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A Look at Progressive Education

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alyssia belk

on 17 April 2014

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Transcript of A Look at Progressive Education

John Locke
August 29,1632-October 28, 1704
Is a pedagogical movement.
Began in the late nineteenth century.
Has various forms.
Background
A Look at Progressive Education
Alyssia Belk, Ciera Jamison, and Tierra Parks
William H. Kilpatrick
November 20, 1871- February 13, 1965
Teaching Strategies
Attending to the whole child: teaching children to be good individuals
Collaboration: “working with” instead of “doing to” model. Collaborative problem solving and focus on motives, values, and reasons
Social justice: put into action how to improve the lives of others
Deep understanding: activities and lessons are organized around problems, projects, and questions not facts, skills, and disciplines
Active learning: students help design the curriculum, generate the questions, seek the answers, use critical thinking, and evaluate how successful the teachers and students are
Provide experiences designed to integrate different subject areas to assist in expanding and exploring the world
Asking questions based on observations. Doesn’t want to challenge them but propose students to think deeply about issues and help them understand ideas from the inside out

Direct instruction: projects, group work, student’s explanation on how they solved a problem

Community based learning projects, real life scenarios, and case studies
Ways to Assess
1. Written Examinations
2. Practical Examinations
3. Concepts Maps
4. Peer Asessments
5. Self Assesments
6. Facilitators/ Tutor Assesments
7. Oral Presentation
8. Reports
9. Students Portfolios


Misconceptions and Criticism
Class Activity
Since progressive education is about emphasis on learning by doing, hands on activities and thematic units, today for our in-class activity we will explore progressive education through a thematic hands on activity with "Balls."

Explain activities
Divide into four groups
5-7 minutes to work within group
Each group will
explain how students can learn from a hands on activity similar to the one they are presenting
discuss what method you would use to assess students based on the activity your group had

Orgins
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
June 28, 1712-July 2, 1778
Classroom
Materials:
Books
Blocks
Yarn
Clay
Sand
Paint
Money/currency
Puppets
Garden tools
Puzzles
Technology
Layout:
Class size should be small
Big room
Good lighting
Windows
Easy access to outdoors
Tables preferred
Reading corner
Areas



Progressive Classroom Examples
Friedrich Frobel
April 21, 1782- June 21, 1852
Johann Herbart
May 4, 1776-August 14, 1841
John Dewey
November 20, 1859-June 1, 1952
Five Theoretical Standpoints
What Education is
What the school is
The Subject-Matter of Education
The Nature of Method
The School and Social Progress
Francis Parker
October 9, 1837- March 2 1902
Lesson Ideas
Math- Pizza Fractions

Language Arts- Sight Word Twister

Social Studies- History Scavenger Hunt

Science- Edible Solar System

Recording and Documenting Progress
Sources
Evers, W. (1998). How Progressive Education Gets It Wrong. Hoover Digest, 4. Retrieved from http://www.hoover.org/publications/hoover-digest/article/6408

Historical Foundations of Early Childhood Education. (n.d.) Progressive Education. Retrieved from http://earlychildhoodhistory.weebly.com/progressive-education.html

iEARN: Assess. http://us.iearn.org/professional_development/multimedia/assess/index.html

Kohn, A. (2008). Progressive Education. Why It’s Hard to Beat, But Also Hard to Find. Independent
School. Retrieved from http://www.alfiekohn.org/teaching/progressive.htm

Misconceptions about Progressive Education. Video. youtube.com/watch?v=bRPjV5Z3zEs

The Park School. (n.d.). Principles of Progressive Education. Retrieved from http://www.parkschool.net/about/philosophy/principles-of-progressive-education/
Full transcript