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Hephaestus God of Metal Work and Fire

Latin Project 1
by

Alexis Skidmore

on 25 September 2012

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Transcript of Hephaestus God of Metal Work and Fire

Hephaestus (Vulcan)
God of Metal Working and Fire Hephaestus was considered a laughing stock of the gods. His lame legs, caused by being thrown off Mount Olympus by Zeus during a quarrel with Hera, were holding him back in the eyes of the "Perfect" Olympians. Hephaestus (Vulcan) Working in his forges Hephaestus is considered the most human of all the gods. His symbols, such as the anvil, the hammer and the tongs, show that he is a craftsman among the gods. Working with his hands, like humans must, was considered very inferior by the other gods. Before Hephaestus took his place among the gods, he lived with sea nymphs who taught him how to make jewelry. Using the skills learned from the nymphs, Hephaestus created a beautiful throne for Hera. The throne however, was a trap created as punishment for her involvement in his crippling fall. Hera on her throne Hephaestus was chosen by Zeus to create Pandora, the first woman, and the chains to hold Prometheus to the mountain. He also created the palace of the gods, and Zeus's lightning bolts. Zeus with his lightning bolt Hephaestus was married to Aphrodite, a "gift" from Hera (a punishment for trapping her in the throne). Aphrodite was not pleased to be betrothed to Hephaestus and had several affairs, mostly with the god of war, Ares. Once Hera took a seat, she was imprisoned. Dionysus (the god of wine and festivity) tricked Hephaestus into giving him the keys to the throne by getting him drunk, and released Hera from her captivity. Although Hephaestus was belittled and mocked, he created weapons, armor, jewelry, luxuries, and other gifts for the gods. Hephaestus, fed up with the betrayal, crafted a golden net to capture the lovers. Once within the trap, Hephaestus summoned all other gods in an attempt to disgrace the two, but was displeased when the other gods pointed and laughed at him instead. Hephaestus is associated with anything fire, or working related. The Romans, created their own explanations for earthquakes; it was the pounding of Hephaestus' hammers. Although the fire god was considered crippled and inferior, even a raging fire can start from just a delicate spark... Bibliography "Ancient Greek & Roman Sculpture: Aphrodite Venus De Milo." Ancient Greek & Roman Sculpture: Aphrodite Venus De Milo. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Sept. 2012. <http://www.theoi.com/Gallery/S10.2.html>.
"Burning Flames Yellow Fire Wallpaper." And Picture. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Sept. 2012. <http://www.layoutsparks.com/1/231919/burning-flames-yellow-fire.html>.
"Hephaestus." Hephaestus. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Sept. 2012. <http://levigilant.com/Bulfinch_Mythology/bulfinch.englishatheist.org/b/pantheon/Hephaestus.html>.
"Hephaestus (Vulcan) Photo: Hephaestus Catches Aphrodite and Ares." Shmoop. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Sept. 2012. <http://www.shmoop.com/hephaestus-vulcan/photo-hephaestus-catches-aphrodite-ares.html>.
"WORKS OF HEPHAESTUS 1 : Greek Mythology." WORKS OF HEPHAESTUS 1 : Greek Mythology. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Sept. 2012. <http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/HephaistosWorks.html>.
"Hephaestus." U*X*L Encyclopedia of World Mythology. Vol. 3. Detroit: UXL, 2009. 507-511. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 19 Sep. 2012.
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