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Warriors Don't Cry Collaboration Project

Carleigh's quotes are in black ink and her explanations are in pink. Susana's quotes are in mauve ink and her explanations are in dark brown.
by

Susana Pedraza

on 20 May 2013

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Transcript of Warriors Don't Cry Collaboration Project

“I was beginning to resign myself to the fact that white people were definitely in charge, and there was nothing we could do about it." This was a moment in the book when the main character faces a moment of defeat after his parents are forced to pay an overcharged grocery bill in the presence of a white cashier. "Marissa shouted to me to run faster. She let go of her bag and dragged me by my arm. If we didn't hurry, we'd get raped, she said over and over."
This is when Marissa, a huge girl who is believed to be “retarded” saves Melba from a terrifying situation with a white rapist. Marissa is firstly perceived as the neighborhood bully but is Melba’s savior in this situation. “The task that remains is to cope with our interdependence - to see ourselves reflected in every other human being and to respect and honor our differences.” “The effort to separate ourselves whether by race, creed, color, religion, or status is as costly to the separator as to those who would be separated.” Warriors
Don't
Cry Page 222 Page 10 “It felt as though we always had a white foot pressed against the back of our necks. I was feeling more and more vulnerable as I watched them continually struggle to solve the mystery of what white folks expected out of them.” This quote is said by Melba and she feels vulnerable as she watched them struggle to figure out what white people expected of them and how they don’t step out of place as if it were a sin. Page 7 Page 17 “You’ll make this your last cry. You’re a warrior on the battlefield for your Lord. God’s warriors don’t cry, ‘cause they trust he’s always by their side. The women of this family don’t break down in the face of trouble. We act with courage, and with God’s help, we ship trouble right on out.”

Page 44 This quote was said by Grandma India to Melba because Melba was crying after she was attacked by the mob outside Little Rock’s Central High School. Grandma India’s quote is bittersweet because Melba must break the color barrier at Little Rock’s Central High School. Page 109 “It’s hard being with little Rock white people. I don’t know if I can do this integration think forever. It feels like this is something people do for only a little while. I want to run away now. I want a happy day.” This quote was written in Melba’s diary and she writes that integration has put her under a large amount of stress. All the students are pro segregation so Melba is unsure if she will be able to be prejudice any more. She wants happy days but she knows she won’t get that from Central.

“Did you think we were gonna let niggers use our toilets? We’ll burn you alive, girl,” a voice shouted through the door. “There won’t be enough of you left to worry about.”

Page 119 This quote was said by a hostile group that was holding the door so Melba couldn’t get out. Melba was shouting out for help and the hostile group was holding the door so she couldn’t escape and that they were threatening her life.

This is Melba’s realization at the very ending of the novel. Melba realizes that segregation is equally detrimental to both sides. This quotes exemplifies the philosophical side of what Melba’s mother mentioned at her wedding. The freedom of African Americans was not just for African Americans but also is meant to be the inspiration of other people who are oppressed. This quote also aims to clarify that integration is not ignoring racial differences but instead embracing them and respecting our differences in a peaceful way.
Page 150 This is what a segregationist student of Central High reference to expulsion of Minnijean, a black girl who spilled chili on two white boys. Even though the boys were taunting Minnijean, she is the one who is suspended from schools. This quote exemplifies how the “white folk” wanted to get rid of the newly integrated students. "One nigger down, eight to go." “Change the rules of the game, girl, and they might not like it so much.” “They’d think I was crazy.” “They’d think you were no longer their victim.” Page 165 This quote was said by Grandma India to Melba because eggs were thrown at Melba by segregationist. Grandma India is advising Melba to fight back with love and kindness as a way to empower herself.
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