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Children's Literature Studies ESH151 Rhianna Gordon 184184

Welcome to my Prezi presentation on the Language, Visual and Critical Literacy features of three texts and their applications within a classroom.
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Rhianna Gordon

on 19 October 2013

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Transcript of Children's Literature Studies ESH151 Rhianna Gordon 184184

Children's Literature
Studies
ESH151
Picture Sources
http://www.booktopia.com.au/the-very-cranky-bear-collection-nick-bland/prod9781742833668.html
http://www.penguin.com.au/products/9780143503071/pearl-barley-charlie-parsley
http://quirkytales-oldandnew.blogspot.com.au/2010/02/fox-by-margaret-wild-illustrated-by-ron.html
Sources
Language Features
Module
Module
Module
The Very Cranky Bear
Pearl Barley and Charlie Parsley
Fox
Rhianna Gordon
184184

Rhyme
Alternates between rhyming couplets (AA,BB) and simple 4-line rhyme (ABCB).
No rhyme scheme.



Occasional internal rhyme.



'None of them had noticed that someone else was there,
Sleeping in the cave was a very cranky BEAR!'
(p.4)

'So Zebra fetched a tin of mud
and lion, some grass of gold.
Moose got two big branches,
and Sheep...well, Sheep got cold'
(p.11)
'Fly, Dog, fly! I will be your missing eye'
(p.6)
Alliteration
'In the Jingle, Jangle, Jungle'
(p.1)
'Four little friends found'
(p.1)
'Perfect place to play'
(p.1)
'Moose had marvelous'
(p.1)
'stripes and Sheep, ...well, Sheep'
(p.1)
Frequent alliteration.

'When saplings are springing'
(p.8)
Occasional alliteration.

'safe and sound'
(p.9)
(idiom)
'holds her hands'
(p.15)

Occasional alliteration,
includes an idiom.
Personification
All characters are
personified.
''Wait a minute' said Zebra'
(p.7)
''Stripes are silly' Moose complained'
(p.8)
''No,no,no,no,no' said Lion'
(p.10)
''Well thank you very much' said Bear'
(p.21)
No personification.

All characters are
personified.
"I know' said Dog'
(p.1)
''An eye is nothing' says Magpie'
(p.1)
'Fox says no more'
(p.15)
Simile and
Metaphor
'a scruff of feathers adrift in heat'
(p.24)
'shakes Magpie off his back as he would a flea'
(p.21)
'the air is creamy'
(p.11)
'He flickers through the trees like a tongue of fire'
(p.8)
'he runs so swiftly, it is almost as if he were flying'
(p.5)
Both similes and metaphors
are used.

'warm as toast'
(p.15)
'dances up a storm'
(p.22)
Includes both a metaphor and simile; both are idioms.

'grass of gold'
(p.11)
One metaphor.


Visual Features
The Very Cranky Bear
Pearl Barley and Charlie Parsley
Fox
Body Language
and expression
Anger and fear contrasts with comfort on the last page.


Bear: Hands on hips, furrowed brow and imposing stance
(p.16)
. Pointing and stalking, driving the animals away
(p.6)
. Last page Bear is asleep, smile on his face, endearing, soft and comfortable pose
(p.21)
.
Animals: Running, looking behind them with afraid faces
(p.5)
. Sheep is cowering, moulding body away from Bear
(p.18)
. Last page, animals playing cards
(p.21)
.
Affectionate body language. Intensity of facial expressions contrast to show personality differences.
Pearl and Charlie hold hands often
(p.1, p.15, p.19, p.23)
. Pearl's smile is wide and exaggerated to show her energetic personality
(p.4)
. Charlie's face is timid and soft to show his introversion
(p.5)
.
Body language focuses on body direction and shape to convey meaning.


Fox and Dog are juxtaposed, facing opposite direction in identical images to show their opposing personalities
(p.13 and p.14)
. Fox is often elongated and bending to show his untrustworthy nature
(p.8, p.16, p.21)
.
(Bland, 2008)
(Blabey, 2007)
(Wild, 2000)
(Bland, 2008)
(Blabey, 2007)
(Wild, 2000)
(Bland, 2008)
(Blabey, 2007)
(Wild, 2000)
(Bland, 2008)
(Blabey, 2007)
(Wild, 2000)
(Bland, 2008)
(Blabey, 2007)
(Wild, 2000)
Colour and Tone

