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Case Study

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Dominique Bredeson

on 29 September 2013

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Transcript of Case Study

Worldview
"An often-overlooked source of difference in today's organizations involves age, and the experiences that accompany being part of that particular generation" (1, p. 14).
Boomers (born between 1946-64)
Xers (born between 1969-79)
Millennials (born between 1980-2002)
Dominique Bredeson, David Borchardt, & Justin Pilant
Case Study:
Personal Feelings
Our Case Study
References
Preview of Points
Meet your presenters...
-Dominique Bredeson-

City: Pismo Beach, CA

Plan: Become a Professor

Hobbies: Spending time at the beach, traveling, or with my family

-David Borchardt-

City: Fullerton

Plan: Consulting and Org Development work

Hobbies: Guitar, marksmanship training, traveling, swimming


-Justin Pilant-

City: Olympia, WA

Plan: Still deciding...

Hobbies: Cooking, gardening, wine tasting, and traveling to Boise State football games.


~Our case study

~Implications of case study

~Outside research and theories

~Strengths and weaknesses of case study

~How we personally feel about the case study

~Conclusions

~Review

~References

~Discussion Questions




Vibrant contrasts between each generation's worldview and characteristics are provided in the case study. The study provides compelling, supportive evidence and descriptions detailing the challenges each generation of workers and management encounters.

The case study provides little coverage of the positive attributes each generation sees in the other age group. Because of this lack of balance, the coverage is negatively biased and primes the reader to evaluate only the negative interchanges between generations. This is not an objective account of the research and only provides half of the information needed to develop a diversity training strategy to overcome or compensate for these challenges.
Case Study 1.2
pages 14-17

Implications of Case Study
Outside Research
Strengths and Weaknesses
Each generation has different values. Leaders and managers must recognize
generational differences
in order to understand/avoid organizational conflict.
In addition to recognizing these
differences
, it is also beneficial to understand the reasons behind them.
Although generational research is well supported, it may not provide
significant conclusions
for successfully dealing with conflict

as a result of generational gaps.
~Our case study

~Implications of case study

~Outside research and theories

~Strengths and weaknesses of case study

~How we personally feel about the case study

~Conclusions

~Review

~References

~Discussion Questions


Question for the class: How do you deal with generational differences in your workplace?
Question for the class: Do you think it is fair to treat different generations differently at work or do you feel all employees should be treated the same, no matter their age?
Conclusions - Slides 64 - 75
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Enter Text
Review of Points
Q1: What generation do you belong to? Do you fit the generalizations provided about this generation? (From Slide 33)

Q2: How do you deal with generational differences in your own work environment? (From Slide 41)

Q3: Do you think it is fair to treat different generations differently at work, or do do you feel each employee should be treated the same, no matter their age? (From Slide 57)

Q4: Much workforce research targets group differences implying that variation between groups is more significant than within group variation. Consider your own generation and describe some of the more significant work-value divergence you have experienced. Could any of these differences be more critical than those between generations? If not, why not? If so, what are these differences and why are they more significant?(From Slide 76)

Discussion Questions
"Can You Trust
Anyone
Under Thirty?"
Our Case Study - Slides 5-33
Conrad, C., & Pool, M. S. (2012). Strategic organizational
communication in a global economy. (7th ed.). West
Sussex, United Kingdom: Wiley-Blackwell.
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Social stability
Low divorce rates
Job security
Gender divided labor
Loyalty to organizations
One's perceived success tied to organizational rank
Raised in an
era with...
Raised in an era with...
Both parents working
Rising divorce rates
Increased technology
Increased time spent in daycare
Parents experiencing down sizing in their company
Raised in an
era with...
Distrust in organization
Trust given to small groups, particularly friends
Increased online relationships
Self-reliance
Increased social concern
Most populated generation in U.S. history
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"They expect corporate
dis
loyalty" (1, p.14)
Xers do
not
feel obligated to stay with one company
Independent
Entrepreneurial
Hardworking
Xers like to receive feedback, but not necessarily from a supervisor.
Loyal
High
Standards
Ethical
Self-reliant
Networked
Task Driven
Social work is a concern; grassroots movements are more intriguing than working with a large organization
Xers are slackers according to Baby Boomers
Xers crave performance based rewards
Not often seen favorably by Boomers and Xers
Ys feel society is unstable
AKA: Gen Y
Question for the class: What generation do you belong to? Do you fit the generalizations provided about this generation?
Implications of Case Study - Slides 34-41
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Differing interpretation of professional identity makes measurement equivalence problematic (8).
When managing a multigenerational workforce; trainings must be multifaceted and treatment of employees must vary because they are each motivated differently (9).
"Generationalist research has long been criticized for a tendency to overgeneralize. This is especially true of research on the "Millennials," because that generation is more racially and ethnically diverse than any other generation in US history..." (1, p. 17).
Differences between generations in perception of work ethic
Problematic divergence in terminology definitions between generations, (eg. work ethic, hard work, professional obstacles)
Xers' are more different from Boomers and Millennials than expected
Baby Boomers' training, treatment, motivation
Xers' training, treatment, motivation
Millennials' training, treatment, motivation
Outside Research - Slides 42-62
Cekada, T.L. (2012). Training a Multigenerational Workforce.
Professional Safety, 57(3), 40-44.

