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SGO creation process and overview

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Ross Stanger

on 28 August 2013

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Transcript of SGO creation process and overview

SGOs
A Student Growth Objective (SGO) is a long-term academic goal that teachers set for groups of students and must be: Specific and measurable, aligned to New Jersey’s curriculum standards, based on available prior student learning data, and measure of what a student has learned between two points in time, and ambitious and achievable.
When done thoughtfully and collaboratively the SGO process will lead to the following:

 An increase in the quality of discussions surrounding student growth and learning

 An opportunity for teachers to engage in the evaluation and creation of assessments

 Increased knowledge and focused use of New Jersey’s curriculum standards

 Deeper understanding of the academic strengths and weaknesses of students

 Clearer indications of when and how to adjust instruction to meet students’ needs

 Increased opportunities to reflect on student performance and teaching practice

 More thoughtful professional planning for the next school year
A teacher develops SGOs in consultation with his or her principal, or the principal’s designee. The principal makes the final determination about the SGO.
Teachers who do not receive an SGP score must set 2 SGOs.
If you teach in a non-tested grade and subject - all teachers other than math and LAL teachers in 4th-8th grade - you must set 2 SGOs. At least one of these should be a General SGO. The following examples provide several approaches that can guide you and your evaluator in making the right choice for your situation.

In some cases, perhaps because you have multiple levels or types of classes, setting one General SGO for all students will be impractical. In this case, you will set two General SGOs, as in Example 2 that follows.
Required SGOs must be approved by the principal, or the principal’s designee, by November 15. Any changes to an SGO must be completed and approved by February 15. The teacher’s supervisor scores the SGO and the rating, if available, is discussed during the annual summary conference.
SGOs must be approved by the principal, or the principal’s designee, by November 15. Any changes to an SGO must be completed and approved by February 15. The teacher’s supervisor scores the SGO and the rating, if available, is discussed during the annual summary conference.
Before beginning:
Decide how much of the SGO process can be done collaboratively with your colleagues, e.g. developing department-wide assessment, setting similar SGOs and collecting evidence of student learning, etc.

Choose or develop a quality assessment aligned to NJCCCS or CCSS.

Determine what assessments you have in place for your students now. Determine if they are appropriate for the purposes of SGOs. Check them for rigor, depth of knowledge, and standards alignment.

Plan to improve them or create new ones if necessary.
Determine what sources of information you can use to judge your students’ starting points. Decide whether you need to use a pre-assessment. Decide whether grouping students by preparedness level is appropriate and useful.

Consult with your evaluator to determine what combination of general and specific SGOs are appropriate for your teaching assignment. Using data collected in Step 2, set measurable goals that are ambitious and achievable. Define attainment levels for your SGOs. Complete the appropriate version of the SGO form and have your evaluator approve it.
Suggested Timeline and Steps:
Time Window Component of SGO Process

April - October

Choose or develop assessments

September – October

Determine starting points

September –November

Set SGOs

November 15

(2013 only)

Deadline for having SGO approved by evaluator

October – May

Track goals and refine instruction

January – February

Mid-year check in with evaluator

May – June

Review results, evaluator scores SGO


 Develop assessments collaboratively.

 Align all assessments with NJCCCS or CCSS.

 Align all assessments with district, school and department goals.

 Make sure all the content in your SGO is covered in the assessment.

 Incorporate test items that vary in levels of difficulty.

 Include a sufficient number of test items to ensure rigor.

 Collaboratively determine possible modifications to meet the needs of students.

 Develop rubrics to assess essay responses.

 Make sure content- and skill-based rubrics are specific and address multiple levels of proficiency.
Guidelines for Creating Questions
SGO Step 1, Form 2: Choose or Develop Quality Assessments

Standards Alignment and Coverage Check

Grade Level/Subject: ___________________________________________

Teacher(s): ______________________________________________________________

Directions: After aligning assessment to New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards or the Common Core State Standards, use the chart below to list assessment questions with the corresponding standards to which they are aligned. Use extra sheets as needed. Teachers with common assessments need only complete one copy.

Standard Number Standard Description Question Numbers/Portfolio Components
Non-tested Grades and Subjects

A Specific SGO allows you to focus on a particular group of students identified as needing extra attention, or a specific skill or content area in which all students might benefit. If you teach a non-tested grade or subject, your Specific SGO may complement the General SGO. For instance, the following example involves the history teacher mentioned in Example 1.


