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Conjunctions Only

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by

Kate Loden

on 11 February 2016

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Transcript of Conjunctions Only

CON = together
CONJUNCTIONS
JUNCT = join
A
conjunction
JOINS two words or group of words TOGETHER.
We can remember the
Coordinating conjunctions
by thinking of:
Examples:
Watermelon
and
grapefruit are my favorite fruits.
Bill plans to sell his truck
and
to buy a hybrid.
CONJUNCTIONS
Coordinating
Subordinating
Correlative
Coordinating Conjunctions
connect any two units that are the same type.
Two nouns:

Jane

and

Mark
swam.
Two verbs:
We
laughed
or

sang
.
Two Adjectives:
He was
strong

and
fast
.
Two Adverbs:
She wrote
quickly

but

well
.
Two Pronouns:

She

and
I
took a walk.
Two Phrases:
She was
on the path

and

in the clear
.
Two Clauses:

People laughed
,
so
we laughed too
.
Coordination
combines
two clauses
into ONE sentence:
You called my sister
, and
I called your brother
.
I have to pay the bill
, or
they will shut off the lights
.
It wasn't dark
, but
the moon was visible.
Subordinating Conjunctions
connect sentences. However, the two parts that are connected are not of equal value in terms of the meaning of the whole sentence.
There is a
main sentence
with a
subpart
. This is the
Independent Clause
and the
Dependent Clause
.
Subordination holds two clauses together:
She continued arguing
until
everyone finally agreed with her.
They live down south
when

the weather gets cold.
When
the weather gets cold,
they live down south
.
Common Subordinating Conjunctions
after
although
as
as if
as though
because
before
even if
even though
how
if
in order that
once
rather than
since
so (that)
than
that
though
till
unless
until
what
when
whenever
where
wherever
whether
which
while
who
why
Correlative Conjunctions
join words, phrases, and sentences of equal importance. They appear in pairs, and both parts receive the same attention.

Common Correlative Conjunctions
both/and
either/or
whether/or
neither/nor
not only/but also

Examples:
Either
Bernice
or
Lauren determines the work schedule.
The speaker
not only
described the benefits of laughter
but also
related some personal stories to illustrate her point.

Thanks for watching!
Fanboys
Coordination and subordination give you options!
A deer dodged around my car. I almost hit him.
Coordination:
A deer dodged around my car
, so
I almost hit him.
A deer dodged around my car
, and
I almost hit him.
Subordination
When
a deer dodged around my car, I almost hit him.
A deer dodged around my car
after
I almost hit him.
Subordination and Coordination
through
A
clause
is another name for a short sentence -- a complete thought.
Only the
independent clause
can stand alone as a sentence:
She continued arguing.
They live down south.
The
dependent clauses
are
FRAGMENTS
if they are not attached to an independent clause:
Until everyone finally agreed with her.
When the weather gets cold.


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