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Digital Scrapbook

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Marissa Little

on 16 June 2015

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Transcript of Digital Scrapbook

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Social Issues
Article 1: The Supreme Court Could Make Abortion One of 2016's Big Campaign Issues
Issue Overview and Course Connections

The laws of abortion around the world are unique to the countries or regions they occur in. In the United States, more and more people, whether it be regular citizens or leaders, are trying to abolish the legality of abortions, by eliminating as many abortion clinics as possible. Their attempt has been successful so far, as Mississippi's only abortion clinic is on the verge of shutting down, as well as other states have strict laws in place that limit the availability of an abortion. The biggest debate for abortion legality, discussed in this article, is in Texas. Rick Perry, the former Texas governor, signed the draconian law two years ago, which was upheld last week, and now threatens to shut down two thirds of the states abortion clinics. Lawyers can now fight the Texas law and demand they take up the case. If all goes accordingly, clinics could start shutting down as soon as spring of 2016. This is an example of the social problems that we learned in this course. In Unit 1, we discussed World Trends. Among all the world trends we discussed, human rights was a big topic of discussion. Is a fetus in the womb considered living? Do they deserve the same rights as we do? Who has the right to decide these things? What makes this a social issue, is that there is no consensus on what is right and wrong, or why. As long as there is this polarization, and no meeting ground from a negotiation standpoint for these groups, you will find people who recruit people into their social clique to reinforce their beliefs on others. One group believes the idea of abortion is immoral, while the other promotes the rights of the woman to decide. We learned about issues that have an influence on all of society, and this is one of them.
Social Issues
Article 1: The Supreme Court Could Make Abortion One of 2016's Big Campaign Issues
Key Stakeholders
Rick Perry-
Rick Perry is the former Texas Governor. He signed into law the abortion limits two years ago, that were not passed until recently. The ruling held that the law, HB 2, which requires abortion facilities to comply with hospital-like standards, does not pose an undue burden for the majority of women seeking abortion in Texas, millions of whom will now have to travel hundreds of miles for an abortion.

The Supreme Court-
the highest judicial court in the United States. Ultimately, they will be the deciding factor on the abortion laws in Texas. They will be responsible for taking into consideration whether states the can use clinic regulations to make abortion unavailable to millions of women.

Citizens of Texas-
this affects Texas citizens, because many surveys and polls have been taken to see how they feel about the new laws. It also affects them, because if the people of Texas disagree with the new law potentially being passed, they will not vote for the party in power.
Social Issues
Article 1: The Supreme Court Could Make Abortion One of 2016's Big Campaign Issues
p
Contributing Factors
The
cultural/social
issue involved with abortion, is that it influences society into being on one side or the other. It is something that society feels needs to be resolved. Therefore, pro-life supporters would like to see abortion illegal, while pro-choice supporters would like to see it legal. Because of the polarization, there will never be an equal medium. The
political issue
involved with this article, is the controversy of abortion debated within the political system. It is the government's responsibility to create laws based on the rights of all but it is topics like this that make it difficult. "Is a fetus a living being? Do they deserve the same rights?" It is up to the government to make that decision on behalf of all of society, and it is usually justified, but not always.
Social Issues
Article 1: The Supreme Court Could Make Abortion One of 2016's Big Campaign Issues
Implications
The social/cultural impacts of the issue now, and in the future, are angry citizens. No matter what the Supreme Court decides, one side will be upset. If the Supreme court does pass the law, the pro-choice supporters will be enraged. If they do not pass the law, the pro-life supporters will be equally upset. The political impacts will be similar to the social and cultural one- it is up to the government to make decisions based on the well-being of society, but either way one side will be upset. The party in power, along with the Supreme Court, will have to face society and justify their decisions. Finally, there are also economical impacts. If the law does pass, the economy will drop. Clinics will be closed which will decrease revenue, and many of people will be without jobs.
Social Issues
Article 1: The Supreme Court Could Make Abortion One of 2016's Big Campaign Issues
Bias
There is a bias present in the article, because she implicitly gives her opinion. Firstly, there is a tone to the article that states that people will be upset if the law passes. This implies, that she will also be upset. She does this by quoting someone who clearly favors one side of this controversy. "I don't think voters are going to want a president who is going to appoint more Scalias and Thomases to the court." She is also a woman, and it could therefore be considered bias because the law will be limiting the rights of a woman, which is a convincing reason to be in opposition to the law. It affects the way the information is presented, because people will have a hard time differentiating what is actual fact, and what is her opinion.
Economic Issues

