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Cooperative Learning Presentation: Techniques

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Elvira Landa

on 5 October 2014

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Transcript of Cooperative Learning Presentation: Techniques

Cooperative Learning Presentation: Techniques

Think-Pair-Share is a method that allows students to engage in individual and small-group thinking before they are asked to answer questions in front of the whole class.
This method can be very useful and works when teachers require students to formulate hypotheses about the outcome of an experiment before it is done.
Differentiated Instruction:
The teacher creates groups of diverse ability levels and backgrounds

What is Cooperative Learning?

The students in each team are responsible not only for learning the material being taught, but also for helping their teammates learn
Three Pilot Techniques
1- Think-pair-share
2- Send a Problem
3- Jigsaw
Differentiated instruction within cooperative groups.
Ways to govern groups

Challenges:
1-Some students will take over, not letting other students talk or share ideas.
2-Some students may require more "think" time than others
3- Maintaining focus on the issue at hand in all these small groupings

Cooperative learning is where teams of students with various abilities and skills work together on different activities to learn about a subject.
How students benefit from working in Cooperative Learning?
Students that are involved in cooperative learning achieve many social and academic benefits.
Cooperative classrooms are classes where students group together to accomplish significant cooperative tasks.

Why use Cooperative Learning?

Teachers who use cooperative learning methods promote learning because these collaborative experiences engage students in an interactive approach to processing information, resulting in greater retention of subject matter, improved attitudes toward learning, and enhanced interpersonal relations among group members

Cooperative Learning presentation:Techniques
1. With students seated in teams of 4, and number them from 1 to 4

2. Announce a discussion topic or problem to solve.

3. Give students at least 10 seconds of think time to THINK of their own answer.

4. Using student numbers, announce discussion partners.
(Example: For this discussion, Student #1 and #2 will be partners. At the same time, Student #3 and #4 will talk over their ideas.)

5. Ask students to PAIR with their partner to discuss the topic or solution.

6. Finally, randomly call on a few students to SHARE their ideas with the class.


Benefits:


1- improving students' reading comprehension

2-enhances students' oral communication
skills

3-Students have the opportunity to learn
higher-level thinking
Group Governing: the teacher should always monitor group activity to ensure that students are not veering too far off task.
The teacher should also be available to answer student questions and guide discussion if necessary

Problem solving: developing strategies and analysis
Send-a-problem: Students participate in a series of problem solving rounds, contributing their independently generated solution to those that have been developed by other groups.
After a number of rounds, students are asked to review the solutions developed by their peers, evaluate the answers


Benefits

1-Students are able to improve decision-making skills
2-Students use communication skills to have the right solution
3-students will ta


1-Personality conflicts—lack of appreciation of different approaches to problem-solving

2-Inability to meet due to time constraints

3-Lack of understanding of the goals of the assignment

Challenges
Governing Groups:
Teachers should set a deadline for the assignment
Teacher should assist students who need help

Differentiated Instruction:
Teacher must provide feedback to groups and individual students

1. The class should be divided into groups of four or five. (Home groups)



2. Students move from their home group to a specialized group to become an “expert”.



3. Each expert is given an assignment. The group must read and take notes to become experts.



4. Experts return to their home groups to teach their part of the assignment.

Benefits
1-By giving students both responsibility to teach and learn you are giving them opportunity to develop both research and teaching skills.

2- It help students build comprehension

3-It helps improve listening, communication, and problem-solving skills.



1-Some students feel time constraints in this task and appear unable to teach the expert group after research time is up. In these cases, students need additional time to research and discuss the issues.


2-When students do not understand the process


3-A slow student can cause problems by keeping the group back, and not be able to finish the assignment

Challenges
Differentiated Instruction:
This can be done by giving students, or groups of students, different materials to match their levels of readiness and/or differentiating each group’s products/projects based on interests, preferences, or multiple intelligences.

References
Burden, P. R., & Byrd. D. M. (2010). Methods for effective teaching: Meeting the needs of all

students (5th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon

Jacobsen. D. A., Eggen, P., & Kauchak, D. (2009). Methods for teaching: Promoting student

learning in K-12 classrooms (8th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.
Jigsaw
This cooperative learning strategy is an efficient way to learn material.
Through collaborative interaction with peers, group members must first complete a portion of the task and then work collectively with a team to complete a common goal. In addition, this strategy encourages listening, and engagement.

Jigsaw takes careful monitoring. Instructors and Teaching Assistants, if involved, will be moving among the various expert teams, monitoring their progress and checking to see that all students are involved
Governing groups:

Benefits:
1-Students are able to improve decision-making skills
2-Students use communication skills to have the right solution
3-students will take on a leadership role
Challenges:
1Personality conflicts—lack of appreciation of different approaches to problem-solving

2-Inability to meet due to time constraints

3-Lack of understanding of the goals of the assignment

Differentiated Instruction: Teacher must provide feedback to groups and individual students

Governing Groups:
Teachers should set a deadline for the assignment
Teacher should assist students who need help

Send-a-problem: Students participate in a series of problem solving rounds,
contributing their independently generated solution to those that have been developed by other groups. After a number of rounds, students are asked to review the solutions developed by their peers, evaluate the answers
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