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ACA 2014 Code of Ethics: Values Counseling

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Tamiko Webb

on 31 March 2015

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Transcript of ACA 2014 Code of Ethics: Values Counseling

2014 ACA Code of Ethics
Value Statements
The American Counseling Association (ACA) represents new and expanded guidelines for preventing the imposition of counselor personal values on clients

Professional Challenge: Revisions
made by the ACA
Every teacher shall participate in the Continuing Professional Education (CPE) program of the Professional Regulation Commission, and shall pursue such other studies as will improve his efficiency, enhance the prestige of the profession, and strengthen his competence, virtues, and productivity in order to be nationally and internationally competitive.
Section 3.
Article V: The Teachers and The Teaching
Community
Teachers shall, at all times, be imbued with the spirit of professional loyalty, mutual confidence, and faith in one another, self-sacrifice for the common good, and full cooperation with colleagues. When the best interest of the learners, the school, or the profession is at stake in any controversy, teachers shall support one another.
Section 1.
A teacher is not entitled to claim credit or work not of his own, and shall give due credit for the work of others which he may use.
Section 2.
Before leaving his position, a teacher shall organize for whoever assumes the position such records and other data as are necessary to carry on the work.
Section 3.
A teacher shall hold inviolate all confidential information concerning associates and the school, and shall not divulge to anyone documents which has not been officially released, or remove records from files without permission.
Section 4.
It shall be the responsibility of every teacher to seek correctives for what may appear to be an unprofessional and unethical conduct of any associate. However, this may be done only if there is incontrovertible evidence for such conduct.
Section 5.
A teacher may submit to the proper authorities any justifiable criticism against an associate, preferably in writing, without violating the right of the individual concerned.
Section 6.
A teacher may apply for a vacant position for which he is qualified; provided that he respects the system of selection on the basis of merit and competence; provided, further, that all qualified candidates are given the opportunity to be considered.
Section 7.
Article VI: The Teacher and Higher Authorities in the Philippines
Every teacher shall make it his duty to make an honest effort to understand and support the legitimate policies of the school and the administration regardless of personal feeling or private opinion and shall faithfully carry them out.
Section 1.
A teacher shall not make any false accusations or charges against superiors, especially under anonymity. However, if there are valid charges, he should present such under oath to competent authority.
Section 2.
A teacher shall transact all official business through channels except when special conditions warrant a different procedure, such as when special conditions are advocated but are opposed by immediate superiors, in which case, the teacher shall appeal directly to the appropriate higher authority.
Section 3.
Every teacher, individually or as part of a group, has a right to seek redress against injustice to the administration and to extent possible, shall raise grievances within acceptable democratic possesses. In doing so, they shall avoid jeopardizing the interest and the welfare of learners whose right to learn must be respected.
Section 4.
Every teacher has a right to invoke the principle that appointments, promotions, and transfer of teachers are made only on the basis of merit and needed in the interest of the service.
Section 5.
A teacher who accepts a position assumes a contractual obligation to live up to his contract, assuming full knowledge of employment terms and conditions.
Section 6.
Article VII: School Officials, Teachers, and Other Personnel
All school officials shall at all times show professional courtesy, helpfulness and sympathy towards teachers and other personnel, such practices being standards of effective school supervision, dignified administration, responsible leadership and enlightened directions.
Sec. 1
School officials, teachers, and other school personnel shall consider it their cooperative responsibility to formulate policies or introduce important changes in the system at all levels.
Section 2.
School officials shall encourage and attend the professional growth of all teachers under them such as recommending them for promotion, giving them due recognition for meritorious performance, and allowing them to participate in conferences in training programs.
Section 3.
No school officials shall dismiss or recommend for dismissal a teacher or other subordinates except for cause.
Section 4.
School authorities concern shall ensure that public school teachers are employed in accordance with pertinent civil service rules, and private school teachers are issued contracts specifying the terms and conditions of their work; provided that they are given, if qualified, subsequent permanent tenure, in accordance with existing laws.
Section 5.
Article VIII: The Teachers and Learners
