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Self Care and Stress Management

Staying Resourceful in Challenging Times
by

Larry Dillenbeck

on 24 May 2016

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Transcript of Self Care and Stress Management

Self Care and
Stress Management
Larry Dillenbeck
What is "Stress?"
“Stress” was originally an engineering term
that meant “demand on the system.”
There are two kinds of stress:
Eustress – Positive Stress. The gentle pressure it takes to get you active and moving.
Distress – Negative Stress. Too much stress.
The body is like a barometer that measures change. It often responds to change the same way whether the change is perceived as good or bad.

The mind interprets what is happening and determines the meaning of the event as being positive or negative.
Three primary ways
we bring on
the stress response:
Reacting to a threat
Adapting to Change
Internal Conflict
Some stress symptoms:
Skin problems
Muscle tension
Tension headaches
Blurred vision
Accidents
Migraine headaches
Stomach problems
Physical
Heart disease
High blood pressure
Adult onset diabetes
Bad breath
Auto immune illnesses
Allergies
Cancer
Viral illnesses – cold, flu, etc.
Mental
Confusion
Preoccupation
Dizziness
Memory loss
Sleep disturbances
Boredom
Anxiety
Nervous gestures
Sexual dysfunction
Irritability
Emotions close to the surface
Depression

Overindulgence:
Sleeping
Eating
Drinking
Work
So what do we
do about it?
The Power of State
Memory
Think of a time
when you had that
state fully available.
Imagination &
Fantasy
Imagine you feel
the way you want
to feel or pretend
you can feel that
way.
Adjust Physiology
Lean forward and get
more involved in the
state or shift your
posture somehow.
Redirect Your
Attention
Change what you are attending
to. Notice sounds instead of what
you're seeing or bring something
into the foreground you weren't
attending to.
Change Intensity
If the state needs a
higher or lower
intensity, play with
imaginary controls
that turn it up or down.
Shift Perceptual
Position
See yourself and/or
the situation from
someone else's point
of view.
Model Someone
Imagine you're someone
else who has easy access
to the state.
Change Body Tempo
Turn a knob to speed
up or slow down your
internal body rhythm.
Change Chunk Size
Experiment with making the chunk size
you're thinking about either larger or smaller.
Music
What tune or piece of music
could you hear inside your
head that would bring on
the state more strongly?
"Smooth seas
do not make
skillful sailors."
- African Proverb
Metaphor
Is there a story, movie,
poem, etc. that elicits
a strong state in you?
Change Submodalities
Requirements for
Successful Anchoring
Intensity of the state
Purity of the state
Timing of the anchor
Accuracy
Framing
and . . .
Reframing
A psychological “Frame” refers to a general focus or direction that provides an overall guidance for thoughts and actions during an interaction.
Psychologically, to “reframe” something means to transform its meaning by putting it into a different framework or context than it has previously been perceived.

The new framework expands our perception of the situation so that it may be more wisely and resourcefully handled.
Change the meaning of the behavior by thinking of a context where the behavior would be useful.
Context Reframing
Context Reframing
Change the meaning of the behavior by thinking of a context where the behavior would be useful.
Think of what else the situation or behavior could mean. Use similar words to describe the situation or behavior but have a more positive or empowering meaning.
Content Reframing
Intent reframing assumes that every behavior is positively intended on some level.
Intent Reframing
What is Stress?
ProQOL Self Assessment
Compassion Satisfaction, Compassion Fatigue and Burnout
The Power of State
Meaning, Framing & Reframing
ABCs and Resilience
. . . and a few extras
ProQOL
Professional Quality of
Life Scale
Compassion Satisfaction
Burnout
A state of physical, emotional
and mental exhaustion resulting
from the stress of interpersonal
contact without relief.
Increased anxiety and/or depression, pessimism
Fatigue, boredom, sleep disturbances
Mentally & physically tired
Lowered emotional control leading to outbursts
Increased alcohol or other drug use
The pleasure you derive from being able
to do your work well. A greater satisfaction
related to your ability to be an effective
care giver.
Compassion
Fatigue
A loss of compassion and
distancing from one's
own caring. The worker
experiences a reduction or
depletion of hope.
Distancing from empathetic connections.
Sense of helplessness
Perception of clients as all the same
Vicarious Trauma
VT refers to the cumulative
impact of distress that clients'
trauma stories have on the
professional. Defined as indirect
exposure to trauma through a
client's firsthand account or
narrative of a traumatic event.
Intrusive recollections of the trauma
Avoidant numbing symptoms
Physiological arousal (brain always working)
Contributing Factors
The Situation
The Helper
Trauma Exposure Response
The ABC's
Awareness
Balance
Connectivity
Mindfulness
and
Meditation

A + B + C = Resilience
*
Thank You!
Ladder of Inference
Lighthouse Center for
Consciousness Studies

Lighthouse Center for
Consciousness Studies
"Research your own experience.
Absorb what is useful,
discard what is useless,
and add what is uniquely your own."
- Bruce Lee
"If you always do
what you've always done,
you'll always get,
what you've always got!"
- NLP Adage
What is Neurolinguistic Programming?
Richard Bandler &
John Grinder
Milton
Erickson
Hypnotherapy
Virginia
Satir
Family
Therapy
Fritz
Perls
Gestalt
Therapy
Neurolinguistic
Programming
Scientific &
Philosophical
Roots
General
Semantics
Alfred
Korzybski
Transformational
Grammar
Noam
Chomsky
Systems
Theory
Gregory
Bateson
Cybernetics
W. Ross
Ashby
Pragmatism
William
James
Phenomenology
Edmund
Husserl
Logical
Positivism
Bertrand
Russell
Alfred North
Whitehead
Logical
Positivism
Reframing
Warm Up
One Word
Reframing
Responsible
Stable
Playful
Frugal
Friendly
Assertive
Respectful
Global
Stable
Comfortable
Flexible

Rigid
Boring
Insincere

Practice - Groups of 3 - A, B & C. Rotate each round.
A - Choose a word and offer to B & C.
B - Think of a similar word with
positive
connotation.
C - Think of a similar word with
negative
connotation.
Reframing
Practice
Groups of 3 or 4
A - Select a problem, issue or complaint.
B & C - Gather information and offer reframes.
What is their positive intent?
What other ways can it be fulfilled?
What else could this mean?
What other contexts would
this be useful or helpful?
What does
it all
mean?
Full transcript