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Pre Production

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by

William Cabral

on 30 April 2014

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Transcript of Pre Production

Pre Production
- is the process of preparing all the elements involved in a film, play, or other performance. There are three parts in a production: Pre-production, Production and Post-production. Pre-production ends when the planning ends and the content starts being produced.
Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4
The Process for the Rest of the Class
Notes
Absences During Pre Production Section
Midterm
Class Notes
Final Script
Questions
Assistant Director or AD
Script Breakdown
Color code
Cast
Stunts
Extra
Special Effects
Props
Vehicles/Animals
Sound Effects/Music
Wardrobe
Make-up/Hair
Special Equipment
Red
Orange
Yellow
or
Green
Blue
Purple
Pink
Brown
Circle
Asterisk
Box
Scene Count
Marking 1/8s
Scenechronize.com
Celtx
Stripbroad
Breakdown Sheet
Line Scenes
Scene Number
Scene Name
Page Count (8s of page)
Location Name and Number
Day or Night
INT. or EXT.
Characters Names and Numbers
Extras (How Many)
Other Notes: Animals, Music, Vehicles, Effects or Special equipment
Excel and Word
Color Code
Day EXT. -
Yellow
Night EXT. -
Green
Day INT. - White
Night INT. -
Blue
Demo
Assignments:
Create a Script Breakdown for your Script
Create a Breakdown Sheet
Director of Photography or DP
Producer
Read the Script
Script Breakdown
Exercise
Notes
Reminder of the Process
of the Rest of the class
Create a Script Breakdown for your Script
Create a Breakdown Sheets
Questions
Assignment Reminder


Lined Script



Shot List


Lined Script
Top Down Diagram
Location Scout
Storyboard
Shot List
Scenes are Numbers
Shots are Letters
Information Shot Lists Include
Scene #
Shot Letter
Location Name
Shot Description
Framing Choice
Camera Action
Dialog Number
Actors
Props
Notes
1
A
Classroom
Will stands in front of the class.
MID
Dolly In
1,2,6
Will
A Book
n/a
Example
Two Different Types
DP's Lined Script
Script Supervisor's Lined Script
The Differences:
The biggest difference is one is done in pre production and the other is done during shooting of the film. The Script Supervisor is responsible for keeping the most up to date record of what was shot and what each shot covers. That is why their lined script is slightly different.
Not ever shot needs to be storyboarded
Shots to Storyboard:
Sequences with action
Opening Scenes
Avoid dialog unless a specific set of shots are needed
Closing scenes
Any other scene you feel like needs to be visualized
Do your best with your drawings, they need to be detailed enough for someone coming into the project fresh could roughly frame up your shot on the day of shooting.
Things to take with you on a location scout:
Note pad
Pencil or Pen
Camera with wide angle lens
Compass or something to tell you the cardinal directions
What are Storyboards?
Things to look for when location scouting:
Does the room fit your scene?
Based on the room will you need to make compromises to your scene?
What in the room will you need to take note of for when you are shooting?
Where and how much power to do you have access to?
Where is the junction box?
Are their any restrictions to this location?
What direction does the room face?
Find out if something happens in or around the room at a certain time of day.
***There are plenty of apps to help with location scouting, they are not necessary but if you do it on a regular basis they might help.
What is a Top Down Diagram
Things that are included in a Top Down Diagram:
Light position
Camera setups
Actor blocking
Each diagram is based upon a single location
They can be broken up as need to avoid confusion
Example
***You could also take photos, framed how you would like them, to represent your shots.
Assignments:
Notes
Reminder of the Process
of the Rest of the class
Questions
Assignments
Create a Script Breakdown for your Script
Create a Breakdown Sheets
Lined Script

Location Scout Photos

Storyboard

Shot List

Top Down Diagrams
Producer:
Film producers prepare and then supervise the making of a film before presenting the product to a financing entity or a film distributor. They might be employed by a film studio or be independent, yet either way they helm the creative people as well as the accounting personnel.
Executive Producer:
An executive producer enables and backs up the making of a commercial entertainment product. He or she is concerned with management accounting and possibly with associated legal issues. An EP also contributes to the film's budget, and does not work on set.
Line Producer:
A line producer is a type of film producer who functions as the key manager during the daily operations of a feature film, television film or the episode of a TV program.
Co Producer:
Co-producers' responsibilities vary enormously depending on which type of Co-producer they are. However, they always have less responsibility than the Producer for the completion of the film.
Associate Producer:
Associate producer is probably the most nebulous title of them all. It could denote someone who makes a significant contribution to the production effort, or it could be the producer's nephew. It could be the person who brought the producer and the financier together or a producer's assistant who's recently been promoted.
Thor 2:
Riza Aziz
Leonardo DiCaprio
Martin Scorsese
Emma Tillinger Koskoff
Joey McFarland

The Wolf of Wall Street:
Gravity: Gabriela Rodriguez
John Ridley
Tessa Ross

12 Years a Slave:
Leifur B. Dagfinnsson
Man of Steel: Wesley Coller
Discussion
Budget
Locations
Casting
Pros
Daily Essentials
Problem Solving
Crowd Source Fund Raising
Personal Fund Raising
Your Movie
My Movie
Think Big Picture
Think Cost Effective
Think Compromises
Professional VS Non-Professional
Union VS Non-Union
We chose to be a union production
Production size determines pay
Hour requirements
The chose of our locations were contingent on other aspects of production
Personally Funded
Prop Master
Key Props
Rental Companies
Key Prop: The Car
Food
Transportation
Parking
Lodging
Just in Case Fund
Looked for restaurants and caterers
Had everyone drive their personal cars
During location scouting determined parking
The Police
Actor Issues
Car Breakdown
Location Issues
Be prepared as you can be
Dearing Group Example
The Scenario:
Budget $10,000
This is one spot out of Campaign of 4 spots
The look and feel has already been determined
How would I start?
Assignments:




Continue working on your other assignments
As you find out more about your production I would like you to start tabulating a rough budget.
sagaftra.org
Last Week of Pre Production
Call Sheets
Sides
Your Assignments
Create a Script Breakdown for your Script

Create a Breakdown Sheets

Lined Script

Mark 1/8s

Location Scout Photos

Storyboard

Shot List

Top Down Diagrams

Rough Budget
Turning it in

What to take away from the class
Interesting stuff
Evaluations
Thank you
3/8
2/8
1 4/8
Story Periodical Table
http://designthroughstorytelling.net/periodic/
Full transcript