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Women's Lacrosse

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by

Rachel Woods

on 16 January 2014

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Transcript of Women's Lacrosse

Example of impulse momentum in lacrosse
Throwing a lacrosse ball
Background
Playing Defense
When a player is setting up to play defense, they square heir hips up and spread out their feet, so their mass is more distributed throughout their bodies.
The goal of playing defense is to stop the oncoming player, and to do this the defensive player has to provide a force for a given amount of time to slow down the momentum that the offensive player has.
When the defensive player collides with the offensive player, they are both running. To find out how much force is put on the defensive player, we can use the impulse and momentum equation.
Sources
1. Throwing the lacrosse ball





2. Playing defense
When a player throws a lacrosse ball, they put a certain amount of force on their stick so they are able to throw the ball.
This makes the ball move from a certain momentum to another momentum that is different because of the force acted on it from the throw.
We can find out the force that the player puts on the ball through the impulse equation.
How this relates to the impulse equation
How this relates to the impulse equation
Women's Lacrosse
Rachel Woods
C Block
The original game of women's lacrosse was introduced in 1890 at St. Leonard's School in Scotland.





It was introduced by Louisa Lumsden, and one of her students, Rosabelle Sinclair, then established the first women's lacrosse team in the US at the Bryn Mawr school in Baltimore, Maryland.
http://www.hautestick.com/LaxGear/OddBall/NCAA-Spec-Ball.html
http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/lacrosse-girl-player-ready-to-pass-19969960.jpg
http://www.franklin.ma.us/auto/upload/schools/fhs/456-shoot.jpg
http://www.trbimg.com/img-4fa1b8a4/turbine/chi-nus-thornton-american-lacrosse-conference--001/600
http://media3.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/photo/gallery/100528/GAL-10May28-4713/media/PHO-10May28-228051.jpg
http://filacrosse.com/origin/
If Rachel is playing defense on Shane, when they collide, what is the force exerted on Rachel?

The information
My mass- 59kg
My initial velocity- 3.4 m/s
My final velocity- ?
Shane's mass- 43g
Shane's initial velocity- 6.3 m/s
Shane's final velocity- 2.4 m/s
Time of collision- .7s
The equation
(Shane's mass*vi) + (My mass*vi) = (shane's mass*vf) + (my mass*vf)


(43*6.5m/s) + (59*3.4m/s) = (43*2.4m/s) + (59*vf)
(279.5) + (200.6) = (103.2) + (59vf)
480.1=103.2+59vf
480.1-103.2=59vf
376.9=59vf
376.9/59
vf=6.3 m/s
Force exerted on Rachel

To find out the force exerted on me, we plug the information we found from the first equation into the impulse equation.

F=m*(vf-vi)/time
F= 59*(6.3-3.4)/.7
F=59*(2.9)/.7
F= 244.428

The information
Mass of ball-140g
Initial Velocity- 0 (the ball starts in the stick not moving)
Distance- 11.52144 m
Final Velocity-6.77 m/s
Time of throw-.4s

The equation
F=m*(vf-vi)/t

F=(140)*(6.77-0)/.4
F=140*6.77/.4
F=947.8/.4
F=2369.5 N

The equation helps shows the
force that is acting on the ball,
and this force is 2369.5 N.
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