Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Naming Rules and Other Stuff

An explanation of naming rules for different compounds, HOFBrINCl, and balancing equations.
by

Liam Hilliard

on 9 October 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Naming Rules and Other Stuff

Naming Rules and Other Stuff An explanation of weird chemistry things Naming ionic compounds is easy. Take the full names of both the chemicals, placing the cation before the anion, and change the ending of the anion's name to -ide.

Examples:
Mg+2O = Magnesium + Oxygen
Magnesium Oxide.

AlN = Aluminum + Nitrogen
Aluminum Nitride Ionic Compound Naming Rules To get a chemical's formula, figure out how many electrons both elements must lose or gain for it to become an ion. That is it's charge. (Ex:Oxygen gains 2 electrons. It's charge is -2.) Cross the charges over. If they are equal, they cancel each other out. If one of them is 1, don't put anything down.
Ex: Potassium Phosphide
K(+1) + P(-3)
K3P
Strontium Sulphide
Sr(+2) + O(-2)
SrO Note: Prezi does not have subscript or superscript. Sorry. To name an ionic compound with a polyatomic ion attatched, just take the full name of the anion and the full name of the polyatomic ion, and put the anion first.
Ex: MgCO3 = Magnesium Carbonate
Al(OH)3 = Aluminum Hydroxide Naming Ionic Compounds w/ Polyatomic Ions To make a chemical formula for an ionic compound with a polyatomic ion, take the charge of the anion and the charge of the polyatomic ion, if it has one, and cross them over. If one of the charges is a 1, don't write anything. If they are equal, they cancel each other out. If the polyatomic ion already has a subscript number on its right, then put brackets around the polyatomic ion (including the subscript number) and put the charge from the anion outside the brackets on the right. To name ionic compounds with multivalent metals in them, take the name of the metal first, and put the charge it has in roman numerals, in brackets, to the right of the metal's name. Then take the anion's name and change the ending to -ide.
Ex: Fe2O3 = Iron (III) Oxide
CuS = Copper (II) Sulphide Naming Ionic Compounds w/ Multivalent Metals
(Stock System) To write the chemical formula for an ionic compound with a multivalent element, take the metal's charge in the brackets, and cross it over with the anion's charge. If they're equal, they cancel each other. If one charge divides by the other, divide.
Ex: Chromium (VI) Nitride = CrN2
Manganese (II) Fluoride = MnF2 Naming Ionic Compounds w/ Multivalent Metals
(Classical System) To name an ionic compound with a multivalent element in it, take the latin root of the multivalent element, and change the ending to -ous for the lower charge and -ic for the higher. Some charges do not have suffixes. Take the full name of the anion and change the ending to -ide, and place it after the multivalent metal.
Ex: Sn3N4 = Tin (IV) + Nitrogen
= Stannic Nitride
CoI2 = Cobalt (II) + Iodine = Cobaltous Iodide To make the chemical formula for ionic compounds w/ multivalent metals, take the charge of the multivalent metal and the charge of the anion, and cross them over. Remember that an -ous suffix on the multivalent metal means a lower charge, while -ic means higher. To name a molecular compound, take the prefix that corresponds to the the number of atoms of the element there are, and put it before the full name of the element. If there is one of the first element, do not put a prefix. If there is one of the second element, the prefix is mono-. Change the ending of the second element to -ide.
Ex: P3S5 = Triphosphorus pentasulphide
F7I = Heptafluoride monoiodide Naming Molecular Compounds Mono = 1
Di = 2
Tri = 3
Tetra = 4
Penta = 5
Hexa = 6
Hepta = 7
Octa = 8
Nona = 9
Deca = 10 To form the chemical formula for molecular compounds, take the number that corresponds to the prefix on the element and put it in subscript to the right of the element's atomic symbol. If the first element has no prefix, it's number is 1. If the numbers are even, they cancel each other out. If one divides by the other, divide.
Ex: Nononitrogen disulphide = N9S2
Selenium pentaoxide = SeO5 HOFBrINCl is:
Hydrogen
Oxygen
Fluorine
BRomine
Iodine
Nitrogen and
ChLorine.

These elements are diatomic, which means that they cannot be found alone without being bonded to another element. If they are the only elemnt, there must be two of them. HOFBrINCl Balancing chemical equations is used to make the number of atoms of each molecule even on both sides of a chemical equation. It works like this:
CH4 + 02 -> CO2 + H20
On the left there are:
1 Carbon
4 Hydrogen
2 Oxygen
On the right there are:
1 Carbon
1 Hydrogen
3 Oxygen
We can balance the Hydrogen like so:
CH4 + 02 -> CO2 + 2H20
On the right there are now:
1Carbon
4 Hydrogen
4 Oxygen
Since we have an O2 on the left, it is easy to then balance out the oxygen:
CH4 + 202 -> CO2 + 2H2O
On the left there are now:
1 Carbon
4 Hydrogen
4 Oxygen
The equation is now balanced. Balancing Chemical Equations Another example:
Mg + Mn2O3 -> MgO + Mn

On the left we have:
1 Magnesium
2 Manganese
3 Oxygen

On the right we have:
1 Magnesium
1 Manganese
1 Oxygen

We can balance the oxygen like so:
Mg + Mn2O3 -> 3MgO + Mn

On the right we now have:
3 Magnesium
1 Manganese
3 Oxygen

Since the magnesium and manganese are seperate on one side or the other, it is easy to balance them, like so:
3Mg + Mn2O3 -> 3MgO + 2Mn

On the left we now have:
3 Magnesium
2 Manganese
3 Oxygen

On the right:
3 Magnesium
2 Manganese
3 Oxygen

The equation is now balanced. Liam Hilliard
SNC2DT
Oct. 7, 2012
Full transcript