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Crisis Communication

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Transcript of Crisis Communication

Review these steps. Has your organization or agency taken any of these steps?

Identify gaps that you may need to address in order to prepare for a crisis. 1. Message
2. Medium
3. Audience Crisis communication
Deals with things that do go wrong Risk & Crisis Communication Designate spokesperson. Crises are nearly always negative.

Crises can change people's perception of the company, industry, or agency involved. Sometimes these can be improper or distorted.

Crises generally takes organization by surprise.

Crises implies lack of control. Common Characteristics of Crises Risk vs.Crisis Communication What is
risk communication? 4. Be honest, frank, and open
5. Work with other credible sources
6. Meet the needs of the media
7. Meet the needs of your employees
8. Speak/communicate clearly and with compassion Sources: Seven Cardinal Rules of Risk Communication by Vincent Covello & Frederick Allen. Know the Five Keys to Risk Management by Lisa Lockridge in Growing Produce. Five Steps to Better Crisis Communications by Carmine Gallo in Bloomberg, Businessweek. 1. Accept and involve public as partner
2. Plan carefully and evaluate efforts
3. Listen to specific concerns of community members General Guidelines for
Risk Communication Before- preparation After- evaluation During- communication A Crisis Communication Plan Checklist 1 2 Identify key audiences. 2 3 4 5 1 3 4 Develop messages and then communicate the messages and
the facts. Anticipate the tough questions. Control the message. Control the flow of information. 5 Keep track of media calls and requests. Respond to the news media. Be active, not reactive. 6 7 Gather information. 11 9 8 12 Centralize information. Do no get angry. Do not get angry. Do not get angry. Stay 'on the record' in all
interviews. No 'no comments". 13 Follow orders, directions, and suggestions. Write everything down. Review these steps. Has your organization or agency taken any of these steps?

Identify gaps that you may need to address in order to communicate during a crisis. 1 2 Review why the crisis
occurred. Evaluate how the crisis
was handled. Examine similar scenarios. 3 Three Elements of
Communicating
a Risk Risk vs. Crisis Risk Crisis Organize a 'what if'
brainstorming session. Select crisis management and
crisis communication teams. 10 Risk communication
Deals with things that might go wrong Provide graphics. 14 Head Body Body Body Body Body Body Body Body Body Body Body Body Do you have a plan? air quality waste management food safety Crisis and Risk informs people
manages potential problems
encourages prudent action
reduces panic Things can go wrong when least
expected. A crisis will happen in
the life of most organizations. Could this happen to you? Agricultural industry example Photo by Larry Korhnak Photo by the South Carolina Forestry Commission Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office Photo by Tara Piasio Edward, Florida Farm Bureau Federation Part I Part II Part III Jim, Florida Cattlemen's Association Scott, Dairy Management, Inc. Consider using our Interview Preparation Guide to help you. Using social media in crisis communications See our social media tool for more information on using social media.

Keep in mind:
Become part of the community.
Have a plan.
Be prepared to engage.
Direct readers to more detailed information about the crisis.
Retweets can repeat and spread inaccurate information.
Rumors and misinformation can spread quickly. Review and Next Steps:

Write down three things you plan to do, after this training, to ensure that your organization or agency will be prepared to effectively communicate if and when a crisis strikes. Telg, R. and T. A. Irani. 2012. Agricultural Communications in Action: A Hands-On Approach.Delmar, Cengage Learning Telg, R. and T. A. Irani. 2012. Agricultural Communications in Action: A Hands-On Approach.Delmar, Cengage Learning Telg, R. and T. A. Irani. 2012. Agricultural Communications in Action: A Hands-On Approach.Delmar, Cengage Learning Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office. Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office. Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office. Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office. Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office. Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office. Photo by Larry Korhnak Photo by kemalbas, istockphoto.com Photo by hh5800, istockphoto.com Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office. Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office. Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office. Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office. Photo courtesy hocus-focus, istockphoto.com Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office. Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office. Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office. Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office. Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office. Photo by selimaksan, istockphoto.com Photo by bowie15 at istockophoto.com Resources and References Covello, V.T. & Allen, F.W. (1988). Seven cardinal rules of risk communication. OPA-87-020. April 1988. http://www.kfa-juelich.de/mut/rc/covall88.html. Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Groth, E. (1998). Risk communication in the context of consumer perceptions of risk. http://www.consumersunion.org/food/riskcomny598.htm. NY: Consumers Union.

Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. (2010). FoodRisk.org. http://www.foodrisk.org. College Park, MD: JIFSAN.

Lundgren, R. & McMakin, A. (2008). Risk communication: A handbook for communicating environmental, safety, and health risks. Columbus, OH: Battelle Press.

Telg, R. and T. A. Irani. 2012. Agricultural Communications in Action: A Hands-On Approach.Delmar, Cengage Learning

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (August 2007). Risk communication in action: The risk communication workbook. www.epa.gov/nrmrl/pubs/625r05003/625r05003.pdf. Washington, DC: EPA. Hogue, J. (2001). Avoiding disaster: The importance of having a crisis plan. http://iml.jou.ufl.edu/projects/Spring01/Hogue/index.html

Fearn-Banks, K. (2002). Crisis communications: A casebook approach. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Earlbaum Associates. Crisis Communication Plan Information Example Crisis Communication Plan Canadian Centre for Emergency Preparedness (2010). http://www.ccep.ca/ccepweb.asp?m=94&ap=3. Burlington, Ontario: CCEP. water quality Photo by Tara Piasio disease irrigation restrictions food contamination wildfire chemical run-off pesticide poisoning natural disaster Plan Review soil erosion Natural resources example 1 2 1 2 Lisa, Director of Public Affairs, Florida Fruit and Vegetable Association; President, Agricultural Institute of Florida. Telg, R. and T. A. Irani. 2012. Agricultural Communications in Action: A Hands-On Approach.Delmar, Cengage Learning Risk Risk Crisis Crisis Photo by the South Carolina Forestry Commission Photo courtesy of Microsoft Office Be active not reactive.
Part II- During Develop messages and then communicate
the messages and the facts.
Part II-During Respond to the news media quickly and fairly.
Part II-During Anticipate the tough questions.
Part I- Before Control the flow of information.
Part II- During Identify key audiences.
Part I- Before Control the message.
Part II- During Review why the crisis occurred.
Part III- After Keep track of media calls and requests.
Part II-During Examine similar scenarios.
Part III-After Do not get angry.
Part II-During
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