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Point Of View

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Mr. J

on 29 May 2014

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Transcript of Point Of View

Point Of View Lesson
by Mr. Jimenez

What Is Point Of View?
How does Darla feel about having Nemo as a pet?
Point of View is the way the author allows the reader to
what is going on.
The point of view is the perspective of the narrator in the story. You,
the reader
, see the story through the eyes of the narrator which can be either a
First Person
Third Person Limited
Third Person Omniscient
point of view.

Consider the following to understand how perspective can affect a situation....
Point of View is the angle or vantage point from which events of the story are presented.
Point of View is the perspective from which the story is told.
How does Nemo feel about becoming Darla's pet?
First Person Point of View
In this style of narration the person telling the story is
the story. He or she is participating in the action as a character in the narrative.
Clue Words: First Person
Watch for the use of personal pronouns
in this style of narration.
First Person Narration Is Generally.....
First person can be very intimate and often allows access to the main characters innermost thoughts. This helps the reader understand the character's motivation.
In this style of narration the author
speaks directly to the reader.
The author will employ
the pronouns
This Style of
Narration is rare.
Third Person Point of View
In this style of narration, the
character telling the story is not
a participant in the action.
The two most common types of third
person narration are
third-person limited
Third-Person Limited:
The reader is made aware
of the thoughts and feelings of only
one character.
Third-Person Omniscient:
The word

The reader knows the thoughts
and feelings of
the main

Third-person narration is generally...
Time to test your new knowledge:
Can you identify which point of view
is being used in the following situations?
Anita loved classical music, but she did n’t want her friends to know that. She was afraid they would laugh at her. When she was alone in her room, however, the air was hers, and she filled it with the sounds of violins and cellos.

When my father was transferred to Ireland, we all went with him. Our new house was near downtown Dublin and very near my new school. I thought the street was lovely, with flower boxes blooming everywhere, but the kids in the neighborhood seemed to be ignoring me.

Jiyang and Melissa had lived beside each other for three years, but they had never become friends. Jiyang was shy and often tongue-tied, so Melissa thought he was stuck-up. Melissa, on the other hand, never seemed to go anywhere without her soccer ball, so Jiyang believed she care only for sports. Both Jiyang and Melissa were wrong in their judgements.

Example of a First Person POV Passage

It is funny that
trip has ended by being such a fast trip around the world.
find myself referred to now as one of the speediest travelers of all time. Speed was n’t at all what
had in mind when
started out. On the contrary, if all had gone the way
had hoped,
would still be happily floating around in
balloon, drifting anywhere the wind cared to carry
- East, West, North, or South.

First Person is always:
Talks About 3rd Person
Example of a Third Person Limited POV Passage

turned and started walking north on Hector, right down the middle of the street, right down the invisible chalk line that divided East End from West End. Cars beeped at
, drivers hollered, but
never flinched. The Cobras kept right along with
on their side of the street. So did a bunch of East Enders on their side. One of them was Mars Bar. Both sides were calling for
to come over.

Example of a Third Person Omniscient POV Passage

was furious. “The men who moved it last night hugged it when they moved it. There’s all kinds of hugging.”

refused to look at
again and instead stared at the statue. The sound of footsteps broke the silence and
concentration. Footsteps from the Italian Renaissance were descending upon
! The guard was coming down the steps. Oh, baloney! thought
. There was just too much time before the museum opened on Sundays.
should have been in hiding already. Here
were out in the open with a light on!

Clue Words: Third Person Omniscient
Watch for the use of the pronouns
"he/she", "him/her," "they," "them," "their,"
and the
characters' name
in this style of narration.

The keywords are the same as third person limited, so you have to be careful about knowing the difference between
3rd Person Limited
3rd Person Omniscient.
3rd person Limited
is only dealing with
main character while
3rd Person Omniscient
is dealing with
the main characters.
Clue Words: Third Person Limited
Watch for the use of third person pronouns
"he/she", "him/her," "they," "them,"
and the
name in this style of narration.
Answer: 1
Third Person Limited
Answer: 2
Answer: 3
First Person
Third Person Omniscient
That concludes our presentation, now
open your Starr Booklets
The End....
Video Example: First Person POV
Pause Clip
Video Example: Third-Person Omniscient
Video Example: Overall Third Person Perspective
So think......
1. Is the narrator in the story?
2. What pronouns are used?
3. Does the narrator know the thoughts and feelings of all the characters, one character, or none of the characters?

Two Characters
Two Perspectives
The Different Types of Point of Views
Stop Here
Full transcript