In the next example, the US 1 history teacher focuses his Specific SGO on a skill rather than an area of content.

Rather than a focus on a particular content or skill, you may decide that a particular subpopulation of your students would benefit from a Specific SGO - your struggling readers or your English language learners, for example. In this case, you would use the same assessment as for your General SGO but set target scores based on where these students started at the beginning of the year.

Example 6: A 10th-grade social studies teacher finds through the pre-assessment that his students are particularly weak in their understanding of government. He sets a Specific SGO that deals with this particular content area.

Example 7: A 10th-grade social studies teacher finds on the free response portion of the pre-assessment, some students were unable to clearly use evidence to support their points of view. He sets a Specific SGO that deals with this particular skill. He consults the Common Core State Standards in social studies to assist in developing appropriate activities and assessment questions.
Forms
Assessment Rigor and
Depth of Knowledge Analysis Form
4 Levels of Rigor:

Recall (Level 1)
Concept (Level 2)
Strategic Thinking (Level 3)
Extended Thinking (Level 4)
Level 1: Level 1:
Recall: Requires simple recall of such information as a fact, definition, term, or simple procedure.
List, Tell, Define, Label, Identify, Name, State, Write, Locate, Find, Match, Measure, Repeat How many...? Label parts of the…. Which is true or false...?
Level 2: Concept
Involves some mental skills, concepts, or processing beyond a habitual response; students must make some decisions about how to approach a problem or activity.
Estimate, Compare, Organize, Interpret, Modify, Predict, Cause/Effect, Summarize, Graph, Classify
Identify patterns in... Use context clues to... Predict what will happen when... What differences exist between...? If x occurs, y will….
Level 3: Strategic Thinking
Requires reasoning, planning, using evidence, and thinking at a higher level.
Critique, Formulate, Hypothesize, Construct, Revise, Investigate, Differentiate, Compare Construct a defense of…. Can you illustrate the concept of…?
Apply the method used to determine...? Use evidence to support….
Level 4: Extended Thinking
Requires complex reasoning, planning, developing, and thinking, most likely over an extended time. Cognitive demands are high, and students are required to make connections both within and among subject domains.
Design, Connect, Synthesize, Apply, Critique, Analyze, Create, Prove, Support Design x in order to….. Develop a proposal to…. Create a model that…. Critique the notion that…
SGO Approval Checklist for Teachers and Principals
__________
New Jersey Department of Education 27

SGO Step 1, Form 3: Choose or Develop Quality Assessments

Assessment Rigor and Depth of Knowledge Analysis

Grade Level/Subject: ____________________________________________

Teacher(s): _______________________________________________________________

Directions: Use the chart below to categorize assessment questions. Rigor increases as you go down the chart. While not all questions need be categorized, there must be sufficient examples of the highest levels of rigor. Teachers with common assessments need only complete one copy.

Level Learner Action Key Actions Sample Question Stems Question Numbers/Portfolio Components

Level 1:

Recall

Requires simple recall of such information as a fact, definition, term, or simple procedure.

List, Tell, Define, Label, Identify, Name, State, Write, Locate, Find, Match, Measure, Repeat

How many...?

Label parts of the….

Which is true or false...?

Level 2:

Concept

Involves some mental skills, concepts, or processing beyond a habitual response; students must make some decisions about how to approach a problem or activity.

Estimate, Compare, Organize, Interpret, Modify, Predict, Cause/Effect, Summarize, Graph, Classify

Identify patterns in...

Use context clues to... Predict what will happen when...

What differences exist between...?

If x occurs, y will….

Level 3:

Strategic Thinking

Requires reasoning, planning, using evidence, and thinking at a higher level.

Critique, Formulate, Hypothesize, Construct, Revise, Investigate, Differentiate, Compare

Construct a defense of…. Can you illustrate the concept of…?

Apply the method used to determine...?

Use evidence to support….

Level 4:

Extended Thinking

Requires complex reasoning, planning, developing, and thinking, most likely over an extended time. Cognitive demands are high, and students are required to make connections both within and among subject domains.

