a list of bad decisions you have made and a lesson you have learned from each.
Ex: Decision - When I stole a piece of gum at the grocery store and got caught. Lesson - No matter how little the bad decision might be, someone will be watching. Take out a piece of paper and write the O. Henry heading on it. Do it right, or you will have to do it again!

Name
Subject - Period
Teacher's Name
Date

EX:
Justin Bieber
ELA - 1/2 period
Mr. Scho
2/28/12 Mr. Scho's
Desk Mr. Scho's
Desk 3rd period 5th period Angelina Lulu Caroline Sam Caitlyn Matthew Monroe Hank Jessica Thalia Hannah Tommy Shae Olivia Bobby Aidan Graham Liam Ezra Paul Brianna Maia Maddie Zeke Jamey Tiana Andrea Nora Mia Ashley Elena Demetria Salvador Chirae Rebecca Honus Paola Gabby Rey Mayely Emma Levi Grant Taylor Madeline Maria Collins Mia David Maricela Marcus Jalen Ronald Jackson Daisy Clay Charlie Samm Hoang Jake Wednesday, February 29, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and pick up the papers at the door.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Finish summaries and writer's notebook entry.

3. Leave your papers and binder at your seat, get out any books you need to return or read in the library, and line up at the windows outside the door. Students will be able to make inferences about the themes in various genres, and defend those inferences with text evidence. At the home of a rich family, a beggar arrives and asks for water. The lady of the house didn't help, but an ugly servant gives him a drink. As a thank you, the beggar gives the kind woman a handkerchief. The ugly servant washes her face with the handkerchief, and later realizes that she has become beautiful. The lady of the house learns about the magical handkerchief, and when it doesn't work for her, she summons all of the beggars in the town. The lady of the house feeds the beggars, but then demands their handkerchiefs in return. She takes one from the last beggar to leave. The lady of the house rubs her face, but it only gets darker and dirtier. At the home of a rich family, a beggar arrives looking for food and water. The lady of the house refuses to help, but an ugly servant gave him something to eat and drink. The beggar gives ugly servant his handkerchief U.S. washes her face with hanky, and she ends up beautiful Lady of the house finds out it was because of the hanky, and when it doesn't work for her, she invites all the town's beggars to the house. Lady of the house feeds the beggars, and as they're leaving demands their hankies. The lady of the house rubs the hanky on her face, but it only makes it darker and dirtier. Friday, March 2, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and a yellow Literature book.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Read and record in your reading log

3. Open your book to page 722 and begin reading "Waters of Gold". Monday, March 5, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and writer's notebook.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Complete/update entries from last week if grade below 80.

3. Take out your writer's notebook and complete entry #1 for the week. Title the entry "We Have a Problem" and prepare for the entry by brainstorming unexpected problems you have had in your life. 1) Divide…and conquer. First off, skim the text you are going to summarize and divide it into sections. Focus on any headings and subheadings. Also look at any bold-faced terms and make sure you understand them before you read. 2) Read. Now that you’ve prepared, go ahead and read the selection. Read straight through. At this point, you don’t need to stop to look up anything that gives you trouble—just get a feel for the author’s tone, style, and main idea. 3) Reread. Rereading should be active reading. Underline topic sentences and key facts. Label areas that you want to refer to as you write your summary. Also label areas that should be avoided because the details—though they may be interesting—are too specific. Identify areas that you do not understand and try to clarify those points. 4) One sentence at a time. You should now have a firm grasp on the text you will be summarizing. In steps 1–3, you divided the piece into sections and located the author’s main ideas and points. Now write down the main idea of each section in one well-developed sentence. Make sure that what you include in your sentences are key points, not minor details.
5) Write a thesis statement. This is the key to any well-written summary. Review the sentences you wrote in step 4. From them, you should be able to create a thesis statement that clearly communicates what the entire text was trying to achieve. If you find that you are not able to do this step, then you should go back and make sure your sentences actually addressed key points. main idea supporting details How to write a good summary Real-Life Uses of Summaries:
How was your day?
Book/Movie reviews
Facebook status
Lawyers
Newspaper reporters
Divide and Conquer 3 entries from last week:
Monday (HW) - Write about a childhood story/fable you remember - describe the story and say what lesson it teaches. If you need to make this one up you can do any entry.
Tuesday - In class entry - Describe a mistake you have made and the lesson you learned from it.
Wednesday (HW) - your choice - try one of the "Calling Up the Muse" prompts. Skim the passage, paying attention to text features and unknown terms. Read Read straight through without
stopping. Get feel for author's tone,
style, voice.` Tuesday, March 6, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and writer's notebook.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Finish personal narrative and reading log entry.

