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PBL 106 Presentation

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by

Farzana Begum

on 3 November 2014

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Transcript of PBL 106 Presentation

Natasha .Farzana .Farhana
Noorunisa . Amalina
Maslow's Need
Hierarchy
Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Theory
JOHN

VALUE X EXPECTANCY
=
MOTIVATION
John loses interest in his studies.
Sees no point in doing well.
Seldom have time for John
.
VALUE : THEN
Before parents divorce, John did well in school.
Parents pushed him in his studies.
Family was an important factor.
VALUE : NOW
EXPECTANCY
Non-participative during group discussions.
Lack confidence to voice out opinions.
Believes his answers will be wrong.
Lack of motivation within himself.
EXPECTANCY
John’s decreasing results.
Does not have any expectations to do well.
Absence of motivation.
VALUE X EXPECTANCY

=

MOTIVATION
_______
______________
X
FAMILY
Belongingness Need
The need to feel connected with others
Need to give and receive love
FRIENDS
Friends
Leave him out of activities
Tease about his family.
No proper friends
No reason to look forward to go to school.
Family
Uncaring family
Lapse in communication
No avenue for him to give and receive love
Microsystem
John ------------------- Parents
John ------------------- Teachers
John ------------------- Peers
Broken Links
Mesosystem
Family-------------- School
Family-------------- Friends
Friends ----------- Teachers
Lack of Interactions
SOLUTIONS
Parents
Parents &
Teachers
John
John's Morale Booster Plan
Counseling
Self-Empowerment Workshop
Mentor-Mentee Relationship
School Representation in Competitions
Part I : Communication
Parent-Teacher Partnership
Share complete information
Create an “open space” where differences can be explored and understood
Express commitment in word and deed
Establish regular communication
Evaluation and encouragement
Part II : Areas of Responsibilities - Teachers
Parent-Teacher Partnership
Encouragement
Commitment to Plan
Creation of a Conducive Environment
Assist in Education
Active Communication
Part II : Areas of Responsibilities - Parents
Parent-Teacher Partnership
Encouragement
Commitment to Plan
Communication & Collaboration among Parents
Quality time with John
Active Communication
“Cooperative learning environments focus on the interdependence among the classroom members rather than on competition between them. Typically, cooperative learning employs mixed-ability student groups who are given a set of instructional procedures that direct them to work collaboratively to master skills and increase achievement.”

- Johnson& Jognson, 1987; Slavein, 1990, 1995
Cooperative Learning;
High Achievements (Teachers)
Cooperative Learning;
High Achievements (Teachers)
Instructional Phase
Team Study
Quiz
Evaluation & Grading
TEAM SCORES !
John's Problems
Himself Studies
Not doing well in studies; grades are affected
Does not see the point in doing well
No aspirations & motivation
STUDIES HIMSELF
Feel depressed
Lack of self-belonging
See himself as a total failure
Seek comfort in gaming
Misses his happy family
Lack of
Support
Lack of
Teachers' Intervention
Broken
Families!
Broken Families
Authoritative Parents
Emotionally tortured
Absence of Support
Verbal abuse
Teacher's Intervention
Not making the effort to address the issue
Made assumptions of the situation
Refuse to step beyond their limits
Lack of Friends' Support
Ostracize him from the group
Always get bullied, received snide remarks
Child's Development
Fully functioning Systems
EXISTS
Conclusion
Family problems are DIFFICULT to conquer for TEACHERS.
We should never GIVE UP.
A teacher takes a HAND,
opens a MIND,
and touches a HEART
Thank You :)
Authoritarian & Neglectful Parenting Style
Together we CAN make a DIFFERENCE !
PARENTS
Stress conformity
Detached
Lack of verbal give and take
Withdrawn
Defiant
Lack social skills
JOHN
Together we CAN make a DIFFERENCE !!!
(Jeppson & Thomas, 1995; State of Connecticut Commission on Children)
(Strauss, J. (2002). Every voice counts: Holding a shared leadership event to make decisions together. Chicago, IL: Family Support America.)
Lower levels of psychological distress among both adult children and parents
Better self-esteem, happiness, and life satisfaction
Positive mental and physical health in adulthood
"Strong influence of the Parent-Child
relationship on child and adolescent
outcomes extends into adulthood."
LETS take a LOOK at some RESEARCH Studies !
(Umberson, D. (1992). Relationships between adult children and their parents: Psychological consequences for both generations. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 54, 664-674.)
Have good grades and less likely to have been suspended from school
Parental involvement and connection with older teens predicts higher grades and higher academic expectations.
"Children and teens who have positive
relationships with their parents tend to
have better academic outcomes"
(Herman, M. R., Dornbusch, S. M., Herron, M. C., & Herting, J. R. (1997).
The influence of family regulation, connection, and psychological autonomy
on six measures of adolescent functioning. Journal of Adolescent
Research, 12(1), 34-67.)
1. Hair, E. C., Moore, K. A., Garrett, S. B., Kinukawa, A., Lippman, L., & Michelson, E. (in press). The parent-adolescent relationship scale. In L. Lippman (Ed.), Conceptualizing and measuring indicators of positive development: What do children need to flourish? New York, NY: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Press

2. Herman, M. R., Dornbusch, S. M., Herron, M. C., & Herting, J. R. (1997). The influence of family regulation, connection, and psychological autonomy on six measures of adolescent functioning. Journal of Adolescent Research, 12(1), 34-67.

3.. Umberson, D. (1992). Relationships between adult children and their parents: Psychological consequences for both generations. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 54, 664-674.

4. Amato, P. (1994). Father-child relations, mother-child relations, and offspring psychological well-being in early adulthood. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 56, 1031-1042.

5. Shaw, B. A., Krause, N., Chatters, L. M., Connell, C. M., & Ingersoll-Dayton, B. (2004). Emotional support from parents early in life, aging and health. Psychology and Aging, 19(1), 4-12.

6. Dombro, A., O’Donnell, N., Galinsky, E., Melcher, S., & Farber, A. (1996). Community mobilization: Strategies to support young children and their families. New York, NY: Families and Work Institute.

7. Strauss, J. (2002). Every voice counts: Holding a shared leadership event to make decisions together. Chicago, IL: Family Support America.

8. Williams, A. (2002). Putting parent engagement into action: A practical guide. Chicago, IL: Family Support America.

9. Eggen, P., & Don, K. (2010). Educational psychology . (8th ed.). New Jersey: Pearson.

10. Tan, O. S., Parsons, R. D., Hinson, S. L., & Sardo-Brown, D. (2011). Educational psychology : A practioner-researcher approach . (2nd ed.). Singapore: Cengage Learning Asia Pte Ltd.
References
Eggen, P., & Don, K. (2010). Educational psychology . (8th ed.). New Jersey: Pearson.
Eggen, P., & Don, K. (2010). Educational psychology . (8th ed.). New Jersey: Pearson.
Eggen, P., & Don, K. (2010). Educational psychology . (8th ed.). New Jersey: Pearson.
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