Article 2: Action on Climate Change Cheaper Than Inaction
1 of 2 articles presented in the course

Issue Overview and Course Connections
The topic of discussion in this article is climate change. It discusses how despite contrary belief, the costs of taking action in regards to climate change will be much less than the costs of inaction. Although mitigation does cost money, it does not cost nearly as much as the damages that will arise from inaction towards climate change in 2100 and 2200. They also discuss all the benefits: conservation of nature, the air will be cleaner, etc. They even discussed some geopolitical benefits, and how less reliance on fossil fuels could help reduce military and geopolitical involvement in other parts of the world, which itself is expensive. This is an example of economic issues presented in the class, because we learned that you have to make the best use of limited resources. As we learned in class, in Unit 4, it is necessary to manage resources. We also learned about environmental issues like climate change and how it can have an affect on the development of a region. Finally, we learned about geopolitics, and how it focuses on the political, economical, physical, and social interactions between the nations of the world.
Economic Issues
Article 2: Action on Climate Change Cheaper Than Inaction
Key Stakeholders
Political Leaders-
Political leaders have the greatest influence on this economic issue, because it is up to them to take action and realize the severity of the situation of the earth. They are the ones who need to do what's best for society as they have the power to do it.

Environmentalists-
It is up to the environmentalists to continue to release reports like these and emphasize how vital it is that we act now. If they stress it enough, the government may take action sooner rather than later.





Economic Issues
Article 2: Action on Climate Change Cheaper Than Inaction
Contributing Factors
The
economic factors
that are contributing to the issue of climate change are the fact that we are investing too much in services that directly result in climate change, ie- burning fossil fuels for electricity, heat, and transportation. This burning of fossil fuels results in pollution in the air and atmosphere, which is a
environmental factor
as well. Finally,
the political factors
that are causing climate change are the things that the government allow to happen. For example, deforestation. The government is responsible for deforestation and it is among one of the many causes of climate change. Government should also feel the need to take responsibility. They are expected to ensure the well-being of society, yet climate change is the exact opposite.
Economic Issues
Article 2: Action on Climate Change Cheaper Than Inaction
Implications
The economic impacts of climate change are clear. If nothing changes, the costs of damages will be immensely high, $70 trillion dollars to be exact. With action, however, that number is less than half. The environmental factors, are that it will be in the worst condition it has ever been. The air will be extremely polluted, to the point where it can harm humans. Deforestation will also harm environments that are habitable for animals. Also, the political impacts are that when the damages do occur, it will be the government's responsibility to fix all of the damages. Whether it be health care for people who get sick from the pollution, paying for the environmental damages (some evidence suggests that droughts have been occurring more frequently because of climate change and they are expected to become more frequent) it is ultimately a political issue.
Economic Issues
Article 2: Action on Climate Change Cheaper Than Inaction
Bias
The article is biased, because while they do have some facts, not everything they say is justified. For example, "They often assume (or hope) the consequences will not be as bad as scientists are predicting." The author has no proof that the countries of the world assume these things, but he says it anyways to support his argument. This affects the way the information is presented because it is misleading, and people will question the credibility of the entire article.
Political Issues
Article 3: Where next for Libya?
Issue Overview and Course Connections
This article talks about the current situation in Libya. The author discusses how Libya has been in a state of turmoil since the 2011 Civil War, and the recent attacks from ISIS has only made matters worse. He explains that Libya may be looking at further lost generations of Libyans as the education system, the health system, the economy and the lives of ordinary Libyans fall apart and unpalatable forces continue to exploit the chaos that is Libya today. However, he also discusses some solutions that could get Libya back on track. He explains that behind it all, there is growing evidence of a movement in Libya that offers a different track towards a functioning democratic state. The people are ready to work at it and they are showing this by becoming more engaged in elections, showing more interest and concern towards their country, and the author believes in this. He says "There is growing support on the ground for the idea that an orderly transition to a new Libya may be best served by returning to the constitution that founded the Libyan nation and secured its independence." In Unit 2, we discussed the rise of ISIS and the affect it has on so many Middle Eastern countries. We also learned about international intervention, and how it is not always justified. Why was the U.S government willing to help Libya, but when Syria was attacked, they did nothing? With an already flawed government, countries like Libya are prone to attacks by terrorist groups. We also discussed current world trends, and an example was peace, war, and conflict. These can all have an affect on a country's development, and that is unfortunately the case in Libya. In order for Libya to at least look towards development, they need to ensure the well-being of everyone (health care, education, etc.)
Political Issues
Article 3: Where next for Libya?
Key Stakeholders
The UN-
An intergovernmental organization established after World War 2 to promote international co-operation. Their number one responsibility is to protect the international community. Libya included, therefore they must do whatever they can to ensure the protection of Libya.