3. Look at the personal narrative planning sheet your picked up on your way into class. See if you can label the following parts: Lead, Reflection, Snapshot, Focus, Prompt, Support, Sensory Language, Thought Shot. We will go over these in about 3 minutes. Sometimes it’s hard to make a decision because there are so many choices.

Write a personal narrative about a time when you had to make a decision. Be sure to write about the choice you made and describe what happened as a result of your decision.
Decisions Decisions:
Tresspassing while camping
Going to a neighborhood party on school night
Staying at Barton Hills for 6th grade Wednesday, March 7, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and your interactive reader off the shelf.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Finish IR work and writer's notebook entry.
Turn in your memoir/web into the inbox if you haven't already.

3. Take out your book and reading log and enjoy SSR for the first 15 minutes of class. Choose excerpts of text and explain how those excerpts support the development of the theme of the legend. What personal traits were valued by the culture that created this legend? Theme = topic + lesson about topic Level 1 voice - barely above a whisper!

Read your personal narrative to a partner.
Next, your partner will say what the decision was and the effect it had on you.
Finally, say one thing that worked well in the PN and one thing that could be improved.

Then switch! Theme Title Plot Characters Setting what does the title refer to?
What ideas does the title emphasize? What do the main characters do and say?
How do the characters deal with conflict?
What lessons do the characters learn? What aspect of setting does the author emphasize?
What images stand out as memorable?
What conflicts does the setting create? What conflicts do the characters face?
How are the conflicts resolved? FRIDAY! March 9, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and your interactive reader off the shelf.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Read over SPRING BREAK!

3. Open up to page 287 in your IR and complete the 4 questions in the Texas Assessment Practice. Young Arthur The Sword in the Stone Expectations:
One Venn diagram per table will be turned in with ALL of your group's TAPs.
You must have at least 2 observations in each section (6 total).
Observations should be about the story elements, not the format in which it's told. Archimedes the talking owl. Monday, March 19, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get the papers at the door and your binder off the shelf.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Writer's notebook entry # 1 for the week.

3. Read the first passage in the packet you picked up and answer questions 1 and 2. after
although
as
because
before
even if
even though
if
in order
that

until
when
whenever
where
whereas
wherever
whether
while
why once
provided that
rather than
since
so that
than
that
though
unless Dependent Conjunctions Once when I tasted play-doh, it was salty.

In order to eat a cookie, you must have a cookie.

After I ate four cookies, my stomach hurt.

My stomach hurt after I ate four cookies.

Until the road is fixed, not cars can drive on it.

While she was listening to music, she was baking cookies. Tuesday, March 20, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and writer's notebook. Pick up both papers at the door.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Finish STAAR Writing Prep packet.

3. Answer the 2 questions on the half sheet of paper that your picked up. This is a TIMED DO NOW - you have 3 minutes to complete it after the bell. With your table group, reread "Volcanoes" on page 2 of your writing benchmark and review the 6 questions that follow. If anyone in your group has different answers, discuss as a table to decide which answer is correct. Take out your writer's notebook. At your table, take turns reading your sentence that includes a dependent clause. Although it was Nora's first time having a zebra cake, she enjoyed it.
-->Nora enjoyed the zebra cake even though it was her first time having one.

Rather than going to the mall, we decided to go swimming.

Although she died thinking I was a girl, I know my grandmother really loved me. After this morning, I was so tired.
I was so tired after this morning.

