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Surrealism

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on 19 September 2013

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Transcript of Surrealism

Surrealism
Background
Surrealism
- surpassing reality. According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, "the principles, ideals, or practice of producing fantastic or incongruous imagery or effects in art, literature, film, or theater by means of unnatural or irrational juxtapositions and combinations"
The Surrealist Movement
originated in France and followed immediately after Dadaism
The phrase
"Surrealism"
first coined by Guillaume Apollinaire in 1917, officially founded in 1924 and continued for a short time giving way to such movements as The Theatre of Cruelty and The Theatre of The Absurd
Apollinaire
, the father of the movement, Andre
Breton
spokesperson, and Antonin
Artaud
writer
Artist of the movement
Salvador Dali

Background Continued
Purpose
was to explore ones subconscious, dreams, and provoke political, social, literary, and philosophical thoughts
The movement paid homage to Freud's writings on free association and dream analysis
Staging & Techniques
of the movement were to use a dream-like state sets while using element of surprise and shock
A Musical Adaptation
Conclusion
Surrealism- surpass reality
was a result of the short lived Dada Movement
originated in Paris, France (1917) 1920's-1930's
focused on the subconscious mind (Freud) because this was true reality
was more successful in literary, artistic, and film
was absorbed greatly by the Absurdity Movement

Works Cited
McKenzie, E. (n.d.). Surrealism in Theatre. Theatre.Web.www.entertainmentguide.local.com/surrealism-theatre

Operaoftheyear."Les mamelles de Tirésias-Opera of the Year Mezzo (English version). "Online video clip.
YouTube. YouTube, 9 Nov 2011. Web. 1 Sept. 2013.

"surreal." Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, 2013. Web. 8 Sept. 2013.

"Surrealism." Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6Th Edition (2013): 1. MasterFILE Premier. Web. 11 Sept. 2013.

SFA to stage surreal comedy 'The Breasts of Tiresias' .http://www.sfasu.edu. web. 12 Sept. 2013






Key Players
Gulliaume Apollinaire
1880-1918 a poet wrote and produced the play Les Mamelles de Tirésias/The Breast of Tiresias 1917 he also inspired the cubist movement with the book The Cubist Painter

Andre Breton
1896-1966 was in the audience at the 1917 debut of The Breast of Tiresias and would take the reigns of the movement after Apollinaires death in 1918. He wrote a variety of poems, prose, and several manifestos.
Antonin Artaud
1896-1948 a french playwright, poet, and actor/director. Best known for creating Theatre of Cruelty. Plays included The Mad Mother and Upset Stomach.
Plot
2 Act Play/Opera
Play begins with a Prologue

Act 1
Therese frustrated with being woman becomes a man, Tiresias, after her breasts turn into balloons and float away. She ties and dresses her husband up as a woman. 2 drunks kill each other the towns people mourn. Tiresias becomes a general and a member of parliament waging war on childbirth. The husband finds a way to have babies and gives birth to 40049 children in 1 day. The 2 drunks return from the dead
Dialogue from Act 1

Therese
You’re right I’m no longer your wife
Husband
Oh really?
Therese
And yet I am Therese
Husband
Oh really?
Therese
But Therese who is no longer a woman



Husband
This is too much
Therese
And as I have become a fine fellow
Husband
Detail that I missed
Therese
From now on I’ll wear a man’s name Tiresias
Husband
Adios
From The Prologue
"We’re trying to bring a new spirit into the theatre
A joyfulness voluptuousness virtue

We bring a play that deals with children
And family values

The actors will not adopt a sinister tone
They will simply appeal to your common sense
And above all will try to entertain you
So that you will be inclined to profit
From all the lessons that the play contains
And so that the earth will be starred with the glances of infants
More numerous than the twinkling stars"

Costumes par Serge Férat, 1917
http://www.hs-augsburg.de
Act 2
The husband is proud of his bundles of joy who have made him lots of money in the arts. A journalist visits him. Then a policeman visits to tell him people are dying from his over population. He suggest the help of a fortune teller. The fortune teller says the husband will be rich and the policeman will die poor. Insulted by this, the policeman tries to arrest her, but she strangles him. She then reveals herself to be Therese. The couple reunite and the townspeople gather on the stage.
Salvador Dali
"Zany," "visually interesting," and "way out of the ordinary" are some of the descriptive phrases Stephen F. Austin State University Associate Professor Rick Jones uses to describe the School of Theatre's upcoming production of Guillame Apollinaire's "The Breasts of Tiresias."
"We made some adaptations, but it's a pretty straight forward translation," Jones said. "It's about an hour long and really quite funny, in a Monty Python sort of way, complete with exaggerated movement, silly voices and cross-dressing."
The Breasts of Tiresias
Characters
Therese/Tiresias/Fortuneteller
The Husband
The Policeman
Lacouf
Presto
Reporter
The People of Zanziba

Made into an opera in 1947 by Francis Poulenc
Full transcript