Libyan Government-
The Libyan government needs to become more stable. There are essentially no laws in Libya- no national police force, no working judiciary, no coherent government. Assassinations, kidnappings, rival militias battling on the streets, ISIS setting up camps, and above all a weak government have all made Libya an extremely dangerous place. They need to change this because they are accountable for the welfare of their people.

Libyan Citizens-
The Libyan citizens are also responsible because they need to take some of this into their own hands. If they fight for their rights, stop worrying about guns and war, the government will have no choice but to hear their voice. Whether they act upon it or not they have no control over, but they can still make an effort.

Other Countries-
Other countries can include countries like the USA, Canada, Australia, etc. They have the military, the money, the equipment, and the ability to help other countries in need. Globalization. Interdependence. Being mutually dependent on each other and helping each other whenever they are able to.



Political Issues
Article 3: Where next for Libya?
Contributing Factors
An example of
cultural factors
that fuel the issue, are the constant wars and conflict that are happening all around. This is a cultural factor, because it has an influence on society and it has an impact on their opinions. The constant fighting makes people in Libya feel like this is the norm. It influences them into thinking there is nothing left that they can do. A
political issue
, is the lack of law enforcement. This leads to the issue of an unstable Libyan country, because it is the government's responsibility to ensure the safety and well-being of their people; however, not only is there no health care or education system, people are dying from the ISIS attacks and the government is not doing anything sufficient enough to stop it. The
economic factors
that influence the issue, is how financially unstable Libya is. Libya is an undeveloped country, and more notably, extremely poor. As I said before, without proper services like education and health care that they can not afford, the Libyan people are in desperate need. With the ISIS attacks on top of that, they can not afford protection, a military to defend themselves, etc. Instead, they need to rely on the help from other countries. This is not always reliable, which allows ISIS to continue to damage and harm other countries.
Political Issues
Article 3: Where next for Libya?
Implications
The cultural impact of the injustices happening in Libya, is the attacks on certain meaningful places in their country. The premeditated destruction targets various places of worship, and ancient historical artifacts. ISIS has taken over large parts of their land, and it makes Libyans feel like there is nothing they can do. When they fight back, they get killed. If they do nothing, they continue to be a victim. The political impact of the chaos in Libya, is that the Libyan government has to really try to put their country back together. Before they can do that, they need to stop ISIS. In order to stop ISIS, the Libyan government needs to recruit different countries for help, and reach out to the UN. Finally, the economic impacts of the issue presented in the article, are that in order for Libya to defeat ISIS, and get back on their feet towards development, they need money. Their economy is extremely low, and it can not improve until the needs of the people are met first. This means education, health care, employment, etc. If they can defeat ISIS with the help of others, they can start to spend their money on services for the welfare of their citizens, instead of weapons and tactics to fight ISIS.
Political Issues
Article 3: Where next for Libya?
Bias
There is definitely bias present in this article, and you can identify it easily. The author is trying to over-prove his point, therefore a lot of his sources are not credible. For example, "the last nationwide vote
I believe
had only 15 to 20 per cent of the electorate voting" He said "I believe" meaning that he is not actually certain of that statistic, it could be completely wrong. Also, he speaks on behalf of Libyans more than once. "I believe that the majority of ordinary Libyans today would agree that it is due to this –" and "It is astonishing to me and to many Libyans how," therefore, he is strongly opinionated and tries to convince people to believe him by connecting with the Libyan people. This could affect the way the information is presented because being such an important topic, readers will start to question the author and whether or not the Libyans really agree with him, or he is just saying that to support his argument.
2 of 2 articles presented in this course
Environmental Issues
Article 4: Climate change could kill off 1 in 6 of Earth’s species, says study
Issue Overview and Course Connections
This is one of the articles we already analyzed in class, and it talks about the risks of climate change. Instead of the economic risks of climate change like I previously talked about, this article is about the environmental risks, and more specifically- the risks for wildlife. The article states that without action against climate change- 5.2% of all species in the world could be extinct. Furthermore, as time progresses, 1 in 6 species is at a risk of being wiped out completely. Some species are in more danger than others, and some countries are more prone to this than others (Australia, New Zealand, South America,) but it will ultimately affect everyone. However, it also discusses measures we can take to prevent wildlife extinction, for example, we can begin to constrain/regulate greenhouse gas emissions. People can also start to identify the species that need most help offer priority to them. In class, we discussed the many reasons why so many issues related to the environment have developed, including the overuse of natural resources. We also learned about how different eco-regions can be more susceptible to climate change. Whether it is the geographic location, the climactic region or the environmental challenges this environment faces, they all adapt to climate change differently. Lastly, we also discussed how the geographic location and condition of the environment can even have an affect on the development of a region (ex: dry environment, low supply of crop, less food and work.)
Environmental Issues

