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Adjectives and Adverbs

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Claire Barbrack

on 28 February 2014

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Transcript of Adjectives and Adverbs

All About Adjectives and Adverbs
A Project by Claire Barbrack
What's an adjective?
An
adjective
is a word or phrase that modifies (or describes) a noun.

So, an adjective is a description word. It describes other people, places, things, or ideas.
Examples of Adjectives:
The
big
dog had
fluffy
fur.
"Big" is describing the dog.
"Fluffy" is describing the dog's fur.
(modifying)
(modifying)
But, what if we said this?
The dog was
big
. Its fur was
fluffy
.
Are "big" and "fluffy" still adjectives?
Yes. They describe "dog" and "fur."
How is this possible?
The dog was big. Its fur was fluffy.
"Big" and "Fluffy" are following "was." "Was" is a linking verb (usually a form of the verb "to be") that connects the adjective to the subject. "Big" and "Fluffy" are
predicate adjectives.
Predicate Adjectives:
Predicate adjectives (also called subject complements) describe the subject and are followed by a linking verb. Most linking verbs are forms of the verb "to be."

(examples of linking verbs)- is, are, was
an adjective that is usually capitalized and is derived from a proper noun
Example:

Ming is eating
Chinese
food.
comes from the proper noun "China" and is capitalized
What is an article?
An article is an adjective. It modifies a noun. An article can be indefinite or definite.
Indefinite
Definite
-a
-an
-the
More about articles
What do "indefinite" and "definite" mean?
"Definite" is very specific.

(example)- Pick up
the
book.

"The" is telling you that it has to be that specific book.
"Indefinite" is less direct and specific.

(example)- Pick up
a
book.

"A" is not telling you specifically which book. You could pick up any book.
An
adverb
is word that modifies, or describes, a verb, an adjective, or another adverb.

(example)- Julia chose
wisely
.

"Wisely" is telling you more about
how
Julia chose. It describes the verb "chose."

When an adverb is describing a verb, it can tell you
how, when,
or
where.
What is an adverb?
All About Demonstratives
A demonstrative points out (demonstrates) people, places, or things.
Four demonstratives:
that, this, these, and those
Demonstrative Adjectives VS. Demonstrative Pronouns
Demonstrative Adjectives describe and come before nouns.

(example)-
That
bike is weird.

"That" is followed by and describes "bike."


Demonstrative Pronouns stand on their own.

(example)-
This
is weird.


"This" is not describing anything. It stands on its own as the subject.
INTENSIFIERS
An i
ntensifier
is an adverb that emphasizes an adjective or adverb.


(example)- Abby is
extremely
slow.

"Extremely" is emphasizing Abby's slowness. "Slow" is an adjective. "Extremely" is modifying "slow."
Comparative and Superlative Adjectives
The
comparative
form of an adjective compares two things or people.
Adjectives
Adverbs
Both
Proper Adjectives
The
superlative
form compares
more than
two things or people
Adjective
Comparative
Superlative
big
bigger
b
biggest
late
later
latest
large
larger
largest
These are just a few examples. Some Comparative and superlative forms are irregular.
We use comparative and superlative adjectives to compare things or people.
Good or Well?
Bad or Badly?
Good
and
bad
are adjectives. You should use them after linking verbs.

(example)- The weather was
good.
(example)- Those cookies were
bad.
(They are both following linking verbs)
Well
and
badly
are adverbs. You should use them to describe action verbs.
Well
is also used to describe someone's health.

(example)- Carrie didn't feel
well
.
(example)- She sings so
badly.
(
Well
is describing Carrie's health, and
Badly
is describing "sings," an action verb)
hmm...
Thanks for Watching!



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