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Experimental cooking

Judit Aláez and Mireia Costa (CLIL)
by

Judit Aláez

on 10 January 2013

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Transcript of Experimental cooking

Activity 4: The Dinner Time: 120' Judit Aláez de la Mata
&
Mireia Costa Merino Experimental cooking Age of students: 11

Grade: 5th

English level: A1-A2

Assumed knowledge:
MATHEMATICAL:
- Simple operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division)
- Percentages
- Fractions
- Graphs
- Usage of currency

ENGLISH:
- Understand and follow and produce simple instructions
- Exchange of cotidian messages
- Really basic cooking related vocabulary Assumed knowledge: Step 2: Writing a recipe. Time: 45’ Materials:
- Blackboard
- White sheets
- Supermarket catalogues
- Craft Paper
- Writing tools

Language Objectives:
- Learning to read, understand and use recipes.
- Being able to identify and use linking words and cooking related vocabulary.
- Being able to answer wh-questions.

Content Objectives:
- To understand and visualize the quantities in a recipe regardless of how they are written.

Procedural Objectives:
- Being able to write a recipe from scratch.
- Being able to remember all the previous Mathematical and English knowledge. Activity 1: The recipe “Oh my God! I’m starving, I’ve completely forgotten about having lunch today, so I’ve thought that it would be amazing if we could prepare a nice dish in class”. Then the teacher will include: “I love Indian food, my favourite dish is Chicken Tikka Massala”.

“What’s your favourite dish?” we expect the children to answer “I love...” or “My favourite dish is...”


INGREDIENTS + QUANTITIES + HOW = RECIPE

Skills used:
- Literacy

Target Language (vocabulary and language structures):
- “What’s your favourite dish?”; “I love...”; “My favourite dish is...”, “I eat...in a restaurant”, “I eat it at home”; “A half”; “A quarter”; “300 grams”; “A cup”; “A litre”; “A spoonful”; “recipe”; “cut”; “fry”; “clean”; “peel”; “slice”; “chop”; “bake”; “cook”; “boil”; “whisk”...

Concepts:
- Instructive text, recipe.
- Ingredients, quantities and cooking verbs.
- Infinitives. Step 1: The recipe. Time: 45’ The teacher will introduce the activity saying: “Now that we know how to write a recipe,
we should write the recipes for our favourite dishes. Don’t you think that it can be a really cool idea to create our recipe book? Let’s do it then!”

Skills:
- Drawing and/or collage composition
- Literacy

Target Language (vocabulary and language structures):
“A half”; “A quarter”; “300 grams”; “A cup”; “A litre”; “A spoonful”; “recipe”; “cut”; “fry”; “clean”; “peel”; “slice”; “chop”; “bake”; “cook”; “boil”; “whisk”...

Concepts:
- Instructive text, recipe.
- Ingredients, quantities and cooking verbs.
- Infinitives. Activity 2: Invitations Dear Family;

I’m really proud of the recipe I’ve written in class,
so I’d like to invite you to the party we are going to have in school on the 4th of May.
We will meet all together in the main entry of the school and then we will go to the school hall
and you’ll be able to taste all our dishes!
If you wish, you can help me to write another recipe at home and bring it to class in the morning.
Feel free to bring any other dishes you want.
Hope to see you then.
NAME, 5A (Train drivers) Materials:
-Blackboard
-White sheets
-Craft Paper
-Writing tools
-Computers

Language Objectives:
- Learning to read, understand and use invitations.
- Being able to identify and use linking words and party related vocabulary.
- Being able to answer How much/How many questions and open questions in a long way..
- Being able to write letters home.

Content Objectives:
- To understand, visualize and be able to use fractions and currency regardless of how they are written.

