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AP Language: Rhetorical Triangle

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Jonathan LeMaster

on 28 October 2013

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Transcript of AP Language: Rhetorical Triangle

Rhetorical Triangle
This presentation uses an adaptation of David Jolliffe's Rhetorical Triangle to teach elements of the rhetorical situation.
context
Time
Place
Situation
TPS
speaker/
writer
audience/
reader
subject/
topic
motivation
Context and experience
are linked to motivation.
Typically, speakers/writers
are motivated to write
about issues that relate
to them and the world
they come from.
purpose
Purpose is related to motivation. A speaker/writer's purpose is often driven by what is motivating him/her to write.
Rhetorical Triangle
Here are some sample questions:
Who is the speaker/writer?
What are his/her...
professional;
personal; and
academic experiences?
How is the speaker/writer related to the subject?
What is the speaker/writer responding to?
What's motivating him/her to write?
Where do we see the speaker/ writer in the text?
Is the speaker/writer credible?
Here are some sample questions:
How is the speaker/writer appealing to the intended audience?
Is he or she likable? In what ways?
Does the speaker/writer demonstrate an understanding of the needs, knowledge, values, and expectations of his/ her audience?
5 Canons
invention
arrangement
style
memory
delivery
We can use the rhetorical triangle as a mental framework to help analyze arguments.
Features
topic
focus
plan
proof
Features
order
structure
support
Features
diction
syntax
tone
devices
Features
connect to experience
speak to shared beliefs
make allusions
Features
genre
coherence
tone
effective voice
Everyday Use: Rhetoric at Work in Reading and Writing, Second Edition, 2009. Pg. 16.
Aristotelian Appeals
Ethos
Pathos
Logos
clear ideas
developed with
appropriate evidence
that the audience
would accept.
experience and knowledge
of the topic is valued;
the speaker/writer
is seen to have
the audiences' best
interest in mind.
audience is moved by
or interested in
what the speaker/writer
says and accepts
his/her central argument.
When analyzing a rhetorical situation, consider...
the context in which an argument is given (What is happening socially, politically, and economically?);
the relationship between the context and the speaker or writer's experiences; and
the audience for whom the argument is written.
The art of rhetoric (or argumentation) is divided into five categories called canons. Although these categories can be used to analyze and develop arguments, they are not the only way to study rhetoric.
Canon 1
Canon 2
Canon 3
Canon 4
Canon 5
Full transcript