Design, Connect, Synthesize, Apply, Critique, Analyze, Create, Prove, Support

Design x in order to…..

Develop a proposal to…. Create a model that….

Critique the notion that…

New Jersey Department of Education 28

SGO Step 1, Form 4: Choose or Develop Quality Assessments

Approval Checklist for School-based Assessments

Grade Level/Subject: ____________________________________________

Teacher(s): ____________________________________________________

Evaluator Name: ___________________ Criteria Considerations (Check all that apply)

Alignment and Stretch

 Items/tasks cover key subject/grade-level content standards.

 Where applicable, items/tasks cover knowledge and skills that will be of value beyond the year – either in the next level of the subject, in other academic disciplines, or in career/life.

 Where applicable, there are low- and high-end stretch items that cover pre-requisite objectives from prior years and objectives from the next year/course.

 Scoring system is weighted appropriately for question complexity.

_______________________________________________________________________

Evidence/Feedback:

Rigor and Complexity

 Overall, the items, tasks, rubrics are appropriately challenging for the grade-level/course (e.g. appropriate depth of knowledge and correct reading level).

 Many items/tasks require strategic and extended thinking.

 Multiple-choice questions are appropriately rigorous or complex (e.g. multistep, four or more choices).

 Key content standards are assessed at greater depths of understanding and/or complexity.

_________________________________________________________________

Evidence/Feedback:

Format Captures True Mastery

 Items/tasks are written clearly.

 The assessment/tasks are free from bias; no wording or knowledge that is accessible to only specific ethnicities, subcultures, or genders.

 Some standards are assessed across multiple items/tasks.

 Item types and length of the assessment are appropriate for the subject/grade level.

 Tasks and open-ended questions have rubrics that (1) articulate what students are expected to know and do and (2) differentiate between levels of knowledge/mastery.

_______________________________________________________________________

Evidence/Feedback:

I approve of this assessment/task and any accompanying rubrics without further change.

Please make changes suggested in feedback above and resubmit the assessment/tasks and rubrics.

Signature of evaluator: __________________ Date: _________

Signature of teacher(s): __________________ Date: __________
Example 2: Setting multiple SGOs for one class of students:

An 11th-grade life science teacher teaches three sections of biology and two of anatomy and physiology. She sets one General SGO for all of her biology students and one General SGO for all of her anatomy and physiology students.
Example 3: A music teacher teaches two sections of orchestra, two sections of guitar, and one of strings. He sets one General SGO for orchestra, and one General SGO for guitar, thereby including the majority of his students.

Example 4: A kindergarten teacher has 14 students and uses a locally-developed portfolio to assess her students. She sets a General SGO for all of her students based on their growth as measured by the portfolio.
Timeline for implementation of SGOs
In preparing for the 2013-14 school year:
1) April-October- Develop assessments
2) September-October- develop starting points
3) September-November Set SGOs
4)
November 15: Deadline for SGOs to be approved
5) October-May- Track goals and refine instruction
6) January-February- Mid-year check-in with evaluator
7) May-June- Review results; evaluator scores SGOs
Process for Creating SGOs
Assessment Options
Traditional: AP Tests, EOC biology, District/State/Department tests
Portfolio Assessments:
Lab Notebooks, Performing Arts portfolios
Project-based assessments
Performance Assessment: Lab Practicum (Sciences)
Sight Reading (Music)
Dramatic Performance: (Drama)
Skills demo (Phys Ed)
Role Plays/TPRs (World Language/ESL
Possible Sources of Data for Students' Starting Points
Beginning of Course or Unit Tests
Preassessment
Prior Year Tests
Example: NJASK, DRA
Types of SGOs
Simple: You must predict what percentage of students will achieve a particular score
Tiered: Based on a prediction of growth over time based on a starting point
What We Want SGOs to Accomplish
Guidelines for Creating the SGO Assessments
There are two basic types of SGOs

(
simple and tiered)
and a variety of ways to create them.
Forms on the DOE website will assist you or serve as a checklist or guidelines
Form 1: Pre-Approval for School-Based Assessment
Form 2: Standards and Alignment Coverage Check
Form 3: Rigor and Depth of Analysis Check
Checklist For Evaluators
Approval Checklist
Identify and Approve Starting Points
SGO Form (Simple) & SGO Form (Tiered)
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