A teacher has a right and duty to determine the academic marks and the promotions of learners in the subject or grades he handles, provided that such determination shall be in accordance with generally accepted procedures of evaluation and measurement. In case of any complaint, teachers concerned shall immediately take appropriate actions, observing due process.
Section 1.
A teacher shall recognize that the interest and welfare of learners are of first and foremost concern, and shall deal justifiably and impartially with each of them.
Section 2.
Under no circumstance shall a teacher be prejudiced or discriminate against a learner.
Section 3.
A teacher shall not accept favors or gifts from learners, their parents or others in their behalf in exchange for requested concessions, especially if undeserved.
Section 4.
A teacher shall not accept, directly or indirectly, any remuneration from tutorials other what is authorized for such service.
Section 5.
A teacher shall base the evaluation of the learners work only in merit and quality of academic performance.
Section 6.
In a situation where mutual attraction and subsequent love develop between teacher and learner, the teacher shall exercise utmost professional discretion to avoid scandal, gossip and preferential treatment of the learner.
Section 7.
A teacher shall not inflict corporal punishment on offending learners nor make deductions from their scholastic ratings as a punishment for acts which are clearly not manifestation of poor scholarship.
Section 8.
A teacher shall ensure that conditions contribute to the maximum development of learners are adequate, and shall extend needed assistance in preventing or solving learners problems and difficulties.
Section 9.
Article IX: The Teachers and Parents
Every teacher shall establish and maintain cordial relations with parents, and shall conduct himself to merit their confidence and respect.
Section 1.
Every teacher shall inform parents, through proper authorities, of the progress and deficiencies of learner under him, exercising utmost candor and tact in pointing out the learner's deficiencies and in seeking parents cooperation for the proper guidance and improvement of the learners.
Section 2.
A teacher shall hear parent's complaints with sympathy and understanding, and shall discourage unfair criticism.
Section 3.
Article X: The Teacher and Business
A teacher has the right to engage, directly or indirectly, in legitimate income generation; provided that it does not relate to or adversely affect his work as a teacher.
Section 1.
A teacher shall maintain a good reputation with respect to the financial matters such as in the settlement of his debts and loans in arranging satisfactorily his private financial affairs.
Section 2.
No teacher shall act, directly or indirectly, as agent of, or be financially interested in, any commercial venture which furnish textbooks and other school commodities in the purchase and disposal of which he can exercise official influence, except only when his assignment is inherently, related to such purchase and disposal; provided they shall be in accordance with the existing regulations; provided, further, that members of duly recognized teachers cooperatives may participate in the distribution and sale of such commodities.
Section 3.
Article XI: The Teacher as a Person
A teacher is, above all, a human being endowed with life for which it is the highest obligation to live with dignity at all times whether in school, in the home, or elsewhere.
Section 1.
A teacher shall place premium upon self-discipline as the primary principle of personal behavior in all relationships with others and in all situations.
Section 2.
A teacher shall maintain at all times a dignified personality which could serve as a model worthy of emulation by learners, peers and all others.
Section 3.
A teacher shall always recognize the Almighty God as guide of his own destiny and of the destinies of men and nations.
Section 4.
Article XII: Disciplinary Actions
Any violation of any provision of this code shall be sufficient ground for the imposition against the erring teacher of the disciplinary action consisting of revocation of his Certification of Registration and License as a Professional Teacher, suspension from the practice of teaching profession, or reprimand or cancellation of his temporary/special permit under causes specified in Sec. 23, Article III or R.A. No. 7836, and under Rule 31, Article VIII, of the Rules and Regulations Implementing R.A. 7836.
Section 1.
Article XIII: Effectivity
This Code shall take effect upon approval by the Professional Regulation Commission and after sixty (60) days following its publication in the Official Gazette or any newspaper of general circulation, whichever is earlier.
Section 1.
Prepared by: Group 3
The 2014 American Counseling Association (ACA) represents new and expanded guidelines for preventing the imposition of counselor personal values on clients
Professional Challenge
The American Counseling Association (ACA) represents new and expanded guidelines for preventing the imposition of counselor personal values on clients


Ward v. Wilbanks is one of the most important legal cases to have an impact on the counseling profession in the past quarter century. The lawsuit, filed by the Alliance Defense Fund (ADF) (now called Alliance Defending Freedom) on behalf of former graduate student Julea Ward and against the counselor education program at Eastern Michigan University (EMU), has threatened to undermine the ability of the counseling
profession to promote nondiscrimination against clients based on sexual orientation.