Article 4: Climate change could kill off 1 in 6 of Earth’s species, says study
Key Stakeholders
Political Leaders-
Political leaders have the greatest influence on this environmental issue, because it is up to them to take action and realize the severity of the situation of the earth. They are the ones who need to do what's best for society as they have the power to do it. President's, Prime Ministers, etc, all have a voice and are very influential. If they explain the urgency and demand change, it will occur. Their stance on the issue; however, is that they do not see how much damage it will cost so they could not be bothered with it.

Environmentalists-
It is up to the environmentalists to continue to release articles like this and emphasize how vital it is that we act now. If they stress it enough, the political leaders may take action sooner rather than later. They can also try to do small things that will help in a big way. It is obvious that they need help from authority, but they should continue to try on their own, for example, finding the most vulnerable species and their habitats and ensuring all their needs are met.
Environmental Issues
Article 4: Climate change could kill off 1 in 6 of Earth’s species, says study
Contributing Factors
The
environmental factors
are the most obvious. All the pollution that the environment unfortunately receives, contributes to the climate change. Everything we do as humans to contaminate the earth plays a role in climate change. The
economic factors
, are the money that we spend on institutions and factories that are the leading cause for climate change and global warming. Greenhouse gas emission is the worst thing for the Earth but it is released into the atmosphere every single day. If you purchased a car, you are contributing to the economic factors that produce climate change because the gas released from the car is extremely harmful for the environment. There are always alternatives (electric cars.) Lastly, the
political factors
that fuel this issue are the constant investment in the factories I just talked about. Everyone is aware of how harmful they are to the environment, everyone is aware that there are alternative methods, yet the government continues to invest in these things that will not only harm the planet but humans as well. Why? Because it is cheaper. The role the government plays is to guarantee the welfare of society, but the only thing they have guaranteed is allowing the damages of climate change to occur.
Environmental Issues
Article 4: Climate change could kill off 1 in 6 of Earth’s species, says study
Implications
The environmental impact of the issue, is ultimately the loss of lives. Climate change will target more vulnerable species and their habitats, the amount of floods, droughts, storms, and other natural disasters will be significantly higher, and so much more. Climate change is extremely harmful for not just animals, but for humans as well. The severity of it will only be understood when it's happening and it's too late to fix it. The economic impact, is that the government will have to spend more money repairing damages of climate change, than they would have spending money on measures to prevent it (double, actually.) Finally, the political impact, is that not only would they have to spend twice the money, but so much time trying to fix everything. If it was prevented, they could focus on more important things like crime, poverty, etc. Also, if the frequency of natural disasters increase, not only will they have to spend time and money cleaning up, but also repairing homes, giving comfort to families, etc. In my opinion, it is easier, safer, quicker, and cheaper, to take preventative measures over waiting for a disaster to happen, and then trying to control it. This issue would also have social impacts, because it would influence society and make them question the government and why they did not act upon the climate change threats sooner.
Environmental Issues
Article 4: Climate change could kill off 1 in 6 of Earth’s species, says study
Bias
Some indicators of bias in the article, is that the language of the document is extreme. His statements have all or nothing connotations, by saying we literally have no choice but to take action against climate change. It affects the way the information is presented because it may intimidate people, and gives off the impression that his information could over-dramatized, and therefore inaccurate.
Cultural Issues
Article 5: The Big Problem With Outlawing Gender Conversion Therapies
Issue Overview and Course Connections
This article talks about the issues with having to characterize yourself as one gender. At a young age, you are pretty much forced to decide whether you are a boy or a girl. Whether you are straight, gay, or bisexual. The author talks about how when children are developing their gender identities, over-simplifying gender can be especially harmful, as a nudge in one direction or another, while children are still developing, might forever change their life, as it is possible you could accidentally steer them to a transgender path they might otherwise not want or need to take. She discusses Bill 77, an Ontario law yet to be passed, that aims to prohibit any clinical practice that “seeks to change or direct the sexual orientation or gender identity of a patient under 18 years of age, including efforts to change or direct the patient’s behavior or gender expression.” The only thing wrong with this, the author says, is that it forces children to make the decision when maybe they are not ready yet, and that can change their lives forever. This means, not pressing a child to tell us what gender and sexual orientation they “really are,” because it does not matter. They can decide when they are ready to. She argues that there is no reason to label yourself as a certain gender, as long as you are yourself. This is such an important cultural issue because modern culture in a developed, innovative society, is always telling you to label yourself. The author argues that if children are forced to label themselves, they will do it as something they would not have otherwise were they not forced, and it is one of the most common factors of bullying and depression among teens. In this class, we learned about human rights, and this is definitely one of them. Everyone deserves the right to decide (or not decided) their gender when they feel ready. Children should not be forced by the law, or by their parents, to tell a doctor what gender they think they are. They should do it when their ready, and even if they do think they're ready, no Bill 77 should exist to make sure that that is the gender they are and will identify themselves with from then on. We talked about World Youth in this course, and how we all are entitled to the same human rights.
Cultural Issues
Article 5: The Big Problem With Outlawing Gender Conversion Therapies
Key Stakeholders
Parents-
Whether parents agree or disagree, they can not force their kids into labeling themselves as such a young age. And if a child does chose to label themselves, as a parent they have to accept their child with this decision, whether or not it changes. Each parent has a different opinion on the issue, but ultimately, accept your child for who they are and the decisions they make.