Procedural Objectives:
- Being able to write a letter home and invitations.
- Being able to remember all the previous Mathematical and English knowledge.
- Being able to create a Glogster using the instructions provided by the teacher. Step 1: Invitations. Time: 40’ Problem 2:Sandra buys for the party a box of blueberry, poppy seed, and chocolate-chip muffins. There are 2 blueberry muffins and 3/4 are chocolate-chip muffins in the box. if we know the boxes contain a dozen muffins, how many poppy seed muffins are in the box? Each box costs 2.5€ how much does Sandra spend on each type of muffin? Problem 3:
I’ve spent 150€ in total buying the invitations for the party. I’ve already bought 15 red invitations, 25 blue invitations and 4 orange invitations. If the red ones are 25€ what’s the percentage or money I’ve spent on them?
From the money that´s left I’ve spent 2/5 on the orange invitations. How much money do they cost?
The blue ones were 9.5€ cheaper than the oranges. How much does one of the blue ones cost? How much is that percentage from the total of money I’ve spent? Problem 1: In order to have a party, Sara needs 48 paper invitations. She already has 14 blue invitations and 28 red invitations. She wants to buy the rest in colour green. Could you tell me the percentage and the fractions, of blue and red invitations she has (once she has bought the green invitations)? How many more invitations should Sara buy? What percentage and fraction is it from the total of invitations? “Do you remember we wrote down the recipe book of the classroom? I was really hungry when I arrived home and I’ve tried them all. They were delicious! So I’ve thought we can organise a party with all the dishes we included in the book. Do you like the idea?”. "The most important thing to organize a party is food, do you agree?"

Skills:
- Literacy
- Mathematical

Target Language (vocabulary and language structures):
“How much.../ How many...”; “cheaper than”; “more expensive than”; “percentage”; “fractions”; “currency”; “Euros”.

Concepts:
- Problem resolution.
- How much/How many questions
- Long answers to open questions. Step 2: Our invitations! Time: 20’ “So, now that we have solved those problems, it would be nice if we create our invitations for your families. We’re going to use an online application called Glogster. With this tool we can create amazing and wonderful posters in order to show them to everybody at home”.

Skills:
- Usage of new technologies
- Literacy
- Mathematical

Target Language (vocabulary and language structures):
“How much.../ How many...”; “Glogster”; “Tools”; “Click”; “Post”; “Insert”; “Uploads”; “Remove”; “Text” “Graphics”; “Image”; “Wall”; “Print”; “Audio”; “Video”; “Preview”; “Guests”; “Invitations”; “To meet at...”; “To bring/brought something”.

Concepts:
- Problem resolution.
- Letter home: Invitation to a party
- Ingredients, quantities and cooking verbs.
- How much/How many questions
- Long answers to open questions. Step 2: Where should we sit our guests? Time: 30’ Step 3: The Dinner Party Problem. Time: 30’ Step 1: The furniture. Time: 30’ "Hey, have you noticed that we have a party to organise in a couple of days and we haven’t really thought about how we are going to sit the guests? What kind of things do we need to make this party a success?” “Ok, now we have the words written down in the blackboard we’re going to play a Bingo game about these words”.

Then, the teacher will deal out the flashcards of the words that they worked on before (bingos) one for each child, then, they're going to play this game and the winner can take home the winning flashcard.

Skills:
- Literacy

Target Language (vocabulary and language structures):
“table”; “chairs”; “spoons”; “knives”; “forks”; “candles”...

Concepts:
- Vocabulary (furniture). Materials:
- Blackboard.
- Coloured chalk.
- Tags with “known” / “unknown” written on it
- Flashcards and Bingo materials.
- White sheets.
- Writing tools.

Language Objectives:
- Being able to identify and use linking words and cooking related vocabulary.
- Being able to answer wh-questions.
- Being able to use furniture vocabulary from the dining room.

Content Objectives:
- Learning to read, understand and use graphs to solve mathematical problems.
- To understand and visualize the quantities in a problem regardless of how they are written.
- Use graphs to visualize fractions and solve problems.

Procedural Objectives:
- Being able to interpret graphs and to use them to solve Mathematical problems.
- Being able to remember all the previous Mathematical and English knowledge. Activity 3: The Guests “Ok, now we know what’s important to have for our guests we must know how to sit them, shouldn’t we? Ok, we’re going to work with graphs instead of algebra.
Imagine: we have 4 tables and we’ve already sent 16 invitations, how many guests are going to sit down in each table?”.

