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Rhetorical Analysis Gettysburg

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Eric Klingensmith

on 5 April 2013

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Transcript of Rhetorical Analysis Gettysburg

SOAPSTone Subject—Unification of the nation

Occasion—to dedication a burial site at the sight of the battle of Gettysburg

Audience—Family members of those who died at Gettysburg from both Confederacy and Union

Purpose –To persuade Confederates and Union to band together to unify the nation once again

Speaker—Lincoln who uses repetition, restatement, and parallelism to persuade his audience to unify

Tone—Author’s attitude toward audience is one of concern and he desires to create a unity to honor all of those who are dead to show that they did not die without cause—Author’s attitude toward subject is one of solemnity and gratitude to those fallen soldiers. SOAPSTone In Learning Teams in pairs select a facilitator and scribe to lead and record the elements of your Socratic discussion.

Discussion: Determine how each element below is used in the assigned reading. Answers should entail explanations and evidence from the text.

Subject
Occasion
Audience
Purpose
Speaker
Tone Objectives: 1. to identify author's subject, occasion, audience, purpose, speaker, and tone in a non-fiction work and evaluate the author's intent
2. to identify and analyze rhetorical devices in a non-fiction work to determine an author's intent
3. to utilize the writing process in creating an essay that analyzes the rhetoric used by an author Close Reading for Rhetoric The Gettysburg Address
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Close Reading forRhetoric Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. Close Reading for Rhetoric But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate -- we can not consecrate -- we can not hallow -- this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain -- that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom -- and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth. Mr. Klingensmith Rhetoric and The Gettysburg Address Composition Assignment Using MLA formatting, compose an essay that analyzes how Lincoln uses the rhetorical devices of repetition, restatement, and parallelism to achieve his purpose in the Gettysburg Address.
Create an outline using your notes from this lecture
Use in-text citations when quoting, paraphrasing, or summarizing from the original source
Create a Works Cited page for any sources beyond the text I provided for you
Scoring based on the AP scoring guide: 9=50/50, 8=47.5/50, 7=45/50, et cetera.
All submissions will be online via email, Turnitin.com or Google Drive
Rough draft due next class Timpson, Jake. "Remember the Titans Gettysburg." Online video clip. Youtube. Youtube, 21 June 2012. 2 Apr 2012. Read to identify Repetition, Restatement, and Parallelism
Explain WHY this specific rhetorical device is used and HOW it helps the author achieve his purpose
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