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Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM)

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gautham arkham

on 22 April 2015

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Transcript of Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM)

INTRODUCTION
LAUNCH AND AFTERWARDS
The Mars Orbiter Mission probe lifted-off from the First Launch Pad at Satish Dhawan Space Centre (Sriharikota Range SHAR), Andhra Pradesh, using a Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) rocket C25 at 09:08 UTC on 5 November 2013The launch window was approximately 20 days long and started on 28 October 2013.
The MOM probe spent about a month in Earth orbit, where it made a series of seven apogee-raising orbital manoeuvres before trans-Mars injection on 30 November 2013

The mission is a "technology demonstrator" project to develop the technologies for design, planning, management, and operations of an interplanetary mission.

The spacecraft is currently being monitored from the Spacecraft Control Centre at ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC) in Bangalore with support from Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN) antennae at Byalalu.




HISTORY
The MOM mission concept began with a feasibility study in 2010, after the launch of lunar satellite Chandrayaan-1 in 2008. The government of India approved the project on 3 August 2012,[28] after the Indian Space Research Organisation completed INR125 crore

The total project cost may be up to INR454 crore (US$71 million).The satellite costs INR153 crore (US$24 million) and the rest of the budget has been attributed to ground stations and relay upgrades that will be used for other ISRO projects.

The mounting of the five scientific instruments was completed at ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore, and the finished spacecraft was shipped to Sriharikota on 2 October 2013 for integration to the PSLV-XL launch vehicle.[33] The satellite's development was fast-tracked and completed in a record 15 months
Mission objectives
The primary objective of the Mars Orbiter Mission is to showcase India's rocket launch systems, spacecraft building and operations capabilities.
To develop the technologies required for design, planning, management and operations of an interplanetary mission
Meeting power, communications, thermal and payload operation requirements
The secondary objective is to explore Mars' surface features, morphology, mineralogy and Martian atmosphere using indigenous scientific instruments.
Study the dynamics of the upper atmosphere of Mars, effects of solar wind and radiation and the escape of volatiles to outer space

Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM)
The Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM), also called Mangalyaan is a spacecraft orbiting Mars since 24 September 2014. It was launched on 5 November 2013 by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO)
It is India's first interplanetary mission and ISRO has become the fourth space agency to reach Mars, after the Soviet space program, NASA, and the European Space Agency. It is the first Asian nation to reach Mars orbit, and the first nation in the world to do so in its first attempt.

The Mars Orbiter Mission probe lifted-off from the First Launch Pad at Satish Dhawan Space Centre (Sriharikota Range SHAR), Andhra Pradesh, using a Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) rocket C25 at 09:08 UTC (14:38 IST) on 5 November 2013
MILESTONES AND FUTURE AHEAD
On 28 September 2014, MOM controllers published the spacecraft's first global view of Mars. The image was captured by the Mars Colour Camera (MCC).
On 19 October 2014, the ISRO reported that MOM was healthy after the Comet Siding Spring flyby of Mars earlier that day.[91]
On 4 March 2015, the ISRO reported that MOM's methane sensors were functioning normally and are studying Mars' albedo, the reflectivity of the planet's surface. The Mars Colour Camera was also returning new images of the Martian surface.
ISRO plans to send a follow-up mission called Mangalyaan 2 with a greater scientific payload to Mars between 2018 and 2020.This mission will likely consist of a lander and rover, rather than being orbiter-only.


NASA AND ISRO TIE UP
Despite the US federal government shutdown, NASA reaffirmed on 5 October 2013 it would provide communications and navigation support to the mission.

During a meeting in 30 September 2014, NASA and ISRO officials signed an agreement to establish a pathway for future joint missions to explore Mars. One of the working group's objectives will be to explore potential coordinated observations and science analysis between MAVEN orbiter and MOM, as well as other current and future Mars missions.
BY
GAUTHAM
NOEL JOSEPH
Spacecraft specifications
Mass
: The lift-off mass was 1,350 kg (2,980 lb), including 852 kg (1,878 lb) of propellant.
Bus
: The spacecraft's bus is a modified I-1 K structure and propulsion hardware configuration, similar to Chandrayaan-1, India's lunar orbiter that operated from 2008 to 2009, with specific improvements and upgrades needed for a Mars mission. The satellite structure is constructed of an aluminium and composite fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) sandwich construction.

Power
: Electric power is generated by three solar array panels of 1.8 m × 1.4 m (5 ft 11 in × 4 ft 7 in) each (7.56 m2 (81.4 sq ft) total), for a maximum of 840 watts of power generation in Mars orbit. Electricity is stored in a 36 Ah Li-ion battery.
Propulsion
: A liquid fuel engine with a thrust of 440 newtons is used for orbit raising and insertion into Mars orbit. The orbiter also has eight 22-newton thrusters for attitude control.[44] Its propellant mass is 852 kg (1,878 lb).
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