Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Should, shouldn't, ought to, must, mustn't, have to and don't have to

No description
by

Michael Brothwood

on 19 November 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Should, shouldn't, ought to, must, mustn't, have to and don't have to

Obligations and prohibitions
To express prohibition we use
mustn't:
Never use
mustn't
about the past. For prohibitions in the past we can use
not allowed to
:

We weren't
allowed to
speak.
I wasn't
allowed to
eat chocolate before dinner
No obligation
To say that there is not obligation, or that it is not necessary, we use
don't have to
or
needn't
.
To express obligation, we use
must
and
have to
:
Prohibition
Prohibition
Obligation
To give somebody advice we use
should
or, less often
ought to
:
We use
must
for strong advice:
Advice
You
should
get some new shoes
(I think it is a good idea for you to get some new shoes)
You
ought
to relax now
(I think it is a good idea that you should relax now)
Particularly in the negative,
shouldn't
is more common that
oughtn't
:
Normally
You
shouldn't
go outside today as it is raining.
The question form:

Should I/she/we etc ........
We often use
should
(and occasionally
ought to
) to talk about the right thing to do, but which is different from what actually happens:
I
should
do more homework instead of watching TV.
He
should
read more books instead of playing video games.
You
must
be quiet.
I
have to
go now.
We use must when the obligation is something we agree with (more personal):
We use have to when the obligation comes from somebody else: (external)
You must hand in your homework on Monday.
My teacher has given me a lot of homework which I have to do for Monday.
You
must
be careful if you go rock climbing.
The question forms are must I/you, etc and do I /you etc have to.
Must we stop writing now?Do they have to wear uniform at school?
You
mustn't
go in there
You
mustn't
speak during an exam
Do not use
have to
with prohibition (different definition: not necessary)
This is extra work, you
don't have to
do it.
You
needn't
learn all the vocabulary in this book.
Full transcript