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The Bill of Rights

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Brielle Caban

on 20 October 2014

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Transcript of The Bill of Rights

The Bill of Rights
Brielle Caban
Amendment #1 Religious and Political Freedom
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.
The first amendment states that their citizens have freedom of speech and religion. They have the right to establish a religion and have the right to worship a god, more than one or none. Though, the religion cannot interfere with the natural human rights of the citizen. For example, human sacrifice. The people are free to express their opinions politically, and are allowed to protest non-violently.
How does it protect individual rights?
The first amendment protects each citizen from the government's control.
This amendment was included because it is one of the most important amendments, it protects the basic rights of humans and from government interference.
Why was it included
?
How was it relevant in US history?
Example:
Amendment #2
Right to Keep and Bare Arms
A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.
Amendment Description
How does it Protect individual rights?
Why was it included?
How was it relevant in US history?
Example:
Amendment #3 Quartering of Troops
No soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be persecuted by law.
Amendment Description
The government can't make a citizen house a soldier. A soldier can't take over someones land and house troops. He would have had to ask for permission to stay on their land and to stay in their home.
It protects an individuals privacy and safety.
How does it protect individual rights?
Why was it included?
How was it relevant in US History?
Example:
Amendment #4 Unreasonable Search and Seizure
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
Amendment Description
Property can not be taken without a reasonable cause or proven permission from items owner.
It protects an individuals rights by making a law to not allow stealing of other peoples things.
How does it protect individual rights?
Why was it included?
How was it relevant in US history?
Example:
Amendment #5 Due Process, Double Jeopardy, and Privacy
No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service in time of war or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.
Amendment Description
The people of the United States have a right to a trial with a jury; but soldiers and other members of the military, do not have the right necessarily to a jury. Amendment #5 protects against "Double Jeopardy" which means you can not be tried for the same crime under the same charges more than once.


This Amendment does not allow the to be tried for the same crime more than once and
private property cannot be taken for the public, without compensation.
How does it protect individual rights?
Why was it included?
How was it relevant in US history?
Example:
Amendment #6

Rights of the Accused
In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.
Amendment Description
Citizens have a right to a "speedy" trial. Of course, many people nowadays do not find the judicial process "speedy" at all, but basically this protects against people being held without knowing what they are being charged with for an excessive amount of time
How does it protect individual rights?
Why was it included?
How was it relevant in US history?
Example:
In suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury, shall be otherwise reexamined in any court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.
Amendment Description
Amendment # 7 Civil Rights to A Jury
How does it protect individual rights?
In civil criminal cases, defendents have a right to a jury of peers. However, this is not true in non-criminal matters and in the military
Why was it included?
How was it relevant in US history?
Example:
Amendment #8 Cruel and Unusual Punishment and Excessive Bail
Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.
Amendment Description
This Amendment protects the people against cruel AND unusual punishment. Basically the punishment must fit the crime. For example if a man shots his neighbors' new puppy with a BB gun on his own property and his neighbor sues and the court determines that part of his sentence is a fine and that the man who shot the dog has to dress up in a dog suit and volunteer for family day at the local dog shelter, it might be unusual, but it is not cruel, and therefore is indeed a suitable punishment in the eyes of the law.

Bail for jail is also determined on a case-by-case basis. If a suspect is considered a huge flight risk, bail will be rather high but for the normal person charged with a petty crime, it should be a reasonable amount considering the charges.

How does it protect individual rights?
Why was it included?
How was it relevant in US history?
Example:
Amendment #9 Protection of Rights
The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.
Amendment Description
It is illegal for the US Government to alter or void the basic principals behind the Constitional Rights. The Patriot Act tried to limit these and that, therefore, is part of the criticism behind the legislature.
How does it protect individual rights?
Why was it included
How was it relevant in US history?
Example:
Amendment #10
Powers of the State and People
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.
Amendment Description
Rights not addressed in the first 10 Amendments will have to be determined by "the people" at a later date.
How does it protect individual rights?
Why was it included?
How was it relevant in US history?
Example:
Without the first amendment, we might not be a civilized nation, and would probably be more the past of these countries Soviet Russia, France and others.
A citizen carrying a weapon makes them safe, they would have the right to use it (depending on the state laws) if they are in danger of dieing.
When the constitution was written, 10 amendments were chosen to be the Bill of Rights because the delegates agreed that these strong laws would make a fare government.
Without the right to carry a firearm we would not be able to protect ourselves and each other from criminals.
It was included in the bill of rights because it's one of the strongest amendments and it specifically describes what one can do for their safety.
In the United States, gun laws have been around almost forever. But recently, gun laws have gotten stricter due to people abusing the law and killing people.
This amendment was included because it was considered to be a very important, then delegates chose it to be one of the 10 amendments.
If there was not a strong amendment for stealing like this one to be out there by the US government, then the nation may
Amendment Description
This allows the government to have a military, allows the citizens to have a weapon with them for those with a appropriate reason, and if the laws are fallowed and not at all breached.
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