Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Adoptive Families

No description
by

Leanna Baumgartner

on 26 September 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Adoptive Families

Single Male By: Heather Messer and
Leanna Pinker Adoptive Families Children's Books Adoption is when a biological mother, or parent decide they do not or can not raise their child and decided to give up their legal rights to that child, and adoptive parents agree to take the child into their home to raise and take care of them.
Adoption is a legal act of becoming a parent and is permanent What is adoption? Georgia
Family Structure Married couples: 70.9%
Unmarried couples: 0%
Single Males: 2.6%
Single Females: 26.5% *Open adoption is when there is some
form of communication between the
birth families, adopted child, and
adopted parents. Types of Adoptions Process Myths and Realities about adoption Things you should know! Myth: The United States does not have orphans. *Closed adoption is when there is no
form of communication between the
birth families and adopted parents. No
information is given to either side and all
records are sealed. For finding your mother,
There's one certain test.
You must look for the creature
Who loves you the best.
--- David Kirk (Little Miss Spider) Male kids that are adopted: 52.4%
Female kids that are adopted: 47.6% Alaska Native/American Indian: 0%
Asian: .1%
Black: 34.8%
White: 47.0%
Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander: 0%
Hispanic: 9.0% Highest and Lowest States in each category United States
Family Structure Married Couple Highest: Utah 90.6% Lowest: New York 48.3%
Unmarried Couple Highest: Vermont 9.0% Lowest: Wyoming, Virginia, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Utah, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Alabama, & D.C 0% Wisconsin .4%
Single Female Highest: New York 46.3% Lowest: Utah 8.8%
Single Males Highest: D.C 8.5% Iowa 6.0%Lowest: New Hampshire 0% Arkansas .3% Administration for Children and Families. (2012, July). Adoptive family structure october 1, 2010 to september 30, 2011 (fy 2011). Retrieved from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/stats_research/afcars/statistics/adoptfs_tbl8_2011.pdf
Administration for Children and Families. (2012, July). Sex of public agency children adopted: october 1, 2010 to september 30, 2011 (fy 2011). Retrieved from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/stats_research/afcars/statistics/gender_tbl1_2011.pdf
Administration for Children and Families. (2012, July). Race/ethnicity of public agency children adopted: october 1, 2010 to september 30, 2011 (fy 2011). Retrieved from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/stats_research/afcars/statistics/race_tbl2_2011.pdf Male Highest: D.C 57.5% Delaware 55.8%
Lowest: Hawaii 42.9%

