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The Canterbury Tales: The Pardoner

Analyzing the Pardoner
by

Aaron Chang

on 12 March 2010

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Transcript of The Canterbury Tales: The Pardoner

hair as yellow as wax, hanging
down smoothly like a hank of flax his chin no beard had harbored in driblets fell his locks behind his head
down to his shoulders which they overspread I judge he was a gelding
or a mare Deadly Sin Greed/Avarice Lust Chaucer's Opinion
on the Pardoner he was a noble ecclesiast how well he read a lesson
or told a story but best of all he sang
an Offertory Physiognomy and he had bulging eye-balls,
like a hare had the same small voice a
goat has got and (well he would) win
silver from the crowd Pride there was no pardoner of
equal grace He swindles the common man out of his hard earned wealth in order to be in possession of an item that has no worth. Place in Society The role of the Pardoner was to sell indulgences, which granted the buyer
pardon for their sins, but they were
only false pardons. He also commits fraud;
he has false relics which he
claims are real. The Pardoner goes aroound the country selling pardons, relics, bones, and etc, but they are all fake. He takes pride in his ability to sell false hope to people. How well he read a lesson or told a story!
But best of all he sang an Offertory,
For well he knew that when that song was sung
He'd have to preach and tune his honey-tongue. Friedrich Nietzsche: "Man is the cruelest animal."
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