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Responding to Student Writing

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Jennifer Buckner

on 9 January 2012

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Transcript of Responding to Student Writing

You're nothing but
a stack of essays.

Responding to
Student Writing

Jennifer Buckner
Methods for Responding to Writing: Screencasting (video of computer activity)
Methods for Responding to Writing: Rubrics
Methods for Responding to Writing: Letters
Methods for Responding to Writing: Video/Audio
Current Position Statements on Writing Assessment
Principles for Responding
Avoiding the Alice Syndrome:
You're nothing but a stack of papers.
Resources
Composition and History: Timeline. Ohio University. Retrieved from
http://www.english.ohiou.edu/cifer
Jan 7, 2012

Conference on College Composition and Communication. (March 2009) Writing Assessment: A Position Statement. Prepared by CCCC Committee on Assessment, November 2006.

Gottschalk, K. and Hjortshoj, K. (2004) The elements of teaching writing: A resource for instructors in all disciplines. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's.

Huot, B. and O'Neill, P. (2009) Assessing writing: A critical sourcebook. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's.

Council of Writing Program Administrators. NCTE-WPA White Paper on Writing Assessment in Colleges and Universities. Prepared by NCTE and Council of WPA. Retrieved from: http://wpacouncil.org/whitepaper
1
2
3
4
st
nd
Student
English 101
Dear Student,
(questions that stimulate further thought,
summaries of what reader understood,
descriptions of difficulties encountered,
critical & constructive feedback)
Sample Paper
rd
insert
specific
comments
General ---> Specific
illustrate
final
comments
mark patterns
of concern
point to passages
that work
Dear Student,
(questions that stimulate further thought,
summaries of what reader understood,
descriptions of difficulties encountered,
critical & constructive feedback)
General ---> Specific
th
less is more
A-
grade
reply to the writer
in organized comments
focus: 2-3 KEY issues
keep a running list
limit comments =
What can the writer understand
and put to use?
skim batch of papers first
use common handout/mini-lesson for
repeated patterns and problems
request a student conference
baffled?
involve students
point to errors vs. correcting
peer review
cover letters
feedback response & revision
Responding to Online Portfolios
http://screencast.com/t/27t7D19YntH
Methods for Responding to Writing: Annotated Responses
Top of the Page Comment

“Beautiful job, Student. You are a really terrific writer, and your essay reflects your intelligent approach to things. I enjoyed your essay and I learned from it. Thanks.”
http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Journals/EJ/1012-nov2011/EJ1012When.pdf
18th C
Today
1900
1800
focus: Rhetoric (Oratory, Debate)
activities:
1. Reading/Analysis of Model Essays
2. Memorization (figures, tropes, forms)
Assessment: Oral (Conference, Class)
1865
goal: memorize writing concepts
Format: Lecture / Question
+ birth of textbook
(accomodate for increase in young instructors + influx of students in college)
1870
Harvard Exam (1870)
+written entrance exams
= "literacy crisis"
textbooks/assessment: move towards mechanical writing (exercises) and correctness
1950
1930
current-traditional rhetoric
transactional rhetoric
Correctness
espressionist rhetoric
(psychological, individualistic)
Scientific
Thesis-Driven Textbooks
Modal-Driven Pedagogy
Expository Writing
Purpose-Based Approaches
1960
Timeline of Composition Studies
http://www.english.ohiou.edu/cifer_theory
Cognitive Rhetoric
(scientific method empirical data)
Expressivists
1980
self-discovered
self-assessed
Process Pedagogy
Portfolios
Socio-Cultural Theories of Language
Writing assessment should:
reflect human readers: recognizing writing as a "complex and content-rich interaction between people" CCCC
help writers "develop and shape ideas as well as organize, craft sentences, and edit" CCCC
involve multiple sources of feedback (period of ungraded work, peer review)
follow clear communication about expectations & values about writing
focus on what students do well in writing
"should incorporate meaningfully the multiple values and ways of expressing knowledge by students present in the classroom and local communities." WPA
"When I stopped writing on my students’ papers and made use of audio comments instead, I discovered that assessment, which I had always regarded as a
chore, could be a powerful teaching tool and a means of helping my students communicate their thoughts
and opinions in effective and engaging ways. Recording audio comments has helped me deliver feedback on student work that is compatible with my practice of student-centered, responsive writing instruction. And I think my students can hear the difference." (Bauer, 67)
https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B_H9yh2AQaTONzFjNjEyOGItZmZiZi00ZjA3LWEwOGItZDUwZDMyYTI0Mzlj
post-process
1963
Research in
Written Composition

Source: Ohio State University
Full transcript