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Same Grape Different Wine Tasting

University Club
by

Cory Hart

on 30 July 2013

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Transcript of Same Grape Different Wine Tasting

See
Swirl
Sniff
Sip
Savor
How to Taste:
Methods:

Méthode Champenoise
-second fermentation in bottle
-used in champagne, high quality

Charmat
-second fermentation in large tanks
-used for prosecco, good value

Gas Injection
-not so good
Originated in Burgundy, France

Among most widely grown varietals and in more regions than any other grape

Ease of cultivation and adaptation to different conditions
- takes on impression of
'terroir
' and winemaker
Terroir!
Sum of effects local environment had on production of the wine

Based of French AOC system
- land grapes grown in imparts unique quality
- unique origins and connection to Burgundy region
Benedictine and Cistercian monks
Barrels
Types of Oak:

French:
- more finesse, more delicate, soft tannins, more expensive

American:
- more intensely flavored, sweet and vanilla overtones

Hungarian & Slovenian:
- much more often use recently, more affortable and can have good quality
Rosé
First red wines produced were most likely more like rose than today's red wine

Style held favor around Europe for centuries

Late 20th century - got a bit of a bad reputation
-see: white zinfandel
Portugal
Probably the last major wine producing country to primarily use indigenous grapes

Still wines are making a big international presence recently
- vinho verde
- red blends

Reds from the Douro are generally big, bold wines from mountainous & terraced valley along river
- made with same blends of grapes as port

Thank You!
email:

cchart@pc.pitt.edu



presentations:

http://prezi.com/user/uclubcory/
Sparkling Wine
Chardonnay
History
- Monks
- Napoleon
Why so expensive?
Terroir
Quality Levels
Grapes
Burgundy
Chablis
Cote de Nuit
Cote de Beaune
Cote Chalonnaise
Maconnais
Beaujolais
Regions
Pinot Noir
Chardonnay
*Gamay (in Beaujolais)
Cote d'Or
Named after coastal city of Porto on the Douro

Fortified wine produced exclusively in the Douro Valley
oldest (1756) defined and protected wine region in the world
Chianti (1716) and Tokaj (1730) have older demarcation, but no regulation associated

Fortified with a neutral grain spirit, halts fermentation

Grapes: over a hundred varieties, although only 5 are widely used
Tinta Barroca, Tinta Cao, Tinta Roriz, Touriga Francesa, Touriga Nacional
Port
Methuen Treaty of 1703 (also known as 'The Port Wine Treaty')
became very popular in England when merchants were permitted to import at a low duty
long trip to England resulted in spoiled wine, fortification was used

The 1756 designation by Marques de Pombal guaranteed the quality of the product and regulated export

English war with France increased popularity

English influence on Port shippers:
Cockburn, Croft, Dow, Gould, Graham, Osborne, Offley, Sandeman, Taylor, Warre
History of Port
Tawny
aged in wooden barrels, exposed to oxidation & evaporation
no age labeled = at least 2 years in barrels
categories of 10, 20, 30 & 40 yrs indicate target age profile
blend of different years of oak aged wine

Colheita
tawny port from a single vintage
instead of age (10, 20...) actual vintage is mentioned

Garrafeira
oxidative maturation of years in wood (3-6yr), then further reductive maturation in large glass demijohns (8yr)
Styles
Styles
Ruby
cheapest and most extensively produced
after fermentation, stored in concrete/stainless - prevent oxidative aging

Reserve
premium ruby port, has "vintage character" (term now prohibited)

Rose
fermented similar manner to rose wine, limited exposure to skins

White
made from white grapes, variety of styles
Late Bottled Vintage (LBV)
originally destined for bottling as vintage port, lack of demand left in barrel for longer than planned
bottled between 4-6 years after vintage
either filtered or not
tend to be lighter bodied than vintage

Vintage
made entirely from grapes of a declared vintage year
decision to declare vintage is made by each individual port house (decision never taken lightly)
average of about 3x per decade
Styles

Syrah
The Pope
North vs South
Terroir
Rhone Valley
Reds
Syrah
Grenache
Mouvedre
Cinsault
Whites
Viognier
Roussanne
Marsanne
Varietals
Notable Appelations

Cote Rotie
Hermitage
Crozes Hermitage
Cornas

Chateauneuf du Pape
Cotes du Rhone
Gigondas
Vacqueyras
Tavel
Northern Rhone
Southern Rhone
Terraced Vineyards
of Cote Rotie
Stoned Vineyards of Chateauneuf du Pape
Clones
There are over 34 clonal varieties of Chardonnay
Same grape, Different wine
California
California
Makes up 90% of American wine production
1/3 larger than Australia production
On its own, CA would be 4th largest wine producer in world

Vitis Vinifera brought by Spanish in 18th c.
for religious sacraments for missions
'common black grape' from Mexico, later known as Mission grape

Gold Rush brought settlers and immigrants
brought viticultural knowledge and demand
Phylloxera and Prohibiton
Phylloxera struck in the late 1800s
destroyed vineyards, put many out of business
solution was known by then, so rebound was better than Europe

Over 800 wineries by turn of 20th century

18th Amendment enacted in 1919
put an end to all their fun
vineyards uprooted and cellars destroyed, many shut down
some able to survive by converting to grape juice and sacramental wine

By time of Repeal in 1933, only 140 wineries remained
Progression
Bulk, low quality wine until 60s-70s
entry of big producers like Mondavi, Heitz, David Bruce

New focus now placed on quality
UC Davis and Fresno State helpful with new initiatives in quality

Judgement of Paris - 1976
huge for California, gave it worldwide attention for quality wine
best of California blind tasted against best of France
panel made exclusively of French wine experts
California wines swept the red & white categories
Chateau Montelena Chardonnay
Stag's Leap Cabernet Sauvignon
This tasting opened up the doors for premium wine in the new world
Grapes!
Albariño, Alicante Bouschet, Alvarelhão, Barbera, Bastardo, Black Muscat, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Carignan, Charbono, Chardonnay, Chenin Blanc, Cinsaut, Colombard, Concord, Dolcetto, Dornfelder, Flora, Freisa, Gamay Beaujolais, Gamay Noir, Gewürztraminer, Grenache, Malbec, Malvasia, Marsanne, Merlot, Mourvèdre, Muscat Canelli, Muscat of Alexandria, Nebbiolo, Niagara, Orange Muscat, Palomino, Petit Verdot, Petite Sirah, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris, Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir, Primitivo, Riesling, Roussanne, Rubired, Ruby Cabernet, Sangiovese, Sauvignon Blanc, Sémillon, Souzão, Symphony, Syrah, Tempranillo, Teroldego, Tinta Amarela, Tinta Cao, Tinta Madeira, Touriga Nacional, Trebbiano, Trousseau gris, Valdiguié, Verdelho, Viognier, Zinfandel
"A Sense of Place..."
Production Methods
Skin Contact
-maceration
-vin gris

Saignee

Blending
Full transcript