Darkness symbolises Bear's anger and loneliness. Blue symbolises peace when conflict is resolved.
Bear stalks out from the darkness of his lonely cave
(p.6)
, while the animals who are happy and together are shown in the light
(p.15)
.
On the last page when the conflict is resolved,
Bear sleeps on a blue pillow to symbolise that he has found peace, while the animals play with blue cards which symbolise that they too are now content
(p.21)
.
Clothing colours are used to
represent personality differences. Bright red symbolises love. Grey images symbolise things that are bad or scary.
Charlie wears blue clothes which show that he is calm and passive
(p.1)
. Pearl wears red, and has vibrant, flame hair both of which show passion and impulsiveness
(p.1)
. Charlie's book is red, Pearl's torch is red, hoola hoops, goggles and wool are red; red symbolises the things Charlie and Peal love
(p.5, p.8, p.10, p.13, p.25)
. When Pearl is cold, she is grey; this shows that Pearl does not like being cold
(p.14)
. When charlie is scared he is grey; this shows that Charlie does not like to be scared
(p.16)
.
(Bland, 2008)
(Blabey, 2007)
Red/Orange symbolises danger. Blue tints symbolise
safety and contentedness.
(Wild, 2000)
The red Fox contrasts next to the the blue tinted page of Dog and Magpie running
(p.7 and p.8)
; red is symbolising the danger Fox represents to their friendship. The night is also tinted Red
(p.12)
, representing Magpie's fear and foreboding Fox's manipulation. Fox and Magpie running is both Red and Blue as it is dangerous, but Magpie is content
(p.18)
. Magpie hops away from the danger of the red sun
(p.27)
. Magpie's thought of Dog is tinted Blue; therefore Dog is where Magpie will be safe
(p.26)
.
Critical
Literacy
Features

Fox
Pearl Barley and Charlie Parsley
The Very Cranky Bear
Gender Stereotypes
Perpetuates stereotype that males are stronger than females.
Bear is a male; 'He gnashed his teeth'
(p.6)
. Lion is also a male; ''A golden mane like mine,' he said'
(p.10)
. Bears and Lions are both powerful and strong predatory animals. Sheep is female; 'So she fetched a pair of clippers'
(p.19)
. Zebra is also female; 'said Zebra as she scratched her furry chin'
(p.7)
. Sheep and Zebras are both prey and are much weaker than Lions and Bears. This perpetuates the outdated and sexist stereotype that females are the weaker gender.
Challenges stereotypical gender roles of boys and girls.
It is stereotypical that boys are 'loud' and 'run amok'
yet these are the traits of Pearl Barley
(p.4 and p.10)
. It is stereotypical that girls are 'quiet' and 'shy' yet these are the traits of Charlie Parsley
(p.5 and p.7)
. This shows that girls and boys do not have to accept traditional gender roles, as both characters are content with themselves.
(Blabey, 2007)
Somewhat perpetuates the stereotype that females need males to rescue and care for them.
Dog is male; 'his big, gentle mouth'
(p.1)
. Magpie is female; 'her burnt wing'
(p.1)
. Although Magpie is reluctant to accept his help, 'Magpie does not want his help'
(p.1)
, Dog does rescue Magpie, 'Sighing, Magpie does as he asks'
(p.3)
. In the end, Magpie heads back to the safety of Dog, but she is independent in her decision to go with Fox, and to trek home alone. Magpie is an empowered character, but a character that decides she still needs a Male for safety.
(Wild, 2001)
Values
Values friendship and individuality.

(Bland, 2008)
Values friendship and individuality.

(Blabey, 2007)
Values friendship.


(Wild, 2000)
Bear ultimately finds happiness with his new friends, demonstrated by his blue pillow
(p.21)
. However, he does not sacrifice his individuality, remaining cranky even when 'he's got antlers, stripes and mane'
(p.16)
. This shows that friends are important, but not if you have to change to get them.
Pearl and Charlie are 'really great friends' and this is shown to make them smile and feel happy
(p.1)
. However, they are individuals who are 'different in almost every way'
(p.3)
. Despite this, Pearl and Charlie experience a wonderful friendship, while keeping their individual personalities and interests. In fact their differences are 'why Pearl Barley and Charlie Parsley are friends'
(p.26)
. This shows that friendship and individuality are valued by the author.
Instead of individuality, friendship between Dog and Magpie thrives on overcoming individual deficits. Dog and Magpie become one, as 'a strange new creature'
(p.4)
. Their friendship makes them strong, Magpie being dogs 'missing eye' and Dog being her wings
(p.6)
. Their friendship also gives Magpie the strength to begin 'the long journey home'
(p.27)
. This shows that the author values friendship as something that makes people stronger.
(Bland, 2008)
Learning
Strategies