Government-
The Ontario Bill 77 that has yet to pass as a law, should definitely not be passed. Not only does it make children label themselves at an age when they are still exploring themselves, but it also more or less tells children that they must be careful with what they label themselves as because once they do it, they can not change. The government's stance is they want to make sure children chose and not their parents, when really, children should not have to chose at all. Not until they are ready.

Doctors-
Doctors and pediatricians are often given the responsibility to ask children their sexuality, and often times if they feel they fit properly with the gender they were born with. This way of doing things is flawed. Instead of asking (or assuming) doctors should wait until the child comes to them instead. Asking them questions that they never considered before could result in rash decisions that they never would have made otherwise, changing their entire lives. Doctors are supposed to help their patients, but when they ask for it.

Society-
Society's stance on this issue is that for the most part, they believe that people should be the gender they were born with. This is why people are often judged based on their sexuality or gender, and are also likely to be bullied. Even though it should not, the opinions of others can even stop someone from defining themselves as who they really are.
Cultural Issues
Article 5: The Big Problem With Outlawing Gender Conversion Therapies
Contributing Factors

Firstly, a
social/cultural factor
that causes this issue is expectations. Society has expectations and standards and if you do not meet them, you're often judged. Parents sometimes feel ashamed that their child does not feel like they were meant for the body they were born in, so they try to tell them that maybe it's "just a phase," or "they will grow out of it." The
political factor
that causes this issue is labeling. With the Bill 77 law, the government wants you to label yourself male or female. Some don't know and some are not ready to decide; however, the government forces children into choosing. That child maybe never even thought of themselves as another gender, but now that they've been asked, they might make a decision that they otherwise should not have made. What these issues have in common, is a demand to be placed in a category. Gay, lesbian, straight, bisexual, transgender, female, male. They want an answer, even if some children don't understand the question.
Cultural Issues
Article 5: The Big Problem With Outlawing Gender Conversion Therapies
Implications
The most common social/cultural impact of the issue is bullying. It's as simple (and unfortunate) as being discriminated against for being yourself. This discrimination not only denies LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) people equal access to key social goods, such as employment, health care, education and housing, but it also marginalizes them in society and makes them one of the vulnerable groups who are at risk of becoming socially excluded. The most common political impact of the issue, is that it is the government's responsibility to guarantee the safety and well-being of everyone. No one is legally allowed to be discriminated based on their sexuality or gender, so it is the law officials job to make sure that their rights are recognized and respected.
Cultural Issues
Article 5: The Big Problem With Outlawing Gender Conversion Therapies
Bias
This article has more than one example of bias in it. Firstly, she has no real factual data. Most of her arguments are using anecdotes, which shows that she's making it more personal. She also makes it even more personal when she discusses hypothetical situations, which may or not be hypothetical. She first says "Let’s put a real face on this issue—a thirty-something person I’m going to call Jess," but then she goes on through the article to continuously quote "Jess." This affects the way the information is presented because it makes people question the authenticity of the article and what portion is factual and what is her personal thoughts. Lastly, she announces in the article that "Jess and I know each other through our professional interests in
advancing the rights of LGBT people.
" Therefore, her opinion is one sided, because she does not consider the non-supporters opinions.
Cultural Issues
Article 6: Twelve things women in Saudi Arabia can't do
Issue Overview and Course Connections
This article talks about what the women of Saudi Arabia are prohibited to do/do not have the right to do. The list of things is long, and includes driving a car, voting in elections, wearing clothes that reveal skin, go swimming, compete freely in sports, try on clothes when shopping, and many others. The article then explains the reasons why the women in Saudi Arabia are not entitled to any of these things. The general answer, can be summarized by the word culture. It is their culture for women to be treated as a minority to men. It is the norm in their culture for a woman to have to go everywhere with her husband. Just because they accept it, does not mean they wish things weren't different. This cultural norm that I'm talking about, is a reoccurring theme presented this year. In the beginning of the course, we studied global classification systems. We were able to observe living conditions in many countries like Saudi Arabia and discovered their cultural norms and rights of citizens. Further on in the course, we studied development, including the basic needs of society. Equal rights, was among those basic needs, which the women in Saudi Arabia deserve.
Cultural Issues
Article 6: Twelve things women in Saudi Arabia can't do
Key Stakeholders
The Saudi Arabian Government-
The Saudi Arabian Government is responsible for the laws in place. Their stance on the issue is that it is not even an issue. In their opinion, it is socially and culturally right for women to be inferior to men.