Merlac, J. P., Woehr, D. J., & Banister, C. (2010). Generational Differences
in Work Ethic: An Examination of Measurement Equivalence Across Three Cohorts. Journal of Business Psychology , 315-324.


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Books and manuals
Case studies
Lectures
Little to no technology
Workshops
When training Boomers use:
When training Xers use:
A casual, fun learning environment
Exploration
Hands-on activities
Role play
Q and A
When training Millenials use:
Communication devices
Electronics
Games
Graphics
Media
Technology
Boomers are motivated by:
Job titles
The hopes of retiring
Xers are motivated by:
Hopes of promotion (often times replacing a Boomer)
Security
Millennials are motivated by:
Having
a
job
Projects that can make a social difference
Receiving praise - particularly from their team members
To make
a Boomer thrive:
Avoid having them manage Millennials
Place them in a competitive environment
Show them you are loyal
Treat them with respect
To make
an Xer thrive:
Give them autonomy - they hate feeling like someone is watching over their shoulder
Give them constant feedback
Provide them with "team" opportunities
To make Millennials thrive:
Allow them to multitask
Give them attention
Place them in a work team
Provide them with ample technology - particularly for communicating
Set high expectations
Strengths
Weaknesses
Question for the class: What is the perceived value of each generation by the other age groups? Are there positive characteristics which organizational training programs can embrace in order to promote not only tolerance but acceptance and even appreciation?



World events, social norms and many other historically significant cultural artifacts heavily influence the development of a cohort’s general worldview.
Identity Formation
Differences in family structure and relationships between workers and their organizations promote differences in professional identity
formation.
Investing in your organization is rewarding.
It's your duty.
Loyalty leads to seniority and seniority is the measurement of advancement.
Putting in time is worth it.
Investing in themselves and their skills is more important then investing in the organization.
Feel advancement should be based on performance.
Organizations are not part of their social support system
World events, social norms, and many other historically significant cultural artifacts heavily influence the development of a generation's general worldview.
Boomers
Xers
Millenials

This article pays significant attention to the negative aspects of the interrelationships between the generations. The author paints the picture that management has their work cut out for them when it comes to getting the different generations to successfully work together.
While there are certainly conflicts stemming from differing world views I wonder what positive evaluations these generations make of each other. Positive evaluations may be the seed for new types of diversity training.
Positivity
Conclusions
They feel...
Both of these generations feel different then Boomers because they feel that:
They feel...
David
I see this article as a good primer in the generational differences research. It highlights conflict which is effective at attracting attention. I strongly feel it must also be balanced with exploration in the positive regard each generation have for each other. Building on both the positive and negative aspects of each groups' perspectives can offer opportunity to build a sustainable training system. Diversity appreciation, not just tolerance.
Dominique
I enjoyed the article. I felt it did a detailed job of bringing each generation to light. It caused me to be eager to do more reading on how to take the descriptions to the real world and learn how to work with differing generations.
Justin
I feel the best way to deal with generational differences is to view each person individually and have an open mind, knowing that each person has different values and motivations.
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Conrad, C., & Pool, M. S. (2012). Strategic organizational
communication in a global economy. (7th ed.). West
Sussex, United Kingdom: Wiley-Blackwell.
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Conrad, C., & Pool, M. S. (2012). Strategic organizational
communication in a global economy. (7th ed.). West
Sussex, United Kingdom: Wiley-Blackwell.
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Camire, C. (2011, October 19). [Web log message].
Retrieved from http://blogs.lowellsun.com/polsandpolitics/2011/10/19/baby-boomer-on-board/
Samnarine, N. (2013, June 28). [Web log message].
Retrieved from http://social.quintloyalty.com/
Kill, L. (n.d.). 3 ways to tailor your local media plan to speak
to millennials. Retrieved from http://www.localmediamethods.com/3-ways-tailor-local-media-plan-speak-millennials/
Hammer, M. (2013, September 27). Serving the next
generation workforce. Retrieved from http://www.evolllution.com/opinions/serving-the-next-generation-workforce/
Welch, A. (2010, February 18). [Web log message]. Retrieved
from http://www.andrewdwelch.com/2010/02/todays-millennials-lost-generation-or.html
LaManna, L. (2012, November 14). [Web log message].
Retrieved from http://blogs.sap.com/innovation/human-resources/an-inside-look-at-how-gen-y-gen-x-and-baby-boomers-view-the-workplace-020721
Conrad, C., & Pool, M. S. (2012). Strategic organizational
communication in a global economy. (7th ed.). West Sussex, United Kingdom: Wiley-Blackwell.
Kuechle, J. (2007, November 1). Generation boomerang. Portland State
University Magazine, Retrieved from http://www.pdx.edu/magazine/news/generation-boomerang
Question for the class: Much workforce research targets group difference implying that variation between groups is more significant than within group variation. Consider your own generation and describe some of the more significant work-value divergence you have experienced. Could any of these differences be more critical than those between generations? If not, why not? If so, what are these differences and why are they more significant?
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Full transcript