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Week 5: Meaningful Learning (Part 1)

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Chloe Bolyard

on 9 February 2017

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Transcript of Week 5: Meaningful Learning (Part 1)

EDUC 417: Educational Psychology

Week 5, Thursday,
February 9, 2017

Meaningful Learning
(Part 1)

Check-In

How are you today?
Prayer requests
Celebrations

The Big Idea
Agenda
Check-in
Objectives
Meaningful Learning
looking ahead
Sensory Register
How Memory Works
Working/
Short-Term
Memory
Long-Term Memory
Inputs
Attention
Input is unencoded
Large capacity
Short duration
We remember what we pay attention to
We have a limited capacity for attention
Remember that learning requires selectivity
The myth of multitasking

Think-Pair-Share
Think: What works best to get the attention of your students?
What are some strategies you could use to get their attention?
Pair: Find your shoulder partner (the person sitting beside you in your group of 4)
Share: Discuss your ideas
Attended to information goes here
Use it or lose it
Cognitive processing
Making sense of information
Short duration
5-20 seconds
Limited capacity
Rehearsal helps retain information for a bit longer
Declarative knowledge
General knowledge and beliefs about the world
Recollection of past experiences
Things we learn in school

Procedural knowledge
How to perform behaviors (e.g., keyboarding, tying your shoe, riding a bike)

Duration
day, week, month, lifetime

Capacity
Nearly limitless
How do we keep information in our memory?

Elaboration
embellish based on prior knowledge
Organization
Make connections between new pieces of information
Visual Imagery
Forming a mental picture of something
Application
Think of an example related to your subject/grade level for your each type of learning
Group 1: Mikayla, Elissa, & Bri
Group 2: Erin & Mason
Group 3: Lauren & Sydney
Group 4: Sean & Sam

You have ___ minutes to work.
Closure
Think-Pair-Share
Which of the types of meaningful learning strategies do you feel is the easiest to use in your content area/grade level and why?
Which is the most difficult and why?
Looking Ahead
Tuesday, 2/14 (ONLINE)
Read pages 41-55 (meaningful learning, part 2)
Sign up for Mindset article (before leaving)

Looking ahead
2/14 & 2/16 classes are online. Pay attention to instructions on Canvas.
Meaningful learning lesson plan due 2/16
Essential Understanding:
When I know how students remember, I can create learning opportunities that facilitate long-term memory.

Essential Question
: What types of strategies can I use to help students remember what they learn?
Review: How Memory Works
Can you remember the diagram from last class about how our memory works? Be specific. What were the images? What were the associated vocabulary words?

Find your "eyeball" partner, and share what you remember from this diagram. Help each other to fill in the gaps.
Rote Learning
Rehearsal

definition
repeating information verbatim, mentally or aloud
example
word-for-word repetition of a formula or definition
effectiveness
later retrieval is difficult
(learning something without attaching meaning to it)
Meaningful Learning
(recognizing a relationship between new information and prior knowledge)
Elaboration
definition
embellish new information based on prior knowledge
example
generating possible reasons why historical figures made the decisions that they did
effectiveness
effective is associations and additions are appropriate
Organization
definition
pull new info together into an integrated, logical structure
example
group words into categories; form interrelationships
effectiveness
effective if organizational structure is legitimate and consists of more than just a list of facts
Visual Imagery
definition
forming a mental picture of objects or ideas
example
imagining how various characters and events in a novel might have looked
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