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LI 150: Introduction to Literature

Lesson plan slides for LI 150, "Introduction to Literature", Summer 2012 at Northern Marianas College
by

Galvin Deleon Guerrero

on 26 July 2013

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Transcript of LI 150: Introduction to Literature

Prosecution
Defense
Jury
LI 150:
Introduction to Literature
Summer 2013
Galvin Deleon Guerrero
Journal Entry #21 (July 26):
What 3 things did you learn from Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird"?
What 2 questions do you still have about the novel?
What 1 thing will you do with that you have learned from novel?
Opening Assignment
Energizer
3:00
What is your favorite movie?
6:00
Why are you taking this class?
9:00
Why do you read?
12:00:
Who is your favorite singer/band?
Getting to know you...
Course
Syllabus
Analysis:
Pixar's "One Man Band"
Analysis:
Ernest Hemingway's
"Cat in the Rain"
Text
Subtext
Context
Read Ernest Hemingay's "The Old Man and the Sea" and study Engrade lesson.
Prepare for 10,000 Pyramid game on Friday, July 27
Prepare for "Card"session on Friday, July 27.
Homework
Sorting Ceremony
Analysis
Text: What is the main conflict in the story?
Subtext: What might be the hidden meaning or message of the story?
Context: How might the story be relevant for you?
Meet in your houses and select a:
Discussion facilitator/moderator
Note-taker
Spokesperson
Review
Plot
protagonist + antagonist = conflict
a main character
wants or needs something
someone else, something else,
or something about the protagonist
prevents the protagonist from
getting what he wants or needs
Does the protagonist
get what s/he wants or needs?
Does s/he change for the better?
resolution
Chocolate
Did you enjoy the chocolate?
How did the chocolate taste?
Was it bitter? Sweet? Both?
Was the chocolate good?
Was it better or worse than other chocolates you've had?
Experience
Interpretation/Analysis
Evaluation/Critique
Understanding
Poetry
Group Work
Slytherin: William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily"
Gryffindor: Eudora Welty's "A Worn Path" (pp. 91-97)
Ravenclaw: Kay Boyle's "Astronomer's Wife" (pp. 62-65)
CAUTION:
Do
NOT
"murder to dissect" (William Wordsworth)
Quiz
Poetry
Lyric
Poetry=
Snapshot
of Emotions
vs. Stories?
Voice
Who is the saying the poem? (Speaker)
What does s/he sound like? (Diction)
What emotions can you hear in his/her voice? (Tone)
Imagery
What do you see?
What do you hear?
What do you feel?
What do you smell?
What do you taste?
Subtext
Simile vs. Metaphor
Symbolism
Allegory
Rhythm
and Rhyme

Rhyme
Alliteration
Assonance
Feet
Meter
Gryffindor:
Robert Frost
Group Presentation
Ravenclaw:
Langston Hughes
Group Presentation
Slytherin:
Emily Dickinson
Group Presentation
What happens to a dream deferred?

Does it dry up
like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore—
And then run?
Does it stink like rotten meat?
Or crust and sugar over—
like a syrupy sweet?

Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.

Or does it explode?
Harlem
Experience
Analysis
Evaluation
Voice
Imagery
Rhythm/Rhyme
Subtext
Course Slides
Available at www.prezi.com
Search for "LI 150"
Or email me.
Short Story:
The Prodigal Son
pp. 27-28
Evaluation
Interpretation
Experience
What does the text mean to me or others?
We evaluate the literary quality of the text AND the values underlying the text.
What does the text mean on its own, independent of what it means to me or others?
Setting
Point of View
Exposition
Conflict
Climax
Falling Action
Resolution
Short Fiction
Character
Aristotle's
Theory of
Catharsis
How does the narrator think or feel about the characters?
Is the narrator objective or subjective?
How do we, the readers, feel about the characters?
Do we relate to the characters?
Do we like the characters?
Do we care for the characters?
Characterization
Background information
What the characters look like
What the characters do
What the characters say
What the characters think or feel
A character's role in the story
Time and Place
How does the setting
affect
the plot and the characters?
How does the setting
reflect
the plot and characters?
First-person vs. Third-person perspective
Objective vs. Subjective
Omniscient vs. Limited Omniscience
How does the point of view affect our reading of the story?
Why does the writer use that literary device?
What is s/he trying to achieve with that literary device?
Studying Literary Devices
Plot Structure
imagery in setting
Subtext
Irony
Verbal Irony
Situational Irony
Dramatic Irony
Symbolism
Allegory
Why use irony?
Charades
Mock Trial of Hamlet
Essays
FOLLOW FORMATTING GUIDELINES PRECISELY.
Support your arguments with textual or contextual evidence.Don’t overstate your argument.
Do not announce what you will write about.
Write less passive and more active sentences.
Refer to the “speaker” not the poet
No contractions
CLARITY
KEEP