Values Counseling: Legal Case
Does the Counselor's values matter?


Based on Biblical teachings, Ms. Ward believes that God
ordained sexual relationships between men and women, not between persons of the same sex. As such, Ms. Ward believes that homosexual conduct is immoral sexual behavior. Ms.Ward also believes, based on her sincere religious beliefs, that individuals are capable of refraining from engaging in homosexual conduct. (Ward v. Wilbanks, 2009, Compl. at 3-4)

The lawsuit was a direct threat to the nondiscrimination clause within the ACA Code of Ethics that specifically says that counselors may not discriminate against clients on the basis of age, culture, disability, ethnicity, race, religion/spirituality, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, marital status/partnership, language preference, socioeconomic status or any basis proscribed by law.”







Thoughts???
Reflect on scenario's
Is It permissible to deny counseling
services to a homosexual on the basis
of a counselor’s values?

The nondiscrimination section of the ACA Code of Ethics (ACA, 2014) C.5. states, “Counselors do not condone or engage in discrimination based on age, culture, disability, ethnicity, race, religion/spirituality, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, marital status/partnership, language preference, socioeconomic status, or any basis proscribed by law”.

ACA Code of Ethics
Professional values are an important way of living
out an ethical commitment. Values inform principles. Inherently held values that guide our behaviors or
exceed prescribed behaviors are deeply ingrained in
the counselor and developed out of personal
dedication, rather than the mandatory requirement
of an external organization. (p. 3)

How would you define this statement???
Values Activity!!!!!
Professional values as defined by ACA
The ensuing legal case allowed ACA to successfully present its official position on a number of important ethical issues:

Professional counselors may not deny counseling services to a homosexual person (or an individual belonging to any other protected class of clients) on the basis of the counselor’s values. (This is the BIG BANG)

Referrals are to be made on the basis of skill-based competency, not values.




A.4.b. Personal Values Counselors are aware of—and avoid imposing—their own values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. Counselors respect the diversity of clients, trainees, and research participants and seek training in areas in which they are at risk of imposing their values onto clients, especially when the counselor’s values are inconsistent with the client’s goals or are discriminatory in nature.
A.4. Avoiding Harm and
Imposing Values (ACA, 2014)
Counselors actively attempt to understand the diverse cultural backgrounds of the clients they serve. Counselors also explore their own cultural identities and how these affect their values and beliefs about the counseling process.
In addition, the ACA clearly states that when there are significant values differences, a counselor is NOT to make referral on the basis of values differences alone. Values clashes cannot be treated as lack of competency in a particular area of counseling.
Counselors refrain from referring prospective and current clients based solely on the counselor’s personally held values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. Counselors respect the diversity of clients and seek training in areas in which they are at risk of imposing their values onto clients, especially when the counselor’s values are inconsistent with the client’s goals or are discriminatory in nature.

The AACC code addresses the value systems of the counselor in these sections:
Affirming Human Worth and Dignity:

Christian counselors express appropriate care towards any client, service-inquiring person, or anyone encountered in the course of practice or ministry, without regard to race, ethnicity, gender, sexual behavior or orientation, socioeconomic status, age, disability, marital status, education, occupation, denomination, belief system, values, or political affiliation. God’s love is unconditional and, at this level of concern, so must that be of the Christian counselor.

Refusal to Participate in Harmful Actions of Clients:
The AACC code expressed an ethic to avoid supporting or condoning (while respecting and continuing to help) in the following areas: abortion-seeking, substance abuse, violence towards others, pre or extramarital sex, homosexual/bisexual or transgender behavior, and euthanasia. On this last issue, the ACA notes that the duty to breach confidentiality may be optional (thus indicating a values insertion since in all other cases we have a duty to breach confidentiality so as to warn others or protect the life of our client).

