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My Bondage and My Freedom

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Tichina Tam

on 6 March 2015

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Transcript of My Bondage and My Freedom

intro
In this excerpt of "My Bondage and My Freedom", Frederick Douglass recalls his experiences as a child in slavery. Douglass narrates how a once pleasant relationship with the woman of the house turns sour when it comes to deciding whether or not Douglass should continue learning to read and write. The mistress's husband convinces her that Douglass should not learn to read. From then on, Douglass did not give up his strife for knowledge; however, the mistress becomes cruel towards him. As Douglass accumulates knowledge and becomes literate, he is not effected how he thought he would be. He expected to feel content, but instead he becomes depressed with the reality of slavery. Douglass's thirst for knowledge will later aid him in assisting the abolitionist movement as an eloquent speaker.
Objectives
Lesson
Plan

Time Frame
Procedures
Assessment
Materials
Story To Author Connection
Story to Period Connection
Artifact 1
Artifact 2
Wrap Up
Quiz Questions
1.) As a young child, what kind of relationship does Frederick Douglass have with the mistress and her children? (Analysis)
2.) What aspect of Douglass’s life caused friction between the slave owner and the mistress? (Knowledge)
3.) What may be a possible motive behind the slave-owner’s strong opinion of the limitation on Douglass’s education? (Analysis)
4.) Douglass explains how the mistress has a change of heart and becomes angry in Douglass’s quest for knowledge in the following quote. “Mrs. Auld was an apt woman, and the advice of her husband, and her own experience, soon demonstrated, to her satisfaction that education and slavery are incompatible with each other.” What detail from the passage can be used to support Douglass’s statement that slavery and education cannot coincide peacefully? (Evaluation)
5.) Douglass is determined to learn to read and write. Who helps him to reach his goal? What does Douglass talk about with them which makes them uncomfortable? (Knowledge)
6.) When Douglass turns thirteen, he has the ability to read. As Douglass accumulated knowledge, was he effected in the way he expected? What example from the text can you use to support your answer? (Application)
7.) How is each character (Douglass, the mistress, the slave owner) affected by the institution of slavery? (Knowledge)
8.) Refer to the following quote, “We were both victims to the same over-shading evil—she, as mistress, I, as slave.” What evil is Douglass referring to in the quote? Use facts to support your opinion pertaining to if the the mistress a victim to this evil as well. (Application)
9.) What is Douglass’s purpose for writing this passage? What is the main idea about slavery that Douglass hopes to make in the passage? (Comprehension)
10.) How does the fact that this passage is an autobiography both maximize and minimize Douglass’s effectiveness in raising awareness about the evils of slavery? (Synthesis)
During the 1800s, the economy of the southern United States relied heavily on the export of cash crops, including cotton. Owners of large plantations used slave labor to cost effectively harvest and plant crops in order to produce a large profit. Douglass aided the northern abolition campaign by raising awareness of the horrible conditions of slavery by publishing personal stories including My Bondage and My Freedom in abolitionist newspapers. Conflicting feelings about slavery in the northern United States and the southern United States erupted into the American Civil War in 1861. The tipping point of the secession of the southern states, collectively known as the Confederacy, was the election of Republican president, Abraham Lincoln, who promised to work towards keeping slavery from spreading to newly acquired American territory. The Confederacy seceded on the account they felt their way of life was at risk. Leading abolitionists supported the Union cause during the Civil War, and they encouraged African Americans to offer their services as well. Frederick Douglass served as a reliable adviser to Lincoln throughout his presidency. Ultimately, the Confederacy’s belief in power at the state level, which limited the Confederate government’s power, and a lack of population and industry contributed to the Union’s victory in the Civil War. On December 18, 1865, the Thirteenth Amendment was adopted into the United States Constitution, which made the practice of slavery unconstitutional. Douglass gained an impressive amount of intellectual credibility to the African Americans’ cause in favor of civil rights and equality of ethnicities with his eloquence and speaking skills.
"My Bondage and My Freedom" is an autobiography by Frederick Douglass himself. Frederick Douglass was a slave, who while living with his family in Baltimore, was taught to read and write by his mistress. After escaping from slavery, he went to the North to make a living for himself, gaining major publicity for his great ability as a writer. He soon went back to his former owners' plantation and
Evaluation:
debate about an issue: Fredrick Douglas and Mrs. Auldy's relationship.