IT SHORT AND SIMPLE (KISS)
You are welcome to submit a re-write. (Due Monday, June 17, 4:00 pm)
Analysis:
Pixar's "For the Birds"
Analysis:
The Lost Thing
Analysis:
Gabriel Garcia Marquez's
"A Very Old Man with
Enormous Wings" (pp. 399-403)
Analysis:
Sandra Cisneros's
"There Was a Man,
There Was a Woman." (p. 245)
Analysis:
Short Film
"Denial"
Al Pacino's
"Looking for Richard"
Hamlet
"Who there?"
(I.i, 1-4, pp. 1545-1546)
Claudius's
Campaign
Speech
(I.ii, 1-39, pp. 1550-1551)
"'tis unmanly grief."
(I.ii, 87-117, p. 1553)
"Seems?"
(I.ii, 76-86, pp. 1552-1553)
Laertes lectures Ophelia
(I.iii, 1-51, pp. 1558-1559)
Polonius lectures Laertes
(I.iii, 52-87, pp. 1559-1560)
Polonius lectures Ophelia
(I.iii, 88-136, pp. 1560-1561)
Drama is meant to be performed.
Performances reflect decisions made by dramatists.
More than one interpretation is possible.
Wednesday, July 18
"antic disposition"
(I.v, 164-181, p. 1569)
Crazy? Crazy in Love?
(II.1, 72-104, pp. 1572-1573)
"You are a fishmonger"
(II.ii, 170-208, pp. 1578-1579)
"What a piece of work is a man!"
(II.ii, 274-285, p. 1580)
"To be or not to be..."
(III.i, 56-90, pp. 1589-1590)
"Get thee to a nunnery!"
(III.i, 90-152, pp. 1590-1592)
"What should a man do but be merry?"
(III.ii, 78-130, pp. 1595-1597)
"The lady doth protest too much."
(III.ii, 206, p. 1598)
"You cannot play upon me."
(III.ii, 305-325, pp. 1601-1602)
Don't kill Claudius.
Kill Polonius.
Lecture mom.
Run around the castle.
Sent to England to die.
"O, from this time forth,
My thoughts be bloody, or be nothing worth!"
(IV.iv, 10-66, pp. 1616-1618)
Laertes returns from France with a mob go avenge his father's death.
Ophelia goes crazy.
Ophelia drowns herself.
Hamlet sends Rosencrantz and Guildenstern to England to die in his place.
Claudius turns Laertes's anger against Hamlet.
"I'll have grounds
More relative than this: the play's the thing
Wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king."
(II.ii, 542-544, p. 1588)
"Stopping a bunghole?"
(V.i, 150-175, pp. 1634-1635)
"Let be."
(V,ii, 188-191, p. 1642)
"Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead."
(V.ii, 328-370, pp. 1646-1648)
Ernest Hemingway's
"The Old Man and the Sea"
Looking Ahead
Last chance to turn in missing work or extra credit: Monday, July 29, at 4:00 pm
Exam on Monday, July 29, 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm.
Exam: 13 Short Answer, 20 Hamlet, 20 Mockingbird, 1 Essay
Harper Lee's
"To Kill a Mockingbird"
Why read?
Analysis:
Paperman
Analysis: Curfew
3:00
What did you think about the short film?
6:00
What was the text, subtext, and context of the short film?
9:00
What did you think about the short film?
12:00:
What was the text, subtext, and context of the short film?
Analysis
Group Presentations
Ravenclaw: Flannery O’Connor
Slytherin: Edgar Allen Poe
Gryffindor: Sandra Cisneros
Poetry Analysis
"My Papa's Waltz"
by Theodore Roethke
Progress Reports
Poetry Alive
Shane Koyczan
"To this day..."
Poetry Alive
Lord Alfred Tennyson
"Ulysses"
(pp. 1196-1198)
"Toyland"
Analysis
Analysis
Kate Chopin's
"Story of an Hour"
(pp. 38-41)
Experience • Interpretation • Evaluation
Extra Credit
Short Story Discussions
Saturday, July 20, 10:00 am-11:30 am: Stephanie Vaughn's "Dog Heaven"
Full transcript