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Towards the Finite: A Case against Infinity in Jorge Luis Borges

The goal of this thesis is to acknowledge the problem of infinity in Borges’s work and then propose a way to escape it.
by

Esteban Santis

on 25 October 2013

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Transcript of Towards the Finite: A Case against Infinity in Jorge Luis Borges

Esteban Leonardo Santis
Thesis Chait: Dr. Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés
Department of English, College of Arts and Humanities
A NEW REFUTATION OF TIME
The goal of this thesis is to acknowledge the problem of infinity in Borges’s work and then propose a way to escape it.
How does he portray infinity?
Labyrinths
Mirrors
Libraries

Is there a way out?
A New Refutation of Time
"Time is the substance of which I am made. Time is a river that sweeps me along, but I am the river; it is a tiger which destroys me, but I am the tiger; it is a fire which consumes me, but I am the fire” (234).
(1947)
Salvador Dali, Galatea of the Spheres (1952)
Nathan George Horwitt, Wall Clock
“The next time I kill you,” Scharlach replied, “I promise you the labyrinth that consists of a single straight line that is invisible and endless.”He stepped back a few steps. Then, very carefully, he fired." -from "Death and the Compass"
M.C. Escher, Hand with Reflecting Globe (1935)
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