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Thesis Statements

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by

Jason Ellis

on 3 October 2012

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Transcript of Thesis Statements

The Thesis Statement Think of your introduction paragraph like a funnel.

-First is the HOOK: It grabs your reader's attention with a general statement about your topic! (1 sentence)

-Next, give a brief explanation of your topic, taking time to narrow the topic from a broad understanding (ex. Drinks) to less broad (ex. Colas) to finally YOUR SPECIFIC NARROW TOPIC (ex. Coca-Cola and Pepsi) (2-5 sentences)

-End your introduction with a strong statement/claim that tells your reader what you intend to prove to them about your topic. (1 sentence) Today's focus is on creating that thesis statement The THESIS is a single declarative sentence that expresses your narrowed topic and your feelings about that topic. So that means a thesis is never . . . An Announcement
Example: I am going to talk about five reasons why Cincinnati should build a light rail system. Your thesis tells your reader your position on your topic.
Example: Cincinnati should build a light rail system for several reasons. -This is not a thesis. This only tells the audience what you're going to tell them. -This is a successful thesis statement No one should ever argue with a fact because there's no real room for debate. Your thesis should take a STAND! Once you state your thesis statement, the rest of your paper should be you convincing your reader why your opinion is correct. Your thesis should be an arguable opinion -NOT a fact. Also if your thesis is something that is generally agreed upon or accepted, then there is no reason to try to persuade people. To sum it all up, the thesis answers the most important question of your paper: What is the point? Briefly Explains, Establishes,
and Narrows the Topic Hook:
An Attention Grabber Thesis (cc) photo by twicepix on Flickr (cc) photo by tudor on Flickr A Funnel! Here's how it works: A thesis consists of two parts: Topic + Assertion First of all, the topic portion of your thesis statement is just your narrowed topic. It's easy. You just say it! Example Assignment:

Let's say we're writing about things to do in the Cincinnati area.
We could have narrowed our topic to something which would look like this: Cincy
Attractions Family Singles Sports Reds Bengals Bearcats King's Island Museum
Center Zoo Mainstrasse Art Museum Bars in UC Area So . . . .
The Topic is: The Cincinnati Zoo Thesis: The Cincinnati Zoo + Our Assertion Next is the assertion. But what's an assertion? The second part of a thesis statement goes by lots of names:
argument
opinion
position
claim
plan of development
or assertion. But think about it this way. . . You can. . . make an assertion
. . . stake a claim.
. . . take a position.
. . . argue a point. Active vs Passive You can only have an opinion... In writing, it's always better to be active. An assertion is a voiced opinion. Our assertion needs to be our opinion about our topic: the Cincinnati Zoo. So . . . .
The Topic is: The Cincinnati Zoo Thesis: The Cincinnati Zoo + Our Assertion Thesis: The Cincinnati Zoo is a great family attraction in the Cincinnati area. This a great thesis because . . . 1. Lot's of other people could disagree with us
2. It leaves us plenty of room to explain reasons
why we feel that way. Let's get started! A thesis, when correctly used, can be a powerful tool for communication. and the best part is . . . The rest of your essay practically writes itself as long as you've done all the hard work of making your job easier. Thesis Topic + Assertion
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