Should Fredrick Douglas still see Mrs. Auldy as the kind woman she was when she taught him how to read and write or should he see her as the woman who left him when he needed her most? Explain why and give examples.
My Bondage and My Freedom
Day 1 - 55 min
Day 1:
assign "My Bondage and My Freedom"
annotate the story
Day 2:
go over author connection
review the time period
talk about the story
Day 3:
class debate on Fredrick Douglas and Mrs. Auldy
Day 4:
overview of each character
write the effects of each character
Day 5:
take quiz over story, 20 minutes
Assign story for homework
Annotate for more comprehension
Day 2
Go over story in class and go over any questions. Review story and author connections for more comprehension.
A class set of American Literature textbooks
A class set of copies of directions for activity one
A class set of copies of directions for activity two
A piece of computer paper for each student
A class set of quiz printouts
Day 3
Classroom debate
Day 4
Activity two
Establish a firm understanding of the plot of "My Bondage and My Freedom" by Frederick Douglass
Discuss the historical and personal situation in which Frederick Douglass wrote "My Bondage and My Freedom"
Prepare for the quiz
used the money he had made for himself to officially purchase his freedom. "My Bondage and My Freedom" tells about his personal experiences living as a slave. From having a mistress who seemingly wanted him to be academically smart, he would soon figure out that since her husband did not support his learning, she would end up opposing it also. Due to Mrs. Auld refusing to teach him, Frederick would have to rely on only himself in order to further his literacy. I the end, we see that slavery would not only turn his Mistress bitter, but him also.
by: Frederick Douglass
This excerpt from Frederick Douglass's autobiography "My Bondage and My Freedom" narrates Douglass's childhood experiences as a slave. Douglass's situation limits his ability to be happy and to be educated. In class activities and discussion will help students to appreciate the personal situation and historical situation in which Doulgass writes his autobiography. During Douglass's lifetime, the economy of the southern United States relied heavily on the export of cash crops with the aid of slave labor to harvest plantations. Due to Douglass's skin color and time frame, he was seen as a person of lesser intelligence; however, he proved society wrong as a leader of the abolitionist movement. Douglass's speaking skills impressed the president and by doing so he helped to gain credibility towards the abolitionist movement. Douglass's message pertaining to the importance of equal opportunity and respect is valuable to today's youth as well, which supports the value of developing a deeper understanding of Frederick Douglass's "My Bondage and My Freedom".


Knowledge:
List the characters in the story.
Evaluate how each character influenced the other, as far as their decisions and the consequences that came with these decisions.
Day 5
Take quiz over story
Character overview
Frederick Douglass
seen positively:
She taught him how to read
She was his first love
She had to abide by her husband's rule
seen negatively:
She left him
He had to struggle to find ways to learn to read and write
She took her husband's side over his
was a slave to a family in Baltimore for 7 years
learned to read and write from his mistress, Mrs. Auld
loved Mrs. Auld due to her tender nature
started thinking education and slavery are incompatible after Mrs. Auld grew cold towards him
while on errands, he would pay young white children with bread to help him in spelling
learned to officially read by the age of 13
his love for Mrs. Auld disappeared because even though she fed him and clothed him, it did not compensate for his lost liberty.
Mrs. Auld
Douglass's Mistress who taught him how to read and write
suddenly stopped teaching him due to her husband's orders
saw Douglass as a human being, rather than just a slave
started opposing teaching Douglass how to read and write after her husband told her to do so
would get angry everytime she saw Douglass reading a book or writing
how she was once tender and compassionate, the evil that is slavery turned her into just like any other slave owner.
The nature of questions asked during class
During the time allotted for activities, walk around the classroom to check the progress of the students and their ability to complete the activities competently
Quiz scores will help determine if the students retained an adequate amount of information
Mr. Auld
was against Mrs. Auld teaching Douglass how to be literate
Full transcript