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Title IX: Know Your Rights

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DCE

on 4 July 2016

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Transcript of Title IX: Know Your Rights

PLATFORMS
Social
SOCIAL
What is a cover letter?
A cover letter is a 1-page letter that you submit with your resume when you apply for a job.

Keywords from the job description include:
- Creative and innovative
- Problem solvers
- Team players with strong
interpersonal skills
- Committment to customer
loyalty
- Detail-oriented
Can you find any of these words in Ira's cover letter?
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What is Title IX?

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any educational program or activity that receives federal funding. Sexual and gender-based harassment, including sexual violence, are forms of sex discrimination in that they deny or limit an individual's ability to participate in or benefit from University activities.
Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment Policy at Harvard

“It is the policy of the University to provide educational, preventative and training programs regarding sexual or gender-based harassment; to encourage reporting of incidents; to prevent incidents of sexual and gender-based harassment from denying or limiting an individual’s ability to participate in or benefit from the University’s programs; to make available timely services for those who have been affected by discrimination; and to provide prompt and equitable methods of investigation and resolution to stop discrimination, remedy any harm, and prevent its recurrence. Violations of this Policy may result in the imposition of sanctions up to, and including, termination, dismissal, or expulsion, as determined by the appropriate officials at the School or unit."

To read the entire policy, please visit: diversity.harvard.edu/pages/title-ix-sexual-harassment.
Title IX Coordinators for the Division of Continuing Education (DCE)

Who they are:

Complaints Against Students

Robert Neugeboren, Dean of Student and Alumni Affairs
neugebor@fas.harvard.edu
(617) 495-1765
51 Brattle Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Complaints Against Staff

Anna Anctil, Sr. HR Consultant
anctil@fas.harvard.edu
(617) 496-2379
1414 Mass Ave., University Hall, 5th Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138

Sandy Stergiou, Sr. HR Consultant
stergiou@fas.harvard.edu
(617) 496-4039
1414 Mass Ave., University Hall, 5th Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138

Complaints Against Faculty

Mary Higgins, Associate Dean for Academic Administration
mary_higgins@harvard.edu
(617) 495-4867
51 Brattle Street, Room E-505, Cambridge, MA 02138
What they do:

Discuss your options, interim measures and supports, and how to file a formal complaint or obtain an informal resolution
Provide contact information of all available resources, both on and off campus
Requests for sexual favors in exchange for actual or promised academic and/or job benefits, such as grades, recommendations, favorable reviews, salary increases, promotions, etc.
Sharing visual or auditory records of sexual activity or nudity without the knowledge and consent of all recorded parties and recipient(s).
Commenting about or inappropriately touching an individual's body.
Lewd or sexually suggestive comments, jokes, innuendos, or gestures.
Observing, photographing, videotaping, or making other visual or auditory records of sexual activity or nudity, where there is a reasonable expectation of privacy, without the knowledge and consent of all parties.
Below are a few examples of conduct that may violate this policy:
How is "unwelcome conduct" defined?

Conduct is unwelcome if a person (1) did not request or invite it; and (2) regarded the unrequested or uninvited conduct as undesirable or offensive. That a person welcomes some sexual contact does not necessarily mean that person welcomes other sexual contact. Similarly, that a person willingly participates in conduct on one occasion does not necessarily mean that the same conduct is welcome on a subsequent occasion.
Students with questions or concerns about sexual harassment, sexual assault, or other unwelcome conduct based on gender should consider talking to a DCE Title IX Coordinator, the Title IX Officer, or the Office of Sexual and Gender-based Dispute Resolution (the ODR):

Robert Neugeboren
Dean of Students and Alumni Affairs
neugeboren@dcemail.harvard.edu, 617-496-8641

Harvard University Title IX Officer:
Mia Karvonides
mia_karvonides@harvard.edu, 617-495-4134

The Office for Sexual and Gender-Based Dispute Resolution (the ODR)
617-495-3786, ODR@harvard.edu
Filing a Complaint

DCE encourages all students to report incidents of sexual and gender-based harassment and violence. Although there is no time limit for reporting, DCE suggests prompt reporting for the most complete and effective investigation.

People who wish to report an incident of sexual harassment have several options.

You can report it to the University, by notifying a Title IX Coordinator or the
Office for Sexual and Gender-Based Dispute Resolution (ODR)
.
If you have experienced sexual violence or other sexual harassment that you believe may rise to the level of a violation of criminal law, you may make a report to HUPD. All HUPD officers, male and female, are qualified to handle crimes of a sensitive nature.
You may also report to an incident to both the University and the police.
Filing a Complaint

There are 3 types of complaints a person can file:

Informal
Formal
Criminal (with HUPD)

HES encourages all students to report incidents of sexual and gender-based harassment and violence. Although there is no time limit for reporting, HES suggests prompt reporting for the most complete and effective investigation.



Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) and College Campuses

Recent changes to the Clery Act, prompted by the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) in 2012, have strengthened University’s obligations to effectively respond to sexual harassment, including sexual violence. Such changes include the obligation to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking, and having certain provisions in the University’s sexual harassment policies and procedures.
Our Collective Responsibility

In order to end sexual violence and harassment, we must take responsibility for our actions in relationships, as bystanders, and as ethical leaders. We hope you use this knowledge both here at Harvard Extension School and in your future communities as leaders prepared to intervene and limit the occurrence of sexual violence and harassment.

Thank you for viewing the "Title IX: Know Your Rights" presentation.
Filing a Complaint

Designated Title IX Coordinators can talk to you about the University’s responsibility to respond and protect its students from sexual harassment, including sexual violence; can explain and, as appropriate, offer interim measures; answer questions about the complaint process; address concerns about potential retaliation; and when appropriate, offer an informal resolution. You may also contact the
Office for Sexual Gender-Based Dispute Resolution (ODR)
. When you contact ODR, you may: request information or advice, including whether certain conduct may violate the Policy; seek informal resolution; or file a formal complaint. Copies of the procedures for making a complaint are available at http://diversity.harvard.edu/pages/title-ix-sexual-harassment.
What constitutes sexual harassment under Harvard's Policy?

Sexual harassment is unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature when:

Submission to or rejection of such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a condition of an individual’s employment or academic standing or is used as the basis for employment decisions or for academic evaluation, grades, or advancement (quid pro quo harassment);

or:

Such conduct is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive that it interferes with or limits a person’s ability to participate in or benefit from the University’s education or work programs or activities (hostile environment harassment).


Sexual violence, including rape, sexual assault, and domestic and dating violence, is a form of sexual harassment.
Things You Can Do to Prevent Sexual Violence
and Become an Engaged Bystander

Notice the event and pay attention to whether the potential for harm is present and if intervention is immediately warranted.
Assess the potential for danger if you intervene; if intervention is unsafe, get help.
If safe, talk to the person(s) you are concerned about; tell them you are willing to help.
If safe, get the person(s) away from the situation — interrupt, distract, or remove the person(s).
Involve other bystanders, if appropriate.
Talk to a professional for follow-up advice.
Confidential Resources at DCE and Harvard

The Office of Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (OSAPR)
provides confidential, 24-hour information, assistance, and support for those who have experienced sexual assault and related forms of interpersonal violence, including sexual harassment and relationship abuse. You can contact the 24-hour response line at (617) 495-9100.

Harvard University Police Department
can assist you in reporting an incident involving sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. They can also arrange for an officer to transport you to Harvard University Health Services (HUHS), whether or not you decide to file a police report. You can contact HUPD at (617) 495-1212 or (617) 432-1212 (Longwood).

Counseling and Mental Health Services
can provide counseling services and referrals. You can contact this office at (617) 495-2042.

Harvard Chaplains
can provide religious counseling for a variety of faiths. You can contact this office at (617) 495-5529.
Community Resources

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center’s Rape Crisis Intervention Center
Provides 24-hour medical care as well as counseling and therapy services
(617) 667-8141

Boston Area Rape Crisis Center (BARCC)
Provides counseling, legal and medical advocacy, and case management for issues such as housing, employment and finances
(617) 492-8306
24 –hour hotline 1-800-841-8371

Cambridge Police Department Sexual Assault Unit
Provides a variety of police and social services
(617) 349-9342

Middlesex District Attorney Victim/Witness Bureau
Provides Victim Witness Advocates to assist navigating the legal system and referrals for community resources such as shelter and counseling
(781) 897-8490

Victim Rights Law Center
Provides free legal services throughout Massachusetts
(617) 399-6720

Transition House
Provides information and assistance about relationship violence and emergency, transitional and supported housing for women and children
24-hour hotline (617) 661-7203
Filing a Complaint

Designated Title IX Coordinators can assist you in a number of ways, which may include: talking to you about the University’s responsibility to respond and protect its students from sexual harassment, including sexual violence; explaining and, as appropriate, offering interim measures; answering questions about the complaint process; addressing concerns about potential retaliation; and when appropriate, offering an informal resolution. You may also contact the
Office for Sexual Gender-Based Dispute Resolution (ODR)
. When you contact ODR, you may: request information or advice, including whether certain conduct may violate the Policy; seek informal resolution; or file a formal complaint. Copies of the procedures for making a complaint are available at http://diversity.harvard.edu/pages/title-ix-sexual-harassment
Timeline for Filing and Investigating a Complaint

A complaint can be filed at any time. Investigations will be handled promptly and ordinarily will be completed within 60 days of filing. Interim measures designed to support and protect the Initiating Party or the University community may be considered or implemented at any time, including during a request for information or advice, informal resolution, or a formal complaint proceeding. Consistent with School or unit policy, interim measures might include, among others: restrictions on contact; course-schedule or work-schedule alterations; changes in housing, if appropriate; leaves of absence; or increased monitoring of certain areas of the campus.
Sexual assault which refers to any involuntary sexual act in which a person is threatened, coerced, or forced to engage against their will, or any non-consensual sexual touching of a person.
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