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NON-FICTION. Biographies.

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Sophie Vladimirovna

on 11 November 2013

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Transcript of NON-FICTION. Biographies.

NON-FICTION. Biographies.
What's that?
is a subgenre of non-fiction literature; a detailed description or account of a person's life. It entails more than basic facts (education, work, relationships, and death) - a biography also portrays a subject's experience of these events. A biography presents a subject's life story, highlighting various aspects of his or her life, including intimate details of experience, and may include an analysis of the subject's personality.
is written with the permission, cooperation, and at times, participation of a subject or a subject's heirs.

Humphrey Carpenter "Spike Milligan" (2004)
Spike Milligan was one of Britain's best-loved comics as well as one of the most original. In this reassessment of Spike's life and career, biographer Humphrey Carpenter has - through copious research and access to many of those closest to the great man - unearthed a character who could be as difficult and contradictory as he was generous and talented. The creator of The Goons was to influence a whole generation of comics, yet was never to feel fully valued. His periods of depression were matched by periods of high creativity - there were poems, novels, volumes of biography, as well as a television series and a one-man show as Spike searched for his best means of expression. There was also, as revealed here, his inveterate womanising. Married three times and with four children to whom he was devoted, two illegitimate children were to remain barely acknowledged.
Humphrey Carpenter
"The Seven Lives of John Murray" (2008)
From its birth in 1768, when the first John Murray of Edinburgh came down to London, each of the publishing house's seven leaders has made his own contribution to the dissemination of literature and the understanding of the world. One became Byron's publisher and confidante; another began the revolutionary series of Murray handbooks which transformed world travel in the early years of the railways; a third broke controversial new ground with the publication of Queen Victoria's letters. So the tradition progressed to the end of the 20th century, and a list of literary giants including Patrick Leigh Fermor, Osbert Lancaster, Francoise Sagan, and British Poet Laureate, John Betjeman. Written in Carpenter's rollicking and iconoclastic style, it is an affectionate and vibrant account of the longest-surviving publishing house in the world.
Andrea Cagan "Peace Is Possible: The Life and Message of Prem Rawat" (2007)
Peace Is Possible is the first full and complete story of Prem Rawat. It documents his extraordinary life, from growing up with a father who was a revered master, to the day he first addressed audiences at age three, to being discovered by hippies at his home by the Himalayan foothills when he was a child, to his dramatic arrival in the West at thirteen, to today. When Prem Rawat was six years old, his father and beloved teacher showed him a special gift, a practical means to discover a world of peace within him. When he was eight, his father passed away, and he accepted the responsibility of spreading the message of peace. He attended school during the week and addressed audiences in the tens of thousands on weekends. He has spent the last forty years inspiring millions of people from all walks of life and offering this same gift to people. Controversy has not eluded him: he was only eight when the Indian media wrote that he was a sixty-year-old posing as a child. Few journalists have gone beyond stereotypes and taken the time to get a real sense of what he offers. While his message is translated into more than seventy languages, it remains a little-known secret, spread mostly through word of mouth. This book lifts the veil on Prem Rawat--the man, his life, his message.
A biography of Abraham Lincoln written by Thomas DiLorenzo in 2002. Unlike most books on the subject, DiLorenzo's presents a severely critical view of Lincoln's presidency.
In discussing Lincoln's legacy, DiLorenzo cites the suspension of habeas corpus, violations of the First Amendment, war crimes committed by generals in the American Civil War, and the expansion of government power. DiLorenzo argues that Lincoln's views on race exhibited forms of bigotry that are commonly overlooked today[specify](See Abraham Lincoln on slavery). DiLorenzo also argues that Lincoln instigated the American Civil War not over slavery but rather to centralize power and to enforce the strongly protectionist Morrill Tariff; similarly, he criticizes Lincoln for his strong support of Henry Clay's American System.

Thomas James DiLorenzo
"The Real Lincoln: A New Look at Abraham Lincoln, His Agenda, and an Unnecessary War" (2003)
Michael Holroyd "A Strange Eventful History: The Dramatic Lives of Ellen Terry, Henry Irving and their Remarkable Families" (2008)

Henry Irving - a merchant's clerk who became the saviour of British theatre - and Ellen Terry, who made her first theatre appearance as soon as she could walk, were the king and queen of the Victorian stage. Creatively interdependent, they founded a power-house of arts at the Lyceum Theatre, with Bram Stoker as business manager, where they recast Shakespeare's plays on an epic scale and took the company on lucrative and exhilarating international tours. In his masterly new biography, award-winning writer Michael Holroyd explores their public and private lives, showing how their artistic legacy and their brilliant but troubled children came to influence the modern world.
Weaving together intimate details from Katherine Mansfield's letters and journals with the writings of her friends and acquaintances, Kathleen Jones creates a captivating drama of this fragile yet feisty author: her life, loves and passion for writing. The story takes us beyond Mansfield's death in 1923 to explore the life of her husband, John Middleton Murry - and his relationship with three further wives - as he manipulated the posthumous publication of Mansfield's unpublished work. In this vivid portrayal of one of the world's foremost short story writers, the first new biography for a quarter of a century, Kathleen Jones crafts an intriguing narrative of Katherine Mansfield's relationships, illnesses and creativity.
Kathleen Jones "Katherine Mansfield: The Story-Teller" (2010)

Hermione Lee
"Edith Wharton" (2007)
The first biography of Edith Wharton by a British woman writer, it challenges the accepted view, showing Wharton's lifelong ties to Europe and displaying her as a tough, erotically brave, startlingly modern writer and woman.
Brenda Maddox "Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA" (2002)
Brenda Maddox tells a powerful story of a remarkably single-minded, forthright, and tempestuous young woman who, at the age of fifteen, decided she was going to be a scientist, but who was airbrushed out of the greatest scientific discovery of the twentieth century.
Morton's book describes Cruise's relationship with Katie Holmes, his sexuality, and Cruise and Holmes' beliefs.
Andrew Morton
"Tom Cruise: An Unauthorized Biography" (2008)
Robert Lacey "Monarch, Life and Reign of Elizabeth II" (2002)
For more than fifty years, Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor -- who became Elizabeth II, Queen of England on February 6, 1952 -- has been loved and loathed, revered and feared, applauded and criticized by her people. Still she endures as a captivating figure in the world's most durable symbol of political authority: the British monarchy.
In Monarch, a meticulously detailed portrait of Elizabeth II as both a human being and an institution, bestselling author Robert Lacey brings the queen to life as never before: as baby "Lilibet" learning to wave to a crowd in the Royal Mews; as a child "ardently praying for a brother" so as to avoid her fate; as a young woman falling in love with and marrying her cousin Philip; and as the mother-in-law of the most complicated royal of all, Princess Diana.
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