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The Farewell Section 7

By: Allison Maier, Johanna Hoover, Jordan Freeman, Hannah Peterson
by

Hannah Peterson

on 7 September 2012

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Transcript of The Farewell Section 7

By: Allison Maier, Johanna Hoover,
Jordan Freeman, and Hannah Peterson The Farewell Section 7 Coerce, Congealing, Plausibly, Implicitly, Stigmatize, Quasi, Subsidize, Yeomanry Sentence that typifies the author's voice: "Hamilton's exquisite sense of affinity for Washington's mentality failed him only once, though the failure, and therefore what is in effect the missing section of the Farewell Address, opens a more expansive window into the national vision that Washington was trying to project." The author uses language and vocabulary such as this in most of the chapter. Interesting Adjectives: Candid - "But to be candid," - it is an interesting word that is very uncommon.

Quasi - "...new quasi nation..." - this is another uncommon word, and he is saying that the country merely resembles a nation. Surprising Verbs: Congealing - it's an uncommon word.

Stigmatized - the people were labeling George Washington. "He recommended that Congress take in a a new wave of federal initiatives..."
The use of "wave" would be a metaphor.

"Here was a characteristically Washingtonian insight - rooted in his experience during the war years..."
The use of "rooted" is the opposite of personification by comparing a person to a plant because plants can be physically "rooted."
Complex Sentence: The only realistic solution required the Indians to accept the inevitable abandon their hunter-gatherer economies, which required huge tracts of land to work effectively, embrace farming as their preferred mode of life, and gradually over several generations allow themselves to be assimilated into the larger American nation.

The author uses language very descriptively to get his point across clearly. Author's Craft and Shifts The author effectively uses shifts at the beginning and at the end of the section. In this section, he starts a new paragraph with a question and transitional words. An example of this is when the author writes, "Intriguingly, the two chieftains of the Republican opposition, Jefferson and Madison, had never served in the army. They obviously did not understand. [Shifts here] How could this emerging nation manage its way through this first post-Washington phase of its development?" Figurative Language Context Clues Words:
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