The UN-
The United Nations, An intergovernmental organization established after World War 2 to promote international co-operation. Their number one responsibility is to protect the international community, including the women of Saudi Arabia. It is their responsibility to guarantee their rights, or at least try to.

The Islamic Mosque-
The Islamic Mosque is also a stakeholder because their religion/culture influences their rights. For example, the Qur'an says that men are a degree above women in status.
Cultural Issues

Article 6: Twelve things women in Saudi Arabia can't do
Contributing Factors
The
cultural/social factors
fueling the issue is the norm/expectation. It is hard to change tradition, and that is the way things have always been in Saudi Arabia. It is socially acceptable and there is no reason to question it. Their culture/religion further fuels the issue because their book of worship also says that husbands are a degree above their wives in a legal and domestic context. Therefore, it fuels the issue because the women do not want to go against this.
The political factors
that are causing the issue is that the unfortunate circumstances mentioned in the article are the law for Saudi Arabians, if it is not changed, they really have no choice but to abide by these laws. There are consequences not only if they go against the Qur'an but also if they break the law.
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Cultural Issues
Article 6: Twelve things women in Saudi Arabia can't do
Implications
The social/cultural impacts of the issue are that there is no opportunity for females to contribute or have an influential voice in the country's culture or society. Since Saudi Arabian women lack independence, they are unable to truly define themselves in society. They are being forced to hold back their intelligence and therefore not being given the chance to contribute to their cultures and societies as they are more than capable of doing. The political impacts of the lack of rights for Saudi Arabian women is that they can not vote and therefore only males opinions are considered. Also, the Saudi Arabian government can be considered corrupt because it does not take everyone's views into consideration.
Cultural Issues

Article 6: Twelve things women in Saudi Arabia can't do
Bias
There is obviously some bias in the article, and the first indication of it is the fact that it is a magazine article. Magazine articles are often over-exaggerated to encourage people to keep reading. Therefore, it is not completely reliable.
Canadian Issues
Article 7: Aboriginal people may lose patience if report doesn’t stir action
Issue Overview and Course Connections
In early June, Canadian commissioners met with survivors of the Canadian Indian Residential School system, a network of boarding schools for Native Canadians (Metis, Inuit, First Nations.) These were not just schools, they caused significant harm to Aboriginal children who attended them by removing them from their families, depriving them of their ancestral languages, through sterilization, and by exposing many of them to physical leading to sexual abuse by staff members, and other students. The article also talks about the lack of Canadian government staff. For example, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, the Health Minister and the Justice Minister were all absent. Even more surprisingly, the Environmental Minister, Leona Aglukkaq, did not make an appearance. She’s a residential school survivor herself, and was expected to attend to provide support, but instead she posted a status on Facebook, congratulating the people who came forward for their bravery. Overall, the author discusses all the injustices that Native Canadians used to, and still do face. The theme of human rights has been present in every unit, from Global Classification systems, to development. In order for a country to properly develop, you need to guarantee the welfare of
everyone.
Canadian Issues
Article 7: Aboriginal people may lose patience if report doesn’t stir action
Key Stakeholders
Canadian Government-
The Canadian Government is a key stakeholder because they are the ones responsible for the issue. They claim their stance is to try and fix the issue and try to repair the damage already done, however they have not shown that. The meeting earlier this month was a perfect time to show how they care but Stephen Harper was not in attendance.