Skills:
- Literacy
- Mathematical

Target Language (vocabulary and language structures):
“table”; “chairs”; “guests”; “graphs”; “invitations”...

Concepts:
- Problem resolution.
- Graphs.
- Vocabulary (furniture). Once they have finished and corrected the graph exercises, the teacher will say: “I have a surprise for you! You have been such a great class lately, so I thought that you deserve it. But before I tell you anything, I’ll need you to go through this problem and solve it. It’s a bit of a challenge for you, but I’m sure you’ll manage it fine! ;) The problem is called: The Dinner Party Problem”.

Question: How many people must you have at dinner to ensure that there are a subset of 3 people who are all either mutual acquaintances, or mutual strangers?

Once we finish this activity, the teacher will tell the students that the surprise will be that the next day they’re going to cook their dishes from the recipe book in the kitchen, at school.

Skills:
- Literacy
- Mathematical

Target Language (vocabulary and language structures):
“table”; “chairs”; “spoons”; “knives”; “forks”; “candles”

Concepts:
- Problem resolution.
- Graphs.
- Vocabulary (furniture). Bring colored chalk into the class; draw pictures as you are giving the proof. It doesn't matter if students don't follow the exact argument in class - they will probably go home and want to think about it anyway - but they will draw the pictures you draw and it will help them construct the argument later. We can model this using graph theory; let people be vertices, and draw a red edge between two people if they know each other, and a blue edge if they do not. So every pair of people are connected by either a red or blue edge. What is the least number of vertices for which every complete red-blue graph on those vertices has either a red or blue triangle?
It doesn’t matter how students arrive to the answer, we only care about the process and that they understand that is 6 people! “Good morning children! Do you remember what I told you we’re going to do today?”. We expect the children to say “cooking in the kitchen” “Oh yes, we’re going to cook our favourite dishes at the school kitchen, but can I do whatever I want at the kitchen? Or might I follow some rules?”. We expect the children to say “We might follow rules”. “Yes, that’s true, we MUST follow rules, and which are these rules? I start: Nº1: Don’t run in the kitchen. Which can be the second rule?” “Ok children, now that we know how to behave in the kitchen, we are going to review how a recipe looks and how to measure the food in a recipe. Who can tell me what is the first step when we want to cook something?”.

Skills:
- Literacy
- Mathematical (we can create recipes which need to work with fractions; f/e, write ½ of 400 in order to 200g).

Target Language (vocabulary and language structures):
“table”; “chairs”; “spoons”; “knives”; “forks”; “candles”, “recipe”, “I need...”, “Can you give me..., please?”;
“A half”; “A quarter”; “300 grams”; “A cup”; “A litre”; “A spoonful”; “recipe”; “cut”; “fry”; “clean”; “peel”; “slice”; “chop”; “bake”; “cook”; “boil”; “whisk”, “What’s your favourite dish?”; “I love...”; “My favourite dish is...”, “I eat...in a restaurant”, “I eat it at home”...

Concepts:
- Vocabulary (furniture).
- Cooking verbs.
- Measurement.
- Food vocabulary. To conclude this exercise, we would like to say that we think this is definitely a very viable and interesting approach to the creation of a framework for our classes, and we are sure that we shall use a similar, if not the same approach, ourselves in the future when we have our own classes to plan for. The CLIL approach worked very well for us as it helped us to focus on the content whilst being assured that the language learning objectives would be met.

Furthermore, we find the usage of online applications within the classroom such as Glogster very useful and both believe that they are definitely an interesting way to make the classes more varied. We also believe that it would be worthwhile exploring other edutech options that are available.

By having the students work in groups we were able to ensure a certain level on inclusion within the class, helping to meet the inclusive learning style that all teachers should strive for. We also let the students have considerable input in the classes (for example whilst creating the rules for the kitchen task), this let the students take more responsibility for their own learning and helped us to accommodate their different learning styles, as they could suggest how certain things were done. Conclusions
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