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The challenges of measuring resilience

Explores some of the methodological and political challenges associated with measuring resilience. Presented as part of the 'International Perspectives on Resilience' workshop organised by the German Academy of Science and Engineering.
by

Tim Prior

on 20 August 2014

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Transcript of The challenges of measuring resilience

Measuring resilience
methodological and political challenges
Tim Prior
, Risk and Resilience Research Group
Center for Security Studies (CSS), ETH Zurich
Resilience and Economic Geography, 6th May, 2014
the deeper you go, the more you need to consider
are we in a position to actually start measuring resilience?
what is
resilience?

some specific
challenges?

what's the politics
behind the policy?

entity-specific
to raise
awareness
to monitor policy performance
there are several commonly identified reasons to measure
resilience
to characterise resilience
to allocate
resources
to build
resilience
some entities adapt
some entities 'bounce back'
resilience vs recovery?
some don't...
quantitative
and
relative
Enhanced Critical Infrastructure Protection Program
for example...
which approach is best?
should the measure be absolute, or relative?
again, context specific
should the approach be qualitative or quantitative?
simplifying complexity
absolute vs relative
what indicators? are they arbitrary?
data quality/availability/suitability
is the context appropriate?
does the measure fit the purpose?
who or what is resilience for?
who determines what resilience is?
who should assume tasks and responsibility
for ensuring or assuring resilience?
Tim Prior
Team Leader, Risk and Resilience
Center for Security Studies (CSS), ETH Zurich
priort@ethz.ch
Thought and ideas?
why measure
it?

The reason will determine your approach
r
e
s
i
l
e
n
c
e
Seems easy enough...
i
for society?
sharing responsibility?
how they bounce back?
how they adapt?
how they share information?
community leaders?
because of trust?
all of this?
Full transcript