Aboriginal People-
The aboriginal people are also a key stakeholder because they are the ones suffering the discrimination. The louder they speak out about it and the more frequently they do it, the more likely the government will do something.

Canadian Society-
Canadian society is also a stakeholder because we all make up society. As said in the article, most of our society says the aboriginal people need to "get over it," however, if they did, the government would continue to treat them unfairly. Society complains that they don’t want their hard-earned money spent on aboriginal issues; however, if the Canadian government did not treat the aboriginal people so poorly and inhumanely in the first place, the taxes would not go to them. They're blaming the wrong people.




Canadian Issues
Article 7: Aboriginal people may lose patience if report doesn’t stir action
Contributing Factors
The
political factors
causing the issue, are that they do not care enough. And if they do, they don't show it. The Canadian Government is responsible for the horrible things they put aboriginal people through, and now it is their responsibility to fix it. It would have been nice to see PM Stephen Harper and his ministers sitting in the audience on Tuesday, surrounded by the survivors. In an era politics and economy, it would have sent a clear message that this is at least being taken seriously. Or that their voices have been heard.
The social/cultural factors
causing the issue, are how they were, and are, being treated differently. At the time these horrors occurred in the early-mid 1900s, aboriginal people were not equal in society. Mostly Christian (and white) based, the schools did not allow the aboriginal children to be themselves. To practice their culture. They were forced to speak English, and punished for being themselves.
Canadian Issues
Article 7: Aboriginal people may lose patience if report doesn’t stir action
Implications
The political implications of the issue are angry and frustrated aboriginal people. It is the government's responsibility to guarantee everyone's safety and welfare, and the aboriginal people feel the government is not doing their job. They are going to keep fighting the government for more protection, until they actually listen. The social/cultural implications, is seclusion. They chose to separate themselves from society, and live on reservations. Those reserves are the only part of the land that the government hasn't stole from them. When the government committed genocide on a majority of the Aboriginal people, the rest, in order to avoid the wiping out the race of Native Canadians, were forced onto reservation. Now, Native Canadians see no point in leaving the reservations because they still feel like victims of the government.
Canadian Issues
Article 7: Aboriginal people may lose patience if report doesn’t stir action
Bias
Bias in this article is clear, when the author shares their personal experiences. Although she admits she is white, she explains her life in the Canadian Indian Residential School's, and how it is much different from what the natives had to endure. This affects the way the information is presented, because since she may have just seen the worst of things, and based all her information on what she saw alone. Also, because she saw all the injustice, she might have a one-sided opinion, and not consider anything else. Also, the argument appeals more to the emotions than to logic, which is often a sign of bias.
Canadian Issues
Article 8: Minimum Wage in Canada Not Enough to Live On, Report Finds
Issue Overview and Course Connections
This article discusses the issue of minimum wage in Canada, and how it is not enough to live on or support a family with. The author explains that most people assume that people working with minimum wage jobs are teenagers looking for extra money, but studies show that almost 40% of minimum wage employees are over the age of 25. Moreover, the report also found that "six in ten women are minimum wage workers, which Suprovich attributes to the fact that women are more commonly working in non-unionized workplaces and in turn have lower wages." This gender inequality is still apparent today, even in Canada. Poverty rates have sky-rocketed, and the government is responsible. Although over time minimum wage is constantly increasing, it can not keep up with the expenses of living in Canada. It discusses that even full-time employment does not guarantee an escape from poverty. The author makes an important statement, "It is time to evaluate what our society deems fair, and compensate minimum wage workers accordingly.” This is clearly a Canadian Issue, because although we are a developed country, there are people who still live in poverty. We discussed this when we learned about world trends, development, interdependence, global classification systems, etc.
Canadian Issues
Article 8: Minimum Wage in Canada Not Enough to Live On, Report Finds
Key Stakeholders
The Canadian Government-
The Canadian Government is a key stakeholder because they are responsible for the low income minimum wage. Their stance on the issue is obvious; they thinks it is reasonable.

