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A Mole of Gummy Bears

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by

Barbara Avalos

on 28 April 2015

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Transcript of A Mole of Gummy Bears

A Mole of Gummy Bears
Mass of a Gummy Bear
I found out the mass of 30 gummy bears from two different bags.
First, I measured 15 from one bag, and got the result of 40.1g, and then divided this number by 15, to get the mass of just one.
40.1g/ 15 = 2.67g
Water displacement
2 cm3 per Gummy Bear
How many moles of gummy bears are from San Francisco to New York?
We first multiply the length of a gummy bear by Avogadro's number.
2cm x = 1.204 x10^24 cm
Volume
The gummy bear was 2 cm tall, 1cm wide,
and 1cm deep.
Volume = h × w × l
= 2cm x 1cm x 1cm
= 2 cm^3 or 0.02 m^3

I also measured the volume of 10 gummy bears from each bag, with the water displacement method. The water went from 50ml to 70ml in both times.
70ml - 50ml = 20 ml
for 10 gummy bears
20ml / 10 = 2ml
This confirmed us that each gummy bear consisted about 2ml that is equal to 2 cubic centimeters.
The mass result for the second bag of gummy bears was 40.2g for 15 of them.
I then divided it by 15.
40.2g / 15 = 2.68g

To find the average of one gummy bear I added the two masses and divided it by two.
2.67g + 2.68g / 2 = 2.68 g
per gummy bear

I also found out that they were giving more grams of product per gummy bear.
39g / 15 = 2.6 g
2.68g > 2.6g
Bibliography
1."This Blog Powered by Gummy Bears." Disorderly Chickadee. N.p., 14 Mar. 2012. Web. 20 Apr. 2015.
2. "2.5 Year Old Girl Eating a Gummy Bear." Getty Images. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Apr. 2015.
3. "Gummy Bear - Gummy Bears! Picture." Gummy Bear - Gummy Bears! Picture. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Apr. 2015.
4."The Supreme Plate: February 2012." The Supreme Plate: February 2012. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Apr. 2015.
5."Giz Images." : Gummy Bear, Post 12. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Apr. 2015.
6. "Earth Fact Sheet." Earth Fact Sheet. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Apr. 2015.
7."Gummy Bear Love Wallpaper." Healthy Fast Food. N.p., 02 Oct. 2014. Web. 25 Apr. 2015.
8. "Distance between New York United States and San Francisco United States." Distance between New York United States and San Francisco United States. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Apr. 2015.

My representative particle is one gummy bear.
Moles
One mole of gummy bears =
gummy bears.
To get the volume of one mole of gummy bears, you have to multiply the volume of a gummy bear with Avogadro's number.
How many moles of Gummy bears would fit on our planet?
The volume of Earth is about
2cm^3 x = 1.204 x 10^24 cm^3
To know how many moles of gummy bears fit in the earth we need to divide the volume of one mole of gummy bear by the volume of the Earth.
Full transcript