Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

This sentence really tied the room together.

No description
by

Scott Bevill

on 28 March 2017

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of This sentence really tied the room together.

This sentence really tied the room together.
Pointing Words
Using
pointing words
like
this
,
these
,
that
,
those
,
their
, and
such
along with basic pronouns like
she
,
he
,
his
,
her
,
it
,
they
, and
their
effectively can bind your sentences together like a chain.

Used poorly or ambiguously,
they
can make your
readers
confused. "This what? Those who? Argh!"
they'll
scream, tossing your manuscript into the fireplace.

Related to this point, you are writing about the text. Not the reader. Don't direct your reader through the clumsy use of "you" or "one." Instead, just make a clear statement about the text.

Not
: "You might think that Don Quixote is crazy, but..."
Instead
: "Don Quixote's apparent madness complicates his character, but..."
Your Key Terms
Find a touchstone in your argument--a key phrase or set of phrases that you used in your opening paragraph or thesis. Try to emphasize it once or twice throughout your paper. It's like a shining beacon aimed directly at the point.
Repetition not Redundancy
Lots of these techniques involve ways of
repeating yourself
, but with a slight difference.
Moving your paper forward
doesn't necessarily mean cramming every new idea you can think of into your paragraphs.

Instead,
build bridges
.
Re-introduce
the concept, but not necessarily with the same words. Strengthen
connections
to your previous paragraphs and cultivate them for your next paragraphs.

These are echoes that
reinforce
your main argument, but allow your reader to more easily
transition
to your next point. If you
repeat
yourself in varied and interesting ways as a means of
advancing your argument
, you aren't redundant.

You are scaffolding an argument that moves from the foundation of a
claim
to the structure of
support
and the capstone of a
conclusion
.
Conceptual Transitions
In transitioning between paragraphs, it is often not enough to rely on adverbs or short transitional phrases.
Some ideas are simply too big
.

In these cases
, you should
still
strive to create a conceptual link between the topics of each paragraph. Here are a few ideas.
Transition Terms
To keep your readers following along, you should
not only
connect your sentences,
but also
indicate the kind of connection you make.
Addition and Elaboration
also
and
besides
furthermore
in addition
indeed
in fact
moreover
so too
Examples and Conclusions
after all
as an illustration
for example
for instance
specifically
to take a case in point
consider
Comparison and Contrast
along the same lines
in the same way
likewise
similarly
in the same manner
like
as in
Cause and Effect / Concession
accordingly
as a result
consequently
hence
since
so
then
therefore
thus
actually
by extension
in short
that is
in other words
to put it another way
to put it bluntly
to put it succinctly
ultimately
not only...but also
as a result
consequently
hence
in conclusion
in short
in sum
therefore
thus
to sum up
to summarize
although
but
by contrast
conversely
despite
even though
however
in contrast
nevertheless
nonetheless
on the contrary
on the other hand
regardless
whereas
while yet
admittedly
although it is true
granted
naturally
of course
to be sure
The interesting thing about transitions is that they
not only
allow your readers to follow your argument,
but they also
force you to have an argument in the first place. Use them!
Contradictions

It's clear, then, that the
majority of people are not in favor of pickles
on their Chick-Fil-A sandwiches.

Despite the overwhelming evidence against the practice
, however, CFA continues to insist on ruining a perfectly good sandwich with pickles.
Expanding and Connecting Ideas

On the whole,
students at the University of Tennessee
showed a much larger appreciation for the color orange than the national average--nearly 95% of them are big fans.

This phenomenon is
by no means unique
to UT. Students at Clemson and the University of Texas also seem to favor the bright color, although they had some quibbles over the specific hue.

The
Holland soccer team
had no comment.
Narrowing the Focus

After these long years of research, Smith and Jones finally published
their study
on the secrets of the universe.

Taking a closer look
at their published findings, we only find more evidence of their brilliance.
Take a look at your draft.
Highlight
or
circle
every
transition opportunity
within the paper--both at the sentence and paragraph level.
What tricks do you use to keep the paper moving?
Does your paper
feel connected
?
Are there passages that are difficult to follow?
Choose at least 3 of these transition opportunities and rewrite them using some of the techniques we just introduced.
For the Rest of Class
How Close Reads Work
Introduction
Makes a claim
about how to read your text by focusing on a smaller portion of the text.
This means you've found an interesting way to understand a character's motivations, a plot development, or a theme.
Also called a
Thesis Statement
.
Uses a key quote or example
from the text that illustrates (but only a taste!) your point.
Clarifies and Defines
the boundaries of your argument (chapter, character, specific theme, terminology, etc...)
Transitions
to your evidence.
Body Paragraph(s)
Examine closely
a small passage that can support your reading.
Use
quotes
,
specific details
, thoughtful commentary.
Answers these questions (and others): Could another reasonable person have a different opinion on this passage? Why is your reading more likely? What happens when you pair possibly contradictory pieces of evidence? How do you resolve the tension? Why is your interpretation valid?
Conclusion
The
So What
to your argument.
How could people misunderstand your text if they misread or overlook a key passage?
Final Thoughts
Full transcript