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Sonnet 57

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by

Carol Zhang

on 22 October 2012

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Transcript of Sonnet 57

"Being your slave, what should I do but tend
Upon the hours and times of your desire?
I have no precious time at all to spend,
Nor services to do, till you require." "Nor dare I question with my jealous thought
Where you may be, or your affairs suppose,
But, like a sad slave, stay and think of nought
Save, where you are how happy you make those." by William Shakespeare

Presented by Carol Zhang Sonnet 57 "Nor dare I chide the world-without-end hour
Whilst I, my sovereign, watch the clock for you,
Nor think the bitterness of absence sour
When you have bid your servant once adieu;" "So true a fool is love that in your will,
Though you do any thing, he thinks no ill." A
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G Rhyme Scheme: Shakespearean Being your slave, what should I do but tend Upon the hours and times of your desire? I have no precious time* at all to spend, Nor services to do, till you require. Nor dare I chide the world-without-end hourWhilst I, my sovereign, watch the clock for you,Nor think the bitterness of absence sour When you have bid your servant once adieu; Nor dare I question with my jealous thought Where you may be, or your affairs suppose, But, like a sad slave, stay and think of noughtSave, where you are how happy you make those.So true a fool is love that in your will,Though you do any thing, he thinks no ill. Rhetorical Question- The sonnet opens with a question that expresses the incredulity that the speaker could do anything that isn't for his love or has to do with his love to emphasize hs love and devotion.
Anaphora- Several lines begin with 'Nor" to emphasize the huge amount of restraint that the speaker employs for his love
Metaphor- compares himself to a 'sad slave", emphasizes his undying and selfless love for the lover as he waits for her to come back Devices Part of Fair Youth Sequence, which is directed to a young male
Heavy themes of unequal power in the sonnet
Draws a strong comparison with slavery in love
Catharsis- This is an example of a release of emotions through drama, from Aristotle's Poetics Background The Speaker is in love and emphasizes how he would do anything for his love. He draws a comparison of himself to a slave. He spends all his time doing things for his love or waiting to do stuff for his love The Speaker does not get angry or bitter while his love is absent and he is waiting for him to come back because he is like a loyal servant to him I don't think about where you are out of jealously but instead I only think about how happy you make those that you are around, wherever you are I will love you no matter what and never think bad about you Quatrains and couplet division- Clearly divide different topics that progress from his devotion in doing things for her, what he has to overcome for his love, to the blindness and permanence of his love
Volta- Slight change in topic after line 8 because the sonnet begins to talk about the actions of his lover, rather than what he does for his love. Continued
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