When I got my phone taken away, I was mad.
I was mad when I got my phone taken away.

When I found the two-headed turtle, I realized that the creek might not be safe to swim in.
-->I realized the creek might not be safe to swin in when I found the two-headed turtle. Wednesday, March 21, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and pick up the papers at the door.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Finish pre-writing for expository essay
Have last night's homework out at your seat for me to check.

3. Take out your book and reading log and enjoy SSR for the first part of class. If you need to go to the library, have your agenda out at your seat. Middle School Elementary School Main ideas The school day shorter, one or two
teachers, don't switch
between subjects,
recess, starts earlier Food Work load less homework
less strenuous
choice between classes, school is
an hour longer. Food the same Get to sit where you want
->helps socialization more homework, stress, tests, studying socialization stuck in one class
more free-time to
spend with friends more gossip
more socializing in classes
choose classes
meet people from different schools
no recess While the work load in elementary
is lighter and simpler, middle school
assignments are more strenuous and
complex.
less free time to finish projects/work
teacher schedules out every second of the class period
learning more in middle school because you're more capable of learning
subjects are more demanding in mid school, but more rewarding when accomplished Monday, March 26, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and take out your writer's notebook.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Get a good night's sleep and eat a healthy breakfast tomorrow!

3. Take out your writer's notebook and turn to your expository essay planning. Read your topic sentences and focus statement out loud to a partner. Your partner should tell you if your TS's and FS are clear and easy to understand. Take down the following notes in your writer's notebook:

Keys to Effective Drafting:
1. Use your pre-writing as a writing guide.
2. Write with your purpose, form, and audience in mind. Ask yourself the following questions:
Does my draft inlcude a clear focus statement that expresses my controlling idea?
Have I clearly described both things I'm comparing?
Have I written in a style appropriate to my audience?
3. Begin each middle paragraph with a clear topic sentence.
4. Summarize your ideas in the final paragraph. Opening Paragraph (aka "The Hook) Share an experience Give interesting information Create a dramatic scene Ask an intriguing question Choose one of the above hook strategies and write an opening paragraph for your expository essay. Comparison Contrast like
as
alike some
identical
similar also
both
each while
although
whereas still
yet
but different
however
even though You have 4 minutes to write at least two sentences using at least three comparison and contrast words. You must use at least one of each! 1. waking up on the day we're going to climb a mountain
2. having breakfast
3. driving up the mountain
4. climbing up it
5. reaching the top
6. climbing down
7. getting home where would you begin the story? At your table, brainstorm a list of stories that DO NOT begin at the beginning. Wednesday, March 28, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and take out your writer's notebook.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Bring your field trip money/forms!
Also, no tutoring after school today.

3. Turn to a neighbor and give at least 2 reasons why you're glad the writing STAAR is over. Finally, what is one thing you wish you had done differently in preparation for the test? Voices should be level ONE (quiet). Thursday, March 29, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and your interactive reader.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Finish reading Orpheus and Eurydice, answering Myth questions. Also, bring your field trip permission slip and money!

3. Turn to page 258 in your interactive reader, complete the quickwrite and read the Characteristics of Myths section. Ready, Set, GO! FRIDAY!!!!!! March 30, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and take out your interactive reader.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Reading Logs due on THURSDAY, and bring field trip money/permission slip.

3. Turn to page 271 in your interactive reader and complete the Texas Assessment Practice on your own. Monday, April 2, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and a yellow Literature book.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Writer's Notebook entry #1

3. Open up your Lit. book to page 662 and begin reading Icaraus and Daedalus. Book Video D&I trapped in tower D&I trapped in labrynth Talos, D's nephew, accidentally killed Icarus dies when he flies too close to the sun D finds I's body I drowns and is never seen D&I are trapped by Minos Use wings to escape feathers came from vulture feathers came from seagulls D never flies again Icarus is a clumsy little boy Tuesday, April 3, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and pick up the papers at the door.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Finish Pandora's Box plot diagram / summary.