Female Highest: Alaska 57.5%
Lowest: D.C 42.5% Delaware44.2% Adopt Us Kids:
http://www.adoptuskids.org/for-families/how-to-adopt/common-myths-about-adoption#no-orphans
Freddie Mac Foundation Wednesday's Child
http://www.wednesdayschildga.com/
Adoptive Family Support Network: http://afsn.org/
Adoptive Families
http://www.adoptivefamilies.com/articles.php?aid=213 Websites For Families How Teachers can help Adoptive Families Myths and Realities about adoption. Things you should know continued! Local Adoption Agencies familydoctor.org editorial staff. (2010, September). What is an adoption plan?. Retrieved from http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/pregnancy-newborns/caring-for-newborns/adoption/what-is-an-adoption-plan.html/ *Agency adoption is when a private or public
agency arranges the adoption for the adoptive
parents. *Private adoption is when the adoption is arranged by lawyer or another intermediary instead of an agency. *Foster adoption also known as Fost-adopt
is when a child is in foster care and placed in a home
and are adopted by their foster parents. *International adoption is when a child
is adopted from a foreign country. *Step-parent adoption is when a child is adopted my their biological parents new spouse. *Kinship/Relative adoption is when
a biological family member adopts the child. The Wendy's Company. (2012). National adoption center there are no unwanted children, just unfound families. Retrieved from http://www.adopt.org/assembled/types.html First you want to research adoption
Find an agency
Complete a homestudy
Either search for a child or wait to be placed
Be selected
Meet the child
Finalize your adoption Money to Prepare Homestudy fees (couple hundred to several thousands)
Background checks (depends on state and county)
May have to take Parent preparation classes (could be free depending on agency)
Are you going to have to travel? ( travel expenses)
Post Placement Supervision (could be covered by agency)
Attorney fees and court cost
Unexpected (gas, taking time off work)
Raising the child (do you feel financially prepared) The Wendy's Company. (2012). National adoption center there are no unwanted children, just unfound families. Retrieved from http://www.adopt.org/assembled/types.html Waiting to adopt can take up to years depending on the type of adoption you are considering. Wait Time You don’t need to own your own home, be wealthy, have children already, or be a stay-at-home parent to adopt. Most adoptions from U.S. foster care are free and any minimal costs associated with them are often reimbursable. There are 104,000 children waiting to be adopted in the United Sates. Reality: You have to have a lot of money and own a house to adopt from foster care. Myth: Reality: While slightly more than half of all children who enter foster care return to their birth families, there are still thousands of children who cannot return home. Of the 51,000 children in foster care adopted last year, 54 percent were adopted by their foster parents Your not allowed to adopt children you foster Myth: Reality: Experienced parents and empty-nesters are encouraged to adopt. In most instances, you’re eligible to adopt regardless of age, income, marital status, or sexual orientation. You don’t need to own your own home, be young, wealthy, or a stay-at-home parent. You have to be of child-bearing age to adopt. Children in foster care are regular children who, through no fault of their own, had to be removed from their families due to abusive or neglectful situations.
*For adoptive placements: very few birth parents reappear after their parental rights have been legally terminated. In the instances where children have continued relationships with birth relatives, it’s because the arrangement will be beneficial, safe, and healthy for all involved.
*For foster care placements: most children placed in your home will have regular, court-ordered visits with their birth parents. This is an important part of the reunification process and you play an important role by working with the child’s caseworker to decide the location and time of the visits. The court decides whether the visits will be supervised. Adopting or fostering a child who's been removed from the care of their birth parents is dangerous. Myth: Reality: Adoptions of children from U.S. foster care are legally binding agreements that do not occur until the rights of all parents have been legally terminated by a court of law. It’s very rare that an adoption is challenged in court by a child’s birth relative. More than 98 percent of legally completed adoptions remain intact.
*For adoptive placements: very few birth parents reappear after their parental rights have been legally terminated. In the instances where children have continued relationships with birth relatives, it’s because the arrangement will be beneficial, safe, and healthy for all involved.
*For foster care placements: most children placed in your home will have regular, court-ordered visits with their birth parents. This is an important part of the reunification process and you play an important role by working with the child’s caseworker to decide the location and time of the visits A birth parent or another relative can take an adopted child back. Myth: Reality: Myth: Reality: Adoption Exchange Association. (2012). Common myths about adoption. Retrieved from http://www.adoptuskids.org/for-families/how-to-adopt/common-myths-about-adoption Adoption Exchange Association. (2012). Common myths about adoption. Retrieved from http://www.adoptuskids.org/for-families/how-to-adopt/common-myths-about-adoption *Adoption Resources & Counseling, Inc.
4211 Gramercy Main NW
Kennesaw, Georgia
Local phone: 770-919-9801
*Catholic Charities Atlanta
680 West Peachtree St. NW,
Atlanta, Georgia
Local phone: 404-881-6571
*Options 4 Adoption
2930 Nightfall Terrace
Douglasville, Georgia
Local phone: 1-877-828-5522
*HOPE for Children
24 Perimeter Center East
Atlanta, Georgia
Local phone: 770.391.1511 http://www.adoptivefamilies.com/pdf/Adoption_School.pdf

http://www.adoptivefamilies.com/pdf/MemoToTeachers.pdf

http://www.adoptivefamilies.com/pdf/Assignments.pdf
Full transcript