Using Fox to explore Visual Features
Using Pearl Barley and Charlie Parsley to explore Critical Literacy
Using The Very Cranky Bear to explore Language Features
Pearl Barley and Charlie Parsley
Fox
The Very Cranky Bear
Teaching students about colour symbolism with Fox.
Teaching students about gender stereotypes with Pearl Barley and Charlie Parsley.
Practicing consonant sounds with alliteration in The Very Cranky Bear.
Setting
: Year 1 Classroom
Content Descriptor
: ACELT1585 'Listen to, recite and perform poems, chants, rhymes and songs, imitating and inventing sound patterns including alliteration and rhyme' (ACARA, 2013a).
Learning Intention
: To be able to recite alliterative sequences and begin to give them meaning.
After the teacher reads The Very Cranky Bear aloud, 'Jingle Jangle Jungle' is written on the board. Students read along with the teacher, practicing their annunciation of consonant sounds. The teacher writes up other made up examples of alliterative triplets such as a 'Dainty Dotty Dancer' and a 'Creaky Clunky Car'. Students in small groups, after a short practice, recite one of the triplets to the class while acting out how the words make them feel; ie. tip toeing as a dainty dancer.
Using semantic cue system to associate feelings and actions with a word.
Using phonological-graphological cue system to concrete relationship between consonant sounds and letters.
Code-Breaking Practice
Text Participant Practice
...Some Definitions First
Code Breaking Practices - part of the Luke and Freebody Four Resource Model, code breaking is students decoding the symbols and conventions of writing in order to read text (Winch et. al., 2010, p.38)
Text Participant Practices - another part of the Luke and Freebody Four Resources Model, participating in the text involves understanding a text by students using their own knowledge and familiarity with words and practices (Winch et. al., 2010, p.39)
Phonological-Graphological Cue System - the system of visual and aural relationships in text, including letters, sounds, punctuation, direction and conventions (Winch et. al., 2010, p.35).
Semantic Cue System - the system of monitoring students use when understanding meaning in a text. Involves students relating text to their prior knowledge and experiences to make meaning. (Winch et. al., 2010, p.32).
Setting
: Year 5 classroom
Content Descriptor
: ACELT1608 'Identify aspects of literary texts that convey details or information about particular social, cultural and historical contexts' (ACARA, 2013b).
Learning Intention
: To be able to identify ways that Pearl and Charlie swap gender steretypes and why.
Setting
: Year 6 Classroom
Content Descriptor
: ACELT1617 'Identify the relationship between words, sounds, imagery and language patterns in narratives and poetry such as ballads, limericks and free verse' (ACARA, 2013c)
Learning Intention
: To be able to identify the relationship between colour and the narrative in Fox.
The teacher reads Pearl Barley and Charlie Parsley, but swaps the names so that Charlie is loud and extroverted while Pearl is quiet and introverted. Students are prompted with the question 'How are Pearl and Charlie normal?' After students answer and debate if necessary, the teacher re-reads the story, this time with the correct names, showing students the pictures. Students, after some discussion if necessary, must write down 10 ways the characters challenge societies ideas about boys and girls and why its important.
Text Analyst Practice
Using visual pictorial cue system as many of the challenging ideas are presented in the illustrations.
Text Analyst Practices - part of the Luke and Freebody Four Resources Model. The 'ways readers critique the underlying and unstated assumptions in a text and the way a text attempts to position them as readers' (Winch et. al., 2010, p.40).
Visual Pictorial Cue System - the system of visual elements which contribute to meaning in a text by repeating or adding to information (Winch et. al., 2010, p.36).
Students are given a handout with a table on it. The table has rows stating key moments in the story Fox. The next column gives the option to circle red or blue in each row and then in the last column comment on whether the resulting plot outcome was positive or negative. As the teacher reads Fox, students circle whether the illustration for each key moment has blue or red elements. The students later fill out whether that moment had a positive or negative impact on Magpie and Dog. Students will see a correlation between blue hued moments being positive and red moments being negative.
Fox arrives
Blue/Red
Negative, Fox is bad and takes Magpie away.
Example
Text Analyst Practice
Using visual pictorial cue system to interprete colours of illustrations.
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