3. Take out your writer's notebook and complete entry #2 for the week - your choice. Long ago, before hate or pain, Epimetheus and Pandora are children who play all day Pandora becomes obsessed with a mysterious box, and constantly annoys Epimetheus with questions about its contents. She weighs whether or not to open the box, but an intricate knot shutting the box gives her pause. Wednesday, April 4, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and pick up the papers at the door.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Reading Logs due TUESDAY!

3. Take out any books that need to be returned and your reading log. scho Tuesday, April 10, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and pick up the papers at the door.
TURN IN YOUR READING LOG.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Writer's Notebook Entry. Prometheus / Pandora Venn Diagram

3. Read "Demeter and Persephone" and answer the questions on the back side, including the SUPPORTING DETAILS. Wednesday, April 11, 2012 DO NOW 1. Get your binder and pick up the papers at the door.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Finish Guided Practice Handout

3. Take out your new reading log and book and enjoy SSR for the first part of class. Theme is the central message of a literary work. It is not the same as a subject, which can be expressed in
a word or two: courage, survival, war, pride, etc. The theme is the idea the author wishes to convey about
that subject. It is expressed as a sentence or general statement about life or human nature. A literary work
can have more than one theme, and most themes are not directly stated but are implied. The reader must
think about all the elements of the work and use them to make inferences, or reasonable guesses, as to which themes seem to be implied. Theme For example, if love is a topic/subject of two novels, a major theme in one of the novels could be “Love, if
taken to extremes, can be negative rather than positive,” while in the other novel, the theme might be “Love can conquer even the greatest evil.” Notice that the topic/subject is the same, but the messages about that topic/subject are different in different works. Begin by using several abstract words to state the principal ideas of the work (topics that the piece is
really about). Abstract words describe concepts or ideas that exist only in our minds like alienation,
prejudice, ambition, freedom, love, loyalty, passion, etc. Combine those abstract ideas with comments that reflect the author’s observations about human nature, the human condition, or human motivation. In other words, what is the author saying about the abstract idea? Is he/she, for example, saying something about the qualities of people and/or commenting on society? A theme is NOT a moral, a directive, or an order. Themes are NOT trite sayings. Themes do NOT refer to the specific names or events of a particular literary piece. Themes avoid absolute terms such as “all,” “none,” “everything,” or “always” because they indicate
sloppy thinking. Avoiding the common mistakes in writing a thematic statement: Theme Start with Topic Cultural Values Theme = topic (abstract) + observations (CVs) Harry Potter - pain
The Giver - Perfection
7th Grade - Honesty
Prometheus - Obedience
Pandora's Box - Curiosity
Hunger Games - Survival takes more work than most people are used to.
Harry Potter- Love can conquer anything.
The Giver - A perfect world is impossible to create.
Rikki-Tikki-Tavi - Show loyalty to the ones you love. Rikki-Tikki-Tavi - Fear, loyalty, bravery - "Loyalty sometimes demands the ultimate sacrifice."
Hunger Games - War, Faith, fear, Absolute Power - "Fear can keep people in the dark." "Hope and faith can defeat evil."
Pandora's Box - hope, temptation, obedience, curiosity - "Hope can overcome pain." "Unchecked curiosity can lead to disastrous circumstances.
Orpheus and Eurydice - love, loyalty, music "Music can have the power to change people's lives."

1. Get your binder and pick up the paper and folder at the door.

2. Write your homework in your agenda.
--> Read over the weekend.

3. Take out any materials you have for you fractured fairy tale (planning sheets, timeline, rough draft) and put them in the folder you picked up on your way into class. Put your name and story title on the front of the folder - make it EASY to read! FRIDAY! April 13, 2012 DO NOW No Reading Log? Ruh-Roh.

Here's what you can do to get a maximum grade of a 50:

Write a one-page, single-spaced summary of a book you read THIS six-weeks. The summary should include all of the important parts of the plot (exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution), discuss the characters, setting, and conflict, and include whether you would recommend the book to a peer and why.

Book reviews are due no later than 9 AM on Monday, April 16.
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