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21.2 The Triumph of a Crusade

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Daniel Garza

on 29 April 2013

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Transcript of 21.2 The Triumph of a Crusade

The Triumph of a Crusade Lecture 21.2 Riding For Freedom Jim Crow South The Civil Rights Movement March to Washington Fighting for Voting Rights THE END Standing Firm Civil rights activists break through racial barriers. Their activism prompts landmark legislation. Voting Rights Act of 1965
Congress finally passes Voting Rights Act of 1965
Stops literacy tests, allows federal officials to enroll voters
Increases black voter enrollment NEXT The Selma Campaign
1965, voting rights demonstrator killed in Selma, AL
King leads 600 protest marchers; TV shows police violently stop them
Second march, with federal protection, swells to 25,000 people A New Political Party
Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party formed to get seat in MS party
• Fannie Lou Hamer—voice of MFDP at National Convention—wins support
LBJ fears losing Southern white vote, pressures leaders to compromise
MFDP and SNCC supporters feel betrayed Freedom Summer
• Freedom Summer—CORE, SNCC project to register blacks to vote in MS
• Volunteers beaten, killed; businesses, homes, churches burned Kennedy Takes a Stand
June, JFK sends troops to force Gov. Wallace to desegregate U of AL
NAACP’s Medgar Evers murdered; hung juries lead to killer’s release NEXT Integrating Ole Miss
1962, federal court rules James Meredith may enroll at U of MS
Governor Ross Barnett refuses to let Meredith register
JFK orders federal marshals to escort Meredith to registrar’s office
Barnett makes radio appeal; thousands of white demonstrators riot
Federal officials accompany Meredith to classes, protect his parents New Volunteers
Bus companies refuse to continue carrying CORE freedom riders
SNCC volunteers replace CORE riders; are violently stopped
Robert Kennedy pressures bus company to continue transporting riders King followed his philosophy, even when a wave of racial violence occurred in the South after the Brown II decision that included the 1955 murder of Emmett Till, a 14 year old African-American boy who had flirted with a white women, and the shootings and beatings of civil rights workers. More Violence
September, 4 Birmingham girls killed when bomb thrown into church
LBJ signs Civil Rights Act of 1964
- prohibits discrimination because of race, religion, gender NEXT The Dream of Equality
August 1963, over 250,000 people converge on Washington
Speakers demand immediate passage of civil rights bill
King gives “I Have a Dream” speech Arrival of Federal Marshals
Alabama officials don’t give promised protection; mob attacks riders
Newspapers throughout nation denounce beatings
JFK sends 400 U.S. marshals to protect riders
Attorney general, Interstate Commerce Commission act:
- ban segregation in all interstate travel facilities CORE’s Freedom Rides
• 1961, CORE tests Court decision banning interstate bus segregation
• Freedom riders—blacks, whites sit, use station facilities together
• Riders brutally beaten by Alabama mobs; one bus firebombed NEXT Heading into Birmingham
April 1963, SCLC demonstrate to desegregate Birmingham
King arrested, writes “Letter from Birmingham Jail”
TV news show police attacking child marchers—fire hoses, dogs, clubs
Continued protests, economic boycott, bad press end segregation
Full transcript