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Responsive Workflow Design

Presentation given by Liz Woolcott and Clint Pumphrey at the American Library Association Annual Conference, June 2014, Las Vegas, Nevada
by

Liz Woolcott

on 6 April 2015

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Transcript of Responsive Workflow Design

Dublin Core Records



MARC Records




EAD Records
Responsive Workflow Design :


Overview
Developing the idea
Special Collections strategic initiative and position review
External needs
Internal needs
Position recommendations
Getting approval from administration
Cross-departmental positions
Temporary staffing
Hiring
Training
Extensive initial training sessions:
Archival Processing
Software
CONTENTdm
OXYGEN
Connexion
Sierra (III)
Standards/Formats/Rule
EAD
Dublin Core
DACS
MARC
AACR2
RDA
ISBD Punctuation
Subject headings
Local notes
Controlled vocabularies
AAT
TGN
AFS Ethnographic Thesaurus
Problem 1: Workflow Disconnects
Problem 2: Backlogs and Staffing Shortages
Thinking outside the "departmental" box
Measuring Success
Future
Problems
Catalogers/Metadata specialists redoing work done by Special Collections staff
Skill sets for both kinds of work are very similar
Implementation
Future
Same Content, Three Outputs
Automation
Automation stumbling blocks:
Each data format has a separate set of rules for determining:
Formatting
Content
What information to record
Main source of information
Display of the record often determines how the content is recorded
1:1 or 1:many relationships


Duplication
Archives Needs
Existing manuscript backlog of approximately 1300 linear feet (limited or no accessibility)
New donations sometimes demand quick turnaround
Vast majority of processing done by students; oversight and editing can bog down supervisor


Digital Needs
Additional staffing for
Processing
Creating metadata
Quality control
Promotion
Prefer Special Collections experience
Backlogs:
13,000 digital items needing metadata
Additional collections on hold
Cataloging Needs
Additional staffing for:
Multiple retro Special Collections projects
Authority Control checks
Processing
Backlogs:
est. 20-25,000 catalog cards checked against online catalog
est. 50% would require original/copy cataloging

Added benefits for team members
Broad list of skills :
Software experience
Rules and standards
Service:
Library committees
Reference desks
Flexibility for team members to pursue interests
Tangible projects with goals and deliverables
Take Aways
Training takes time, plan for it
Plan for the workload of the supervisor to double in the beginning
Just remember - the long term benefit is greater than the upfront cost
Communication is essential
Measure success visually
For your team
For your administrators
Immediate Projects
Manuscript processing projects
Identifying material for digitization
Adding new digital collections
Look at bulk digitization
Ongoing retro cataloging for Special Collections
Reevaluating Positions
Recalibrating responsibilities as projects are completed
Making one or more position permanent
Responding to changes in leadership
Assessing and Modifying Workflows
Are our workflows creating backlogs in the first place?
How do we prevent this in the future?
How can we create archival descriptions once and then extrapolate into other formats?
What are the perspectives of the SWAT team members?
How would they streamline the workflow process?
Presented at:
American Library Association Conference
Las Vegas, Nevada, June 28, 2014

Creating collaborative
cross-departmental
teams for Cataloging, Digital, and Archives

Liz Woolcott
Digital Discovery Library
Utah State University
liz.woolcott@usu.edu

Clint Pumphrey
Manuscript Archivist
Utah State University
clint.pumphrey@usu.edu

Meaning often implied by structure
Structure is not preserved
in automation
Converting EAD
Catalog
at the folder level...


...or
at the item level
Workflow disconnects
Backlogs and staffing shortages
Developing the Idea
Hiring
Training
Measuring success
Immediate projects
Reevaluating positions
Assessing and modifying workflows
Qualities sought by hiring committee
Backgrounds and skill sets of those hired
Qualities necessary according to those hired
Omeka
Excel
History Pin
Trello
Digital exhibit building
Digitization
Digital format conversion
Dedicated staff can knock out backlogs more efficiently than dedicated staff time
Moral boosting for rest of staff
Responsive teams can meet deadlines faster
Team based approaches provide support systems
Planning
Positives
Summer Training Series
Phased Training
Phase 1 - Metadata Creation (3 months)
Phase 2 - Cataloging (3 months)
Phase 3 - Archival Processing (1 month)
Peer-to-Peer Training
Multiple trainings due to fluctuations in metadata team
Initial training by Metadata Librarian
Subsequent trainings done by team members
Quality Control
Peer review
Work Silos
Traditional departmental structures
Focus on individual departmental workloads leads to:
Inefficiencies
Staff
Resources
Time
Lost opportunities
S
trategic
W
ork
A
nd
T
actics
Our fantastic team: Seth, Rosie, and Anna
Dec 2013-May 2014
Feb -May 2014
Full transcript