Cont:

Working with Persons of Different Faiths, Religions, and Values:
Counselors work to understand the client’s belief system, always maintain respect for the client and strive to understand when faith and values issues are important to the client and foster values-informed client decision-making in counseling. Counselors share their own faith orientation only as a function of legitimate self-disclosure and when appropriate to client need, always maintaining a posture of humility. Christian counselors do not withhold services to anyone of a different race, ethnic group, faith, religion, denomination, or value system.
Working with Persons of Different Faiths, Religions, and Values:
Counselors work to understand the client’s belief system, always maintain respect for the client and strive to understand when faith and values issues are important to the client and foster values-informed client decision-making in counseling.
Not Imposing Values:
While Christian counselors may expose clients and/or the community at large to their faith orientation, they do not impose their religious beliefs or practices on clients.


Cont:
Action if Value Differences Interfere with Counseling

Christian counselors work to resolve problems—always in the client’s best interest—when differences between counselor and client values become too great and adversely affect the counseling process. This may include: (1) discussion of the issue as a therapeutic matter; (2) renegotiation of the counseling agreement; (3) consultation with a supervisor or trusted colleague or; as a last resort (4) referral to another counselor if the differences cannot be reduced or bridged (and then only in compliance with applicable state and federal law and/or regulatory requirements).
Differences between codes?

There are many but let me identify two. Notice that
the most significant difference between the two is
on the basis of the AACC code biblical/christian
ethic regarding what is good and what is harmful behaviors. Both codes express the need to respect persons without regard to their beliefs, values, identities, and actions. The AACC code differentiates between imposing of values and exposing of values.



the only book that demonstrates how the Values Clarification approach can be used in the psychological helping professions.
incredibly practical, describing over 40 values clarification strategies with 1,000 or so examples of value-clarifying questions and activities that can be used to help clients work on specific issues.
substantial sections covering the history and development of values clarification, theoretical issues, research, multicultural issues, and comparisons between values clarification and other classic and contemporary counseling and therapy approaches
Suggested Solutions to Value Conflicts Cont:

Thus, in states similar to Alabama, counselors who are unwilling to follow the ACA Code of Ethics or the ethical codes of their respective licensure boards can forego licensure and membership in the respective state branches of the ACA. These counselors can choose to practice in nonprofit agencies or institutions whose values are consistent with the values of the counselors. It is reasonable to assume that while the foregoing resolutions to value conflicts are possible, for many counselors it is unlikely that either resolution is acceptable.

There remain counselors-in-training and practicing counselors who have personal values and beliefs in conflict with the ACA Code of Ethics yet who choose to complete their degrees in counseling and seek to be licensed and to hold membership in the ACA. These counselors need a perspective for the resolution of the conflict between their personal values and beliefs and ethical requirements. The following perspective is suggested as a means of meeting this need.

Results from the case:
Role of the Counselor

In response to the value conflicts experienced by counselors-in-training as well as practicing counselors, some in the field of counseling have suggested that counselors who are unwilling to follow the ethical guidelines should consider leaving the counseling profession or practice in a setting that does not require adherence to the ethical guidelines of licensure boards and professional counseling associations.

In states that require licensure only for counselors in private practice, an alternative solution exists to leaving the counseling profession as a means of resolving value conflicts. For example, in Alabama, counselors who work in nonprofit agencies and institutions are exempt from the licensure requirement.


Suggested Solutions to Value Conflicts
The only book that demonstrates how the Values Clarification approach can be used in the psychological helping professions.
Incredibly practical, describing over 40 values clarification strategies with 1,000 or so examples of value-clarifying questions and activities that can be used to help clients work on specific issues.
Substantial sections covering the history and development of values clarification, theoretical issues, research, multicultural issues.

This book offers support in Christian practices and treatment providing evidenced based therapy by integrating biblical teaching during treatment.
Solutions:
The Counselors’ Bill of Rights would offer such protections as allowing counselors to identify themselves as “Christian” when advertising
their services and to incorporate religious
principles in their counseling should the clients
desire it. Values-based referrals also protect
clients. Referrals may be necessary to protect
either the religious interests of the counselors
or the clients.
Final Thoughts???
Let's discuss....
Values Free Counseling:
Review Case Scenario!!!
Full transcript