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Dover Beach

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Brandy Razavi

on 24 May 2011

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Transcript of Dover Beach

Dover Beach
By: Matthew Arnold Literary Terms Simile- A figure of speech in which two essentially unlike things are compared, often in a phrase introduced by like or as

Personification- the attribution of human characteristics to things, abstract ideas, etc., as for literary or artistic effect

Aliteration- the use of the same consonant or of a vowel, not necessarily the same vowel, at the beginning of each word or each stressed syllable in a line of verse Example of Similie Lines (21-23)
"The sea of faith was once, too at the full, and round Earth's shore. Lay like the folds of a bright girdle furled." Example of Personfication Line 1
"The sea is calm tonight." Example of Alliteration Line (1-2)
"The sea is calm tonight. The tide is full, the moon lies fair." The sea is calm tonight.
The tide is full, the moon lies fair
Upon the straits; on the French coast the light
Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand;
Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay.
Come to the window, sweet is the night-air!
Only, from the long line of spray
Where the sea meets the moon-blanched land,
Listen! you hear the grating roar
Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling,
At their return, up the high strand,
Begin, and cease, and then again begin,
With tremulous cadence slow, and bring
The eternal note of sadness in.

Sophocles long ago
Heard it on the A gaean, and it brought
Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow
Of human misery; we
Find also in the sound a thought,
Hearing it by this distant northern sea.

The Sea of Faith
Was once, too, at the full, and round earth's shore
Lay like the folds of a bright girdle furled.
But now I only hear
Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar,
Retreating, to the breath
Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear
And naked shingles of the world.


Ah, love, let us be true
To one another! for the world, which seems
To lie before us like a land of dreams,
So various, so beautiful, so new,
Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,
Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;
And we are here as on a darkling plain
Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night. Paraphrasing the poem Lines (21-28)
Since this poem is more or less about religion, I think these lines are talking about how there was a time when faith in God was strong. Faith wrapped itself around us "like a girdle", keeping people from doubt, but as the sea wraps itself around the continents and islands of the world now faith has become a sea of doubt. Science is challenging religion. Theme "But now I only hear
Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar,
Retreating, to the breath
Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear" lines (25-27)

By these few lines I think this shows how the theme of this poem is mainly about how science is challenging religion and how people are losing faith. Descriptive Words Turbid-adj. Thick, dense, or cloudy

Cadence- N. Balanced, rhythmic flow, as of poetry or oratory.

Grating- adj. Sounding harsh or unpleasant Power Words Clash, faith, calm, gleaming, world

I find the most powerful phrase in this poem to be:
"Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night" I find this phrase to be the most powerful
because this shows the conflict going on in
the poem. It shows how people are struggling
to believe what they always have. Matthew Arnold
December 24, 1822 - April 15, 1888 Significant Events in his life... began his career as a poet, winning early recognition as a student at the Rugby School where his father, Thomas Arnold, had earned national acclaim as a strict and innovative headmaster. Arnold also studied at Balliol College, Oxford University. Throughout his thirty-five years as a education inspector Arnold developed an interest in education, an interest which fed into both his critical works and his poetry. Empedocles on Etna (1852) and Poems (1853) established Arnold's reputation as a poet and in 1857 he was offered a position, which he accepted and held until 1867, as Professor of Poetry at Oxford. He was elected Professor of Poetry at Oxford University for ten years in 1857. His poetry was written mostly in the years 1847- 1857 after which he wrote many essays on the need to develop an understanding culture. He was a noted social critic. Connection between the poem and the author? Dover Beach was written in June 1851 following a visit to Dover en route to Europe with his new wife, Lucy Wightman. The poem wasn't published until 1867. Historical Context This poem is during the romantic period and during the time
that there was a social/religious issue happening. This poem is connected
to what Europe was dealing with at the time. How people were questioning
their God. Arnold was an Agnostic and mostly wrote about the social issues
going on in England. S.O.A.P.S.-Tone S- Matthew Arnold is the speaker. "...And we are hereas on a darkling plain. Swept with a confused alarms of struggle and flight." He plainly describes Dover Beach from his point of view no other character is introduced.

O- The occasion is since this is the late 1800's people are using science to challenge what they always believed. Arnold wrote this after his trip to Dover Beach with his wife. "Upon the straits; on the French coast the light
Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand;"

A- I think the audience is European people, displaying what is happening in their society. "Of human misery; we
Find also in the sound a thought,"

P- The puropose of this poem is to inform Europe what is happening during their times, how things are changing. "The Sea of Faith
Was once, too, at the full, and round earth's shore"

S- The subject of this poem is how science is challenging religion. "Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night."

T- The tone of this poem is solemn and enthusiastic. The author changes tones by the end of the poem from describing Dover Beach with calming words to focusing on how society is acting by serious, enthusiastic. Work Cited Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, "Dover Beach." Elements of Literature Sixth Course. Richard Sime. New York City: Harcourt Education Company, 2003. Print. Matthew arnold. (1997). Retrieved from http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/88 Biography of matthew arnold. (n.d.). Retrieved fromhttp://www.poemhunter.com/matthew-arnold/biography/
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