Employers-
Although the government is responsible for such a low minimum wage, employers are responsible for what they pay their employees. Therefore, even though minimum wage is $11.00 in Ontario, does not mean the employer is obligated to pay their employees at that rate- they choose to.

Overall, they are both equally responsible for this issue because minimum wage has become suddenly not sufficient enough, because the expenses of living have increased significantly.
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Canadian Issues
Article 8: Minimum Wage in Canada Not Enough to Live On, Report Finds
Contributing Factors
The cultural/social factors
of the issue, are that minimum wage jobs attract certain kinds of people. Teenagers, immigrants, uneducated, drug/alcohol addicts, etc. These types of people are known in society for having minimum wage jobs, which is why the wage is so low.
The economic factors
that fuel the issue, are that our economy can simply not afford to increase the minimum wage. So many jobs are minimum wage jobs, so increasing it for everyone would be hard on the economy. Finally,
the political factors
that fuel the issue, are that the government justifies minimum wage by saying that minimum wage jobs are usually entry-level, or temporary jobs. They do not require experience, so they are more geared towards teenagers and young adults just starting out. However, because some people can not afford education, they have no choice but to continue with these minimum wage jobs, so the government gets away with it.
Canadian Issues
Article 8: Minimum Wage in Canada Not Enough to Live On, Report Finds
Implications
The cultural/social impacts of the issue, are stereotypes. It is a stereotype that you must be on drugs or on welfare to have a minimum wage job. There are so many reasons- immigration, disability, not being able to afford education, etc. People in society judge minimum wage workers but there is always a reason. The economic implications, are that the economy will not do any better because with minimum wage comes minimum effort. If you're paying someone minimum wage and someone else $20/hr, chances are the person making more will try a lot harder, and therefore make more money for their employer. The political impact, is that minimum wage is simply not enough to live on, and despite this, it is still the government's job to guarantee the welfare of their people. Therefore, the government is responsible for providing welfare for people who need it, for providing shelters, food banks, etc.
Canadian Issues
Article 8: Minimum Wage in Canada Not Enough to Live On, Report Finds
Bias
The bias in this article is that the author may base a lot of his information on personal experiences. He is an author from Ottawa, and this may affect the way in which the information is presented because minimum wage rates are also low there, and therefore may be talking from personal experience. He is also a freelance author, so this could contribute to the bias as well.
Articles
Article 1:
Levy, Pema. "The Supreme Court May Be about to Piss off Every Republican Running for President." Mother Jones. 12 June 2015. Web. 16 June 2015. <http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2015/06/supreme-court-abortion-texas-election>.

Article 2:
Shaha, Anup. "Action on Climate Change Is Cheaper than Inaction." Global Issues. 2 Feb. 2015. Web. 16 June 2015. <http://www.globalissues.org/article/806/action-cheaper-than-inaction>.

Article 3:
Kawczynski, Daniel. "New Statesman." Where next for Libya? 4 June 2015. Web. 16 June 2015. <http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/2015/06/where-next-libya>.

Article 4:
Aulakh, Raveena. "Climate Change Could Kill off 1 in 6 of Earth’s Species, Says Study | Toronto Star." Thestar.com. 1 May 2015. Web. 16 June 2015. <http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2015/05/01/climate-change-could-kill-off-1-in-6-of-earths-species-says-study.html>.

Article 5:

Dreger, Alice. "The Big Problem With Outlawing Gender Conversion Therapies." Wired.com. Conde Nast Digital, 4 June 2015. Web. 16 June 2015. <http://www.wired.com/2015/06/big-problem-outlawing-gender-conversion-therapies/>.

Article 6:
"Twelve Things Women in Saudi Arabia Can't Do." The Week UK. 10 June 2015. Web. 16 June 2015. <http://www.theweek.co.uk/60339/twelve-things-women-in-saudi-arabia-cant-do>.

Article 7:
Sampert, Shannon. "Aboriginal People May Lose Patience If Report Doesn't Stir Action." Winnipeg Free Press. 3 June 2015. Web. 16 June 2015. <http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/columnists/Aboriginals-may-lose-patience-if-report-doesnt-stir-action-306064261.html>.

Article 8:
Baker-Voakes, Kaven. "Minimum Wage in Canada Not Enough to Live On, Report Finds." The Epoch Times Minimum Wage in Canada Not Enough to Live On Report Finds Comments. 22 Apr. 2015. Web. 16 June 2015. <http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/1330984-minimum-wage-in-canada-not-enough-to